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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone so I have a question? I seen the post about what equipment to get for beginners but what about if you want to get a little bit more advanced on it? I’m seeing things about band saws, jig saws, scroll saws, drill presses belt sanders etc. my main thing is what should I get out of all this that will help me the most in working with a variety of materials from wood to metals like aluminum and what’s the difference between all this equipment on why people use one over the other? Thanks in advance you guys love the friendly advice here!
 

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My two most used power tools are a scroll saw and a spindle sander. Those two tools will allow you to get a really nice outline, and you can mostly use hand tools from there. A belt sander is really handy if you aren't starting with a flat board.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Aahh ok I’ve been going back to old forums trying to piece Everything together, what’s the spindle sander for exactly and the flat board? Is their a specific scroll saw I need like AMPs or size?
 

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The spindle sander let's you sand inside curves really nicely. What I mean by a flat board is the material you will be making your slingshot out of. You don't need anything special as far as scroll saws go. Any standard model would work fine. If you haven't made a slingshot before, I would recommend starting with hand tools and a tree fork.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The spindle sander let's you sand inside curves really nicely. What I mean by a flat board is the material you will be making your slingshot out of. You don't need anything special as far as scroll saws go. Any standard model would work fine. If you haven't made a slingshot before, I would recommend starting with hand tools and a tree fork.

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I'm getting the hand ones within a week to work on a some birch ply but I do know for a fact I'm wanting to work with other materials aluminum, g10, resins whatever else their is :) plus I have some aluminum cores I need to put band grooves in and scale up

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
IF.....you can swing it, I would suggest a 14" floor model Bandsaw, and a Spindle sander ( working towards getting both of these myself now, although
I do have an older, 14" 3 wheel tabletop bandsaw now that does okay, but not great )

Welcome to the forum and the ADDICTION, lol.
Well thank you it is very addicting haha, so a band saw? Why? I hear a lot of people say it's more expensive for blades and does pretty much everything a scroll saw does!?

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
A band saw is not good for tight turns. A scroll saw is much more nimble and able to make much more intricate cuts.
So In your opinion you'd rather have a scroll saw rather than a band saw? I seen scroll saws can cut out most material as long as you go slow and keep it waxed with like candle wax?!

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Welcome Yeayea13! :wave:

"I'm getting the hand ones within a week to work on a some birch ply but I do know for a fact I'm wanting to work with other materials aluminum, g10, resins whatever else their is :)"

I recommend not rushing it. Enjoy the hand tools for awhile. They're capable of extraordinary things. Guy named Fionda made this:

post-1975-0-16798500-1427587116_thumb.jp


Fionda said, "This is a fork made of yew (Taxus Baccata) I named Stratos , worked with chisels, blades and rasps; finished with sand-paper and some hands of camellia oil."

Beauty ain't it?

How about an introductory shop class while you get to know your rasp? There you'll gain at least rudimentary knowledge about the tools you've mentioned- and how to safely use them. Several of them are capable of transforming Yeayea to Yeeyee in the blink of an eye...

Savor your manual time. It will all be over with the purchase of your first Dremel tool.
 

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Mr. Mars
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Welcome Yeayea13! :wave:

"I'm getting the hand ones within a week to work on a some birch ply but I do know for a fact I'm wanting to work with other materials aluminum, g10, resins whatever else their is :)"

I recommend not rushing it. Enjoy the hand tools for awhile. They're capable of extraordinary things. Guy named Fionda made this:

post-1975-0-16798500-1427587116_thumb.jp


Fionda said, "This is a fork made of yew (Taxus Baccata) I named Stratos , worked with chisels, blades and rasps; finished with sand-paper and some hands of camellia oil."[/size]

Beauty ain't it?[/size]

How about an introductory shop class while you get to know your rasp? There you'll gain at least rudimentary knowledge about the tools you've mentioned- and how to safely use them. Several of them are capable of transforming Yeayea to Yeeyee in the blink of an eye...[/size]

Savor your manual time. It will all be over with the purchase of your first Dremel tool.[/size]
That is a fine specimen indeed. Nothing wrong with hand tools. It was done that way thousands of years before DeWalt ever came around and it will be done that way again some day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Welcome Yeayea13! :wave:

"I'm getting the hand ones within a week to work on a some birch ply but I do know for a fact I'm wanting to work with other materials aluminum, g10, resins whatever else their is :)"

I recommend not rushing it. Enjoy the hand tools for awhile. They're capable of extraordinary things. Guy named Fionda made this:

post-1975-0-16798500-1427587116_thumb.jp


Fionda said, "This is a fork made of yew (Taxus Baccata) I named Stratos , worked with chisels, blades and rasps; finished with sand-paper and some hands of camellia oil."

Beauty ain't it?

How about an introductory shop class while you get to know your rasp? There you'll gain at least rudimentary knowledge about the tools you've mentioned- and how to safely use them. Several of them are capable of transforming Yeayea to Yeeyee in the blink of an eye...

Savor your manual time. It will all be over with the purchase of your first Dremel tool.
Hey your are completely right about nothing compares to a job done purely by the hands and brain theirs only 3 things wrong though 1st I have some slingshots made with g10 and carbon fiber and honestly want to learn to venture into that beautiful section of slingshot making mainly because ince I get it down good it'll be cheaper to make my own 2nd I had actually just bought myself a dremel not to long ago and 3rd well OCD kinda wants fine work like this to be pretty spot on

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Welcome Yeayea13! :wave:

"I'm getting the hand ones within a week to work on a some birch ply but I do know for a fact I'm wanting to work with other materials aluminum, g10, resins whatever else their is :)"

I recommend not rushing it. Enjoy the hand tools for awhile. They're capable of extraordinary things. Guy named Fionda made this:

post-1975-0-16798500-1427587116_thumb.jp


Fionda said, "This is a fork made of yew (Taxus Baccata) I named Stratos , worked with chisels, blades and rasps; finished with sand-paper and some hands of camellia oil."

Beauty ain't it?

How about an introductory shop class while you get to know your rasp? There you'll gain at least rudimentary knowledge about the tools you've mentioned- and how to safely use them. Several of them are capable of transforming Yeayea to Yeeyee in the blink of an eye...

Savor your manual time. It will all be over with the purchase of your first Dremel tool.
Hey your are completely right about nothing compares to a job done purely by the hands and brain theirs only 3 things wrong though 1st I have some slingshots made with g10 and carbon fiber and honestly want to learn to venture into that beautiful section of slingshot making mainly because ince I get it down good it'll be cheaper to make my own 2nd I had actually just bought myself a dremel not to long ago and 3rd well OCD kinda wants fine work like this to be pretty spot on

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Welcome Yeayea13! :wave:

"I'm getting the hand ones within a week to work on a some birch ply but I do know for a fact I'm wanting to work with other materials aluminum, g10, resins whatever else their is :)"

I recommend not rushing it. Enjoy the hand tools for awhile. They're capable of extraordinary things. Guy named Fionda made this:

post-1975-0-16798500-1427587116_thumb.jp


Fionda said, "This is a fork made of yew (Taxus Baccata) I named Stratos , worked with chisels, blades and rasps; finished with sand-paper and some hands of camellia oil."[/size]

Beauty ain't it?[/size]

How about an introductory shop class while you get to know your rasp? There you'll gain at least rudimentary knowledge about the tools you've mentioned- and how to safely use them. Several of them are capable of transforming Yeayea to Yeeyee in the blink of an eye...[/size]

Savor your manual time. It will all be over with the purchase of your first Dremel tool.[/size]
That is a fine specimen indeed. Nothing wrong with hand tools. It was done that way thousands of years before DeWalt ever came around and it will be done that way again some day.
You are exactly right

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As far as I can say
..my most used power tools are a tabletop drill press (aslo my spindle sander as I use druma that plug right into the chuck) and a scroll saw.

I prefer scroll saws over bands saws for easy of tight cuts. quieter, and blade changes (and cost of blades) are fast and easy.

The rest of my tools are hand powered and very tedious...just the way I like it.

Apologies- my memory is not holding all the questions I want to answer.

A bandsaw is good for (with a good jig or guide) making a relatively straight resaw...that is were you cut a board into thinner boards with the same width. Hard to explain easy to see

A bandsaw is on my wish list. If you get set up in a year or so you can pretty much make any frame to fit any hand...and there will never ever be a wasted piece of scrap wood again.

One thing I wish I had been told when starting out (2 things now) Get a good set of small files (and a wire brush to clean them) and the sand paper with a tacky strong backing.

Also aluminum is fun to work, but NEVER use the abrasives that you use on aluminum on anything else.

1st a grinding wheel will explode sometimes...2nd- that aluminum dust will get in the wood grain. Argh! It is nasty stuff...wash all cores with rubbing alcohol and hands before you even pick up a bit of wood or tools.

Alao slow cure epoxies are a wonder for anyone, but just starting out...you will need the time to put it all together.

I use T-88 epoxy...a word to Google when you're ready... becauae "slow cure epoxy" may not turn up a result or it will bring you to very expensive epoxies.
 
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