Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been shooting now for almost exactly one year. I doubt I've missed 10 days of practice during that time. I average about 100 shots a day. Those are conservative estimates.

I shoot TTF exclusively. White Daisy marble slingshot ammo - approximately .495 inches diameter. Flat 3/4 Simpleshot bands, no taper. Hold at corner of mouth.

My accuracy has steadily improved over that time, but I've reached a plateau. I mostly shoot at a 1 inch target from 10 meters. I'm hitting it about 30% of the time. Some days that approaches 50%, other days it's hard to buy a hit. 95% of my misses are within an inch.

I miss left more than right, probably 3 to 1. I miss low more than high, also probably around 3 to 1.

Just wondering - any of you who have been where I am and gotten better - how did you do it? Any tips for breaking through an accuracy ceiling?
 

·
Ray Rowden
Joined
·
2,651 Posts
Sounds like you're doing great!

Here are some things that seem to help me.

- Shoot some paper. Mix it in with your other targets. Paper provides a real clear picture of where your ammo is hitting.

- Change/experiment with your ammo grip. My idea is not instant improvement, but building up awareness of the grip and it's affect on accuracy.

- Mix in a variety of slingshot styles. An occasional departure from your accustomed hardware may prompt adjustments in grip and sighting. You can always return to your favorites.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,442 Posts
Pouch release determines accuracy. Make sure you have a good pouch release.

Try shooting at a dime sized target for a while or put a small mark in the center of your spinner. Really focus on aiming at the smaller target. Accuracy is all about being able to focus.

Have you tried shooting steel or lead ammo. I think marbles have a tendency to knuckle ball if the bands over power them. You don't mention what type of bands you are using or what your draw length is. It is important to match the bands to the ammo.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,345 Posts
I second Grandpa Grumpy Bill Hays told me to shoot in shooter time frames, which helped a bunch. I find if I start missing consistently I need to step away for awhile, like Bill said, because if don’t I start second guessing my shooting form. TreeFork. Says “just have fun”
 

·
Tex-shooter
Joined
·
4,493 Posts
OK do as I say, not as I do much anymore! Yes everyday practice is very important, whether you are a tournament shooter, hunter or just a plinker. Pay attention to the basics, like release, anchor point and such. It is important when you first start shooting you get a old time shooter to help you so that you don't form bad habits, as they are hard to break, once they are formed. I don't believe in worrying to much about what other shooters are doing, but concentrate on what you want to do do and most important have fun. It is nice to have a friend to get out and enjoy life with and even better if it is your wife or girl friend to share things in common! Just a old codgers prospective! Cheers, Tex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,511 Posts
I've been shooting now for almost exactly one year. I doubt I've missed 10 days of practice during that time. I average about 100 shots a day.
I mostly shoot at a 1 inch target from 10 meters.
And You still want to shoot with slingshot ?

I get bored too easily I guess :)

Try longer distance, smaller/bigger target.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,750 Posts
Loads of excellent advice from much more experienced shooters than myself, and I'm amazed you have so much patience. I'm another that can get bored easily but still enjoy shooting.

I mix it up as much as possible, different targets paper and 3d. Also at different ranges,sometimes I just chase a can around the woods and enjoy the scenery.

Definitely found it increases my accuracy when I get back to 10 meter target.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Loads of excellent advice from much more experienced shooters than myself, and I'm amazed you have so much patience. I'm another that can get bored easily but still enjoy shooting.

I mix it up as much as possible, different targets paper and 3d. Also at different ranges,sometimes I just chase a can around the woods and enjoy the scenery.

Definitely found it increases my accuracy when I get back to 10 meter target.
Yes, I appreciate all the great advice. Just what I was looking for.

We're all different. For me, what might seem boring to some is exactly what I love. I love the acquisition of skill. I used to play serious tennis. I gave it up a few years ago for a variety of reasons. What I loved more than competing - and I competed a great deal, with decent success - was the drills, the practice, the constant effort to improve.

Slingshot shooting has filled that void for me. I LOVE to work hard to find little improvements. That's how I escape. That's what I find fun. When improvement slows, so does my fun - a little bit.

Just the way I'm made.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,750 Posts
Not boring. I use to shoot target rifle at county level and was exactly the same, 6 days a week 100 rounds a day at the same paper targets. I can see where you're coming from.

I admire the dedication. Catapults do seem to side step most of the practices we are used to though. Which in many ways adds to their unique pleasure and frustrations.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
Lot´s of great advice here!

I also recommend using paper targets, to see exaclty where are you hitting, and make it easy to adjust your aiming point or anchor point.

Using smaller targets also help a lot, like Bill Hays says, aim small, miss small.

In the Slingshot World Cup, a lot of shooters where using 8 mm steel balls, with light bands. I started using .75 precise bands, 20 cm long, 1 cm straigth cut, and I´m getting better every day.

Also try changing your posture, sometimes little changes in your posture help a lot.

Is good to shoot 100 times a day, but is better to shoot 50 reviewing every detail, from your posture, bandsets, ammo, release, aiming, anchor point.

Hope it helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I've made some significant improvements since posting this. I haven't measured my improvements statistically yet, but I will. I know I'm close to twice as accurate as I was.

I made two major discoveries, but they're linked together.

The first was in band alignment. It wasn't that I was necessarily doing anything wrong, but I was missing left and right - mostly left. I didn't trust my band alignment because I'd be certain I'd lined up the same way and yet I'd miss. I paid particular attention to alignment and then tried to miss right more than left using the changed alignment. I was able to do that. Now I have more confidence that I'm lined up.

I still, however, would miss right and left and not know why. That was the most frustrating. I kept coming back to band alignment, but it wasn't helping anymore. Then I thought - look at your release again. A few months ago I had made a big leap by paying more attention to my release, so I thought I had it "fixed." I had come to think that whenever I missed big it must be my release. And that's true. What didn't occur to me - duh - is that my release could also cause me to miss small.

With that, I worked on trusting my visual alignment and then focusing on the "perfect" release. Bam! Just like that, another big jump in consistent accuracy. A big part in being accurate is knowing why you missed a particular shot. Now I think I do on everything but one type of miss.

Occasionally I'll miss big - more than an inch to inch and a half - high. I know it must be something with my release, but I can't figure out what would make it go high. I can see why the release could cause an unexpected low miss.

I shoot TTF, and I twist the pouch 90 degrees. That's why I can't see how my release could make it jump high. When you twist the pouch that way, the pouch leaves your fingers, twists back the 90 degrees, then goes forward until the ammo leaves the pouch. I can see how a bad release could mean a right/left miss, and even a low miss by slowing down the bands. What I can't figure out is why it would jump high.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top