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Hello all,

For the past year I havn't been shooting as much as I wanted to, so I've made it a point to get back into shooting. I always loved the instinctive shooting style, and I'll say I'm pretty a pretty decent shot with that.

I've never really been an aimer, because I use the 3/4 butterfly draw with a floating anchor point for power to use hunting.

I decided I wanted to start aiming. The first night shooting, I wasn't super horrible, but I still shot better instinctivly. I then watched a youtube video, and it spoke about using an anchor point, so I did that and immediately my accuracy improved. While I shot better with an anchor point, I decided I was still shooting better instinctively.

Again, I turned to a youtube, and watched a video by far north buscraft and survival (if that's not the name, it's pretty close). He said what improved his accuracy was that while he was aiming he also aligned the top and bottom band until they blended and became one.

I tried this technique while aiming. It did cause me to tweak the slingshot a hair, and I got the results I was looking for! Now I'm consistantly thwacking that small nickle sized target that I ordered from simpleshot just about every time I let her rip, using the top fork as an aimpoint (shooting gangsta).

I was happy shooting instinctive, now I'm happy to learn a new style. I've been at it for a few days now maybe some trick shots in the future ;)
 

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Shooting with an extended draw, doesn't mean you can't aim at the same time. The anchor may be floating, but that doesn't matter much. It does matter as far as consistency is concerned, but you can still aim.
I've discovered instinctive shooting recently, and what I understand about it, is that it is actually the same as aiming. The difference is what you choose to focus on, the target, your reference point, or, somewhat, both.
What will really bring a boost to your consistency is making sure your technique is good, it doesn't matter if you conciously aim, or if you aim intuitively, as I like to call instinctive shooting, as long as your technique is good, good will be the results.
It's a tough process, for me least, as the variables are just too many to learn at once, so you need to break it down to chunks.
Straight body, elbow position, pouch hold, release, head tilt, making sure you extend your elbow far enough to ensure you are at full draw, follow through, releasing just at right moment, which may mean you need to "float the pin" (thankfully my hand is very steady, I don't shake, but I suffer in every other respect, so...
As you see, aiming and not aiming is just one small issue among a myriad things that need to be taken into account.
As a matter of fact, even we, aimers, dont really aim, in the classical sense. I mean, we've shot so many shots, that we don't need to focus on the frame anymore, the brain just does it. That's assuming thousands upon thousands of shots of course!
So, what's really important is not hitting the target, as much, as making sure your technique improves over time, which means proper practice, and not necessarily much practice!
 

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Ive been down this road before, time to make a new video since its been rehashed a few times lately and Im all out of excuses with my internet back lol. Ill post it in here. :)

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Honestly I feel one of my biggest mistakes I make is concentrating on the target. If I’m shooting well (for me) my eyes stay focused watching the ammo pierce the paper target. I have days when I hang a can, and just let the ammo fly, not following through like I should.
 

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I previously used to shoot only semi-butterfly style for that extra bit of power, but accuracy and consistency was a significant problem; floating anchor points are difficult to master in my opinion. Some people have a natural talent for that sort of thing, I don't.

Having an archery background using recurve bows, I now shoot with a steady anchor point (rear jawbone), and achieve some very tight groups (4 cm) at 10 yards on my good days. I feel that the increase in accuracy certainly makes up for a slight loss in power, although the right band thickness and taper can help significantly.

That said, when I shoot larger ammo such as 16 and 20 mm with my homemade "magnum" slingshots, I of course revert to the semi-butterfly stance for maximum impact: this is when tin cans start looking scared :D ,

These days, I usually shoot at sections of corrugated cardboard with marked circles to see where I am hitting the target.
 

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Im still searching for a powerful set, ammo and style that works for me. Double bands have always given me trouble Idk if I just havent played with them enough. Single tapers are fast but still only kill rabbits outright ar medium distance in my experience. Looking to be able to body shot squirrels from 30-40 feet consistently and kill them on the spot or real close to it.

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Im still searching for a powerful set, ammo and style that works for me. Double bands have always given me trouble Idk if I just havent played with them enough. Single tapers are fast but still only kill rabbits outright ar medium distance in my experience. Looking to be able to body shot squirrels from 30-40 feet consistently and kill them on the spot or real close to it.

Sent using two thumbs and Tapatalk.
So... I tried hitting squirrels at 30' plus and it is still pretty difficult for me. Bears seem like a better target size. But, I worry they might get offended.
 
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