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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good evening;

I'm new here, and my daughter and I have been shooting a lot of 3/8s clay recently, but I'm wondering if my accuracy problems are because I'm shooting the clay with standard bands (factory from simpleshot or Fowlers)?

Any thoughts for the newbie?

Thanks

D
 

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Matching bands to ammo will give the best velocity for a particular ammo but it shouldn't effect accuracy provided you are shooting within range. Concentrate on squaring the slingshot to the target and, most importantly, be aware of a smooth repeatable release of the pouch. You can take those two things with you no matter which slingshot you use.

winnie
 

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Well I would say it is yes and no. Can I assume you are shooting TTF because you'd probably be asking about how to avoid the soreness from hand-slaps otherwise?!

If you are shooting the standard SS black then it is certainly too much rubber for clayshot. Shooting light projectiles with overpowered rubber would also shorten band life. That's almost as bad as dry firing.

If you are asking purely about accuracy, it is a little more complex. For short distances and probably up to 10m, there is little difference because the projectile will fly pretty true. Within range is fine as Winnie says. You can shoot okay with clayshot at short distances. However, note that the trajectory of a light projectile will be different. So if you switch between steel and clay, don't be surprised to find your shots grouping very differently. For longer distances, clayshot has a tendency to veer unpredictably when shot with too much rubber and accuracy is definitely affected.

While you can shoot clayshot with too much rubber it is not recommended. You would get better results with matched bandsets for any given ammo. Having said that - ammo, bandset and slingshot can be quite dynamic. Plus you can tune the width of bands and customise the taper (if shooting flat bands). There are folk here with the patience to try different setups to find the one that works best for them for a given slingshot. Anyway messing around with rubber is part of the fun of this hobby.

For clayshot, I would use something light like 0.40 and certainly no more than a 0.45 rubber.

I find that with a light set-up, I can easily send clayshot 100ft with a predictable straight-drop arc trajectory. I shoot clay a lot and I use it for bugs and pesky monkeys tearing-up the trees in my garden. Clay just stings monkeys, does no real harm and is environmentally friendly.

Nothing wrong with clay. They can make great ammo and are relatively harmless. Just need to match the rubber.
 

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Dont worry much, it only took me 6 months to find my ideal setup with a particular latex ???? And I am serious.....
Listen to the advice offered and don't be afraid to experiment, that's the only way forward.
 

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Erm... yeah. Those clay balls are probably corkscrewing all over. As the guys say - you'll need to match the bands for the projectile's weight. Like Treefork says - I'd go at least 50% narrower.

Clay balls are cool though.
 

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Well I would say it is yes and no. Can I assume you are shooting TTF because you'd probably be asking about how to avoid the soreness from hand-slaps otherwise?!

If you are shooting the standard SS black then it is certainly too much rubber for clayshot. Shooting light projectiles with overpowered rubber would also shorten band life. That's almost as bad as dry firing.

If you are asking purely about accuracy, it is a little more complex. For short distances and probably up to 10m, there is little difference because the projectile will fly pretty true. Within range is fine as Winnie says. You can shoot okay with clayshot at short distances. However, note that the trajectory of a light projectile will be different. So if you switch between steel and clay, don't be surprised to find your shots grouping very differently. For longer distances, clayshot has a tendency to veer unpredictably when shot with too much rubber and accuracy is definitely affected.

While you can shoot clayshot with too much rubber it is not recommended. You would get better results with matched bandsets for any given ammo. Having said that - ammo, bandset and slingshot can be quite dynamic. Plus you can tune the width of bands and customise the taper (if shooting flat bands). There are folk here with the patience to try different setups to find the one that works best for them for a given slingshot. Anyway messing around with rubber is part of the fun of this hobby.

For clayshot, I would use something light like 0.40 and certainly no more than a 0.45 rubber.

I find that with a light set-up, I can easily send clayshot 100ft with a predictable straight-drop arc trajectory. I shoot clay a lot and I use it for bugs and pesky monkeys tearing-up the trees in my garden. Clay just stings monkeys, does no real harm and is environmentally friendly.

Nothing wrong with clay. They can make great ammo and are relatively harmless. Just need to match the rubber.
Great answer!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Good Morning;

Thanks for all the info! I realize I left some useful info out; allow me to correct that. We are both shooting OTT, and I laced my daughter's frame up with 5/8 straight green theraband and a kangaroo pouch from SimpleShot. I'm shooting the stock bands. The green bands work well for her 7yo size, and allow for good shooting mechanics.

Sounds like I need to either switch to steel for me, or change out the bands to something similar to hers.

Thanks again,

D
 
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