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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys. I have had a had time hitting my target with my Dankung. I am a sight shooter and hold the fork horizontally.
I was wondering what part of the ear of the slingshot you should use to aim to have accurate shooting. Thanks. JT
 

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I'm a hardcore dankung shooter so I shoot instinctively. I used to be like all you guys, aiming and not holding the forks at an angle. Then I learned how to shoot. I watched the dankung videos and noticed that they held and shot the dankung like Rufus Hussey shoots his sling. So I had to learn to shoot this way and it made all the difference in the world. I realized I had been wrong all those years. I also used to use wrist braces and shoot pistol grip slings as well (What was I thinking?). Luckily I saw the light.

Watch the video of the Chinese army guy and also watch the Rufus Hussey video. Instinctive shooting may not come easy but it's worth the effort.
 

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I don't use the ear of the slingshot at all to line up with the bulls-eye. I use the end of the rubber to aim with...the center of the turn going around the ear. However, instinct is a big part of the aiming process. Look through the slingshot and barely notice the end of the rubber as you focus all your attention on the target. After many shots you will have a gut feeling just like when you throw a baseball or a rock. The more you shoot, the more this "feeling" will become natural for you. Proper follow-through is very important to success. Hold your shooting position all the way through the shot until your ball hits the target. There is a feeling of "guiding" the ammo to the target with the hand holding the slingshot.
That's the best I can explain how to hit what you want to hit.
 

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I agree with truckee. instinctive shooting is not for everyone, but I believe it is a superior way to shoot a slinghsot. I mean why worry about sighting when you can just look at your target and hit it.
 

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I believe instinctive shooting is the result of a lot of practice. The beginner will always need a reference to be able to start hitting the target. As experience grows, so does the "gut feeling" or instinct to be able to easily hit a target?
 

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You guys are right practice is the key. How much more fun can practicing be? This is one of those things that are learned through a lot of repetition and hopefully after a while one day when you let yourself relax it happens.

Feel the target, be the target Grasshopper.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the tips guys. I used to shoot instinctively pretty well but then I switched to Bill Herriman's sight shooting style. Smitty are you suggesting that I hold the fork vertically? Thanks. JT
 

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No way! You should hold it the way that feels best for you! I hold mine "sideways" or horizontal and use the top fork as a reference when shooting.
 

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Thanks for the tips guys. I used to shoot instinctively pretty well but then I switched to Bill Herriman's sight shooting style. Smitty are you suggesting that I hold the fork vertically? Thanks. JT
My way whem aiming.
horizontal position
index finger of holding hand=height aim
tuber tubes=windage aim (taking care you only can see upper tubes becouse down tubes are behind them=you are holding the fork horizontal)
 

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I'm going to suggest that you hold the sling at an angle. There are many reasons but the main one is that holding the sling at a angle will give you a better visual reference as to where the projectile will fly. What I mean by this is that at an angle you can see through the forks (so you know that the ammo will hit somewhere near the center of those) and you can also see the angle of your bands (the angle of the bands to the sling and also the angle of the bands to the target) again giving you another visual reference. This will work for both traditional sighting and instinctive shooting as well. I also believe that this angle allows you to pull stronger bands by allowing your elbow to align better with you shoulder (watch Joerge pull those heavy bands and you can see how his arm is locked transferring the load to his shoulder). With the arm locked and the slight turn of the wrist you have the best of both worlds. Also the mechanics of a slingshot put an under spin on the projectile and the angle helps compensate for that again making it easier too hit the target (try shooting paintballs and you can really see the spin affect the fight). Since a dankung is designed to be shot flip style the angle also helps make this a more natural movement. I guess natural is the key word.

Good Luck
 

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All the above is very good advise
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the advice guys. I am shooting the bands it came with which are very short. Would using longer bands help improve accuracy? Thanks. JT
 

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Well JT that's kind of trick question. The length of the bands don't dictate weather or not the sling is accurate, that's up to you. Now if the bands are too short and you don't feel comfortable while shooting, that will have a huge effect on accuracy. Longer pull will give you better acceleration of the projectile and a flatter trajectory and might give you better accuracy.
 

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To add a little more,(I agree with Truckie), If you can pull your bands to your anchor point and your fork arm is held the same way each time without undue stress, which would cause you to shake, you are OK. I find my band length to be correct for me if it "bottoms out" or feels like it won't stretch anymore, about three inches past my anchor point.
So: too short you shake from holding band at anchor or can't pull to anchor.
too long and you can pull bands well past your anchor point.
Everything is relative to your opinion of what feels best to you. Stretch the bands too much over and over = high performance and quicker band failure. Stretch the bands too little = low performance and long band life. Somewhere in the middle is where I like to be because I target shoot 99.9% of the time.
If you hunt, you want maximum performance and you don't care about band life as long as they don't break during the hunt. I have hunting slingshots set up for high performance and target shooters that speed and stress is kept to a comfortable level, so I can enjoy a three hundred shot session and not ache later.
 

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I've been thinking about trying to help out by selling band sets. All I have right now is 17-45 tubing, which is a very good 4-strand target band. I have 20-40 tubing being shipped to me. It makes a very good hunting band with 8-strands. The 17-45 tube is too hard for me to pull as an 8-strand, so I don't use it that way. The 20-40 tube is smaller, so it is easier to pull. Just let me know what you want to try and maybe I can help you out. Only thing is I think I would need to charge $5.00 a set to do it, plus probably another $5.00 to ship it. Better to get several sets and ship in one box to lower cost of shipping? Input? Input?
 

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The best way to hit the target is to get a photo of your Mother in law and you will hit it every time, ha ha, but there has been a lot of good advice on this site, ive been shooting for a few years and still learning things of this site cheers jeff
 

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Good one Chief Shot In The Foot!
 
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