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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've always anchored at the ear, probably not for any good reason other than the thumb in the hollow under the ear seemed repeatable.

I do recall some discussion about whether you should keep a consistent anchor or change it for different distances, or maybe different band strengths.

With the very light bands I'm using the trajectory is pretty curved. But also I shoot sideways and aim off the top fork. Indoors my fork is below the can i'm trying to hit.

Years ago I did an interlibrary loan request and eventually got a copy of Richard Middleton's "Man Powered Bullets."

https://www.amazon.com/Practical-Man-Powered-Bullets-Richard-Middleton/dp/0811701565

This week i spotted it on hoopla and I'm reading it again on my kindle. There's a long section on "catapults." The point I found interesting is he talked a little bit about an optimum distance for the height of sight line above start of the trajectory, such that aim changes would be minimized. I think it was in reference to archery and a shoulder anchor, I'll have to go back and look.

It made me wonder if there's a better anchor point for me, and if that would change if/when I get to stronger bands.
 

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This looks like a super interesting book! I will have to check it out.

For anchor points, I have noticed that the point of impact of the ball changes depending on the width of the fork. And as luck would have it, my two favorite frames have very different fork widths. So I ended up learning two different anchor points. For the wide fork I anchor at the bottom of my ear lobe. For the narrow forked frame I anchor high on my cheek. From these anchors, they point of impact is just barely over the fork tip. These two anchors allow me to shoot both frames with the same aiming point.

I suppose life would get even more complicated if I picked up a few more favorites with different fork widths yet, for now I think I'll stick with these two and try to get more proficient with both. I will also note the entertainment / frustration when my mind goes absent and I use the low anchor with the narrow forks and send the ball a couple inches over my catch box!

If I ever get really good perhaps I'll reach a point where I can creep the anchor points up or down by little bits to adjust for range variations like archers who string creep do. Really neat to watch really accomplished archers who actually count the serving threads around the knocking point to adjust the string hold point up or down to adjust for distance variations. For now I'm still trying to get proficient with the fixed anchors and holding a bit over or under to adjust for distance to target.

Looking forward to checking the book out, and thank you very much for sharing the link to it, as well as starting a very interesting topic thread!
 

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I went for Simple if not the boring way. I found my Anchor Point of 98 mm and now all my slingshots I shoot have the same fork width. Not as fun as trying out all the new slingshots but I can keep my Achor the same and I know no matter what slingshot should I pick up it is going have the same anchor and trajectory. Just a little food for thought

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I reread that section just now.

And yes I found the book fascinating and he's a really engaging writer.

Anyway he says target archers anchor under the chin, resulting in a line of sight of5 inches above and tangent to the curved flight of an arrow. At 170 fps that can be dead on at 5and15 yards.
 

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I tried adjusting my anchor to the different fork widths, but I went back to anchoring to my earlobe, when not shooting butterfly.
4.125" fork width is dead on for me at 10 mtrs. The narrower the forks, the farther the distance to hit a bullseye. I shot instinctive before and went back to instinctive because trying to change my anchor point took away to much of my consistency. I did try it and it worked... but I'd rather pick up a slingshot and feel the shot
 

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I tried adjusting my anchor to the different fork widths, but I went back to anchoring to my earlobe, when not shooting butterfly.
4.125" fork width is dead on for me at 10 mtrs. The narrower the forks, the farther the distance to hit a bullseye. I shot instinctive before and went back to instinctive because trying to change my anchor point took away to much of my consistency. I did try it and it worked... but I'd rather pick up a slingshot and feel the shot
I have been sticking with just the two anchors and it has gotten to where they are both quasi-instinctive. I still have the fork in my vision but don't really aim with it so much. And usually I don't even think about it and automatically anchor high with the narrow frame and low with the wide. This also helps up the surprise factor I give myself when I mix the wrong anchor with the wrong frame. Sometimes takes me a second to figure out why the shot went that far high or low!
 

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I reread that section just now.

And yes I found the book fascinating and he's a really engaging writer.

Anyway he says target archers anchor under the chin, resulting in a line of sight of5 inches above and tangent to the curved flight of an arrow. At 170 fps that can be dead on at 5and15 yards.
It is too much for me so I don't do it, but here is a link to the string walking in archery. By pulling the string from different places you can raise or lower the trajectory of the arrow and thus hit the same target with the same anchor and aiming point (pin or tip of the arrow or point on the riser)- the trajectory adjustment is all made by having the nock of the arrow higher or lower when you release. For those who are really into it there are even tabs with rulers on them so you can be really precise about how much you move your hand up or down the string when drawing.

Like I said- way too much for me to worry about but sort of cool to see how creative and dedicated people are to figuring out how to compensate for trajectory.

For slingshots I don't think this would work. I think the analogous system would be putting the ball in the pouch asymmetrically to get more or less pull from the top or bottom of the band. And this seems like it would alter trajectory, and lead to increased fork hits as much as compensating for drop of the ball when it reaches the target. While I love to fiddle with different things I don't see trying this one.

https://trojanarchery.com/2019/09/28/introduction-to-stringwalking/
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I don't think this is supposed to be adjustable for distance.

Like sighting in a firearm, you choose a range that minimizes holdover or under for what you shoot.

Choosing an anchor point determines how far below your line of sight your launch line is. Given our slow velocity and looping trajectory, how far below is optimal?

I use my ear lobe because that's how I've always done it but maybe there's a better way. Butterfly shooters anchor farther below sight line.
 

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I don't think this is supposed to be adjustable for distance.

Like sighting in a firearm, you choose a range that minimizes holdover or under for what you shoot.

Choosing an anchor point determines how far below your line of sight your launch line is. Given our slow velocity and looping trajectory, how far below is optimal?

I use my ear lobe because that's how I've always done it but maybe there's a better way. Butterfly shooters anchor farther below sight line.
I agree, the description in the book isn't supposed to be adjustable for distance- more a best compromise to be good over a variety of useful distance. The string crawling I mentioned is an attempt to add distance compensation to that fixed anchor.

For me shooting a bow, the chin anchor is too low. When I do corner of the mouth the over / under compensation I need to do "instinctually" is within reason for any range I am likely to try and hit something at, usually 30 yds or less. For slingshots, I pick an anchor that puts the top fork on the point of impact at 10-15 yards and go from there.
 
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