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Brotherhood Of The Slingshot Nutz
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here is a real target shooting slingshot I just got finished with tonight. I made it with a three and a half inch span from the center of each ring across the fork. It is quarter inch steel, wrapped with rubber and a safety lanyard just in case of a slip. I feel kinda funny showing my ugly slingshots after seeing all the beautiful wooden works of art nominated for the slingshot of the month. But, it takes all kinds to make a world, so I guess I'll just have to be content with function and very little beauty for now. However, I am thinking of getting some metal polishing equipment that just might help the looks.
The quarter inch size rod is great for long target shooting sessions as the weight is quite a bit less than 5/16" rod. I made sure also to build it with a low fork height to ease tendon stress at the heel of the wrist. This is where I have been getting sore lately after shooting.
 

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Member, Brotherhood of Slingshot Nutz
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Hey Smitty,

That's not ugly to me. Looks like a fine blend of form and function. One question, though. When you say "a real target shooting slingshot," what separates a target-shooting s.s. from a hunter? I mean, equipped with the right rubber and ammo, that looks like it could kill a bunny rabbit as well as, say, a Fish Hunter to me.

You can tell I am a newbe.
 

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Super work, smitty!
Love the wrap and lanyard!

(...And it ain't ugly!!!)

"I was such an ugly kid. When I played in the sandbox, the cat kept covering me up." ~ Rodney Dangerfield

(Now that's ugly!)
 

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Good lookin "Pretzel" Smitt man! I think it will be a wonderful shooter for you! Flatband
 

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Brotherhood Of The Slingshot Nutz
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To answer Dayhikers' question about what is the difference between a target and a hunting slingshot I will give it my best. A target slingshot I rig with lighter bands so I can shoot hundreds of rounds without getting too tired and with most people bands of moderate pull are easier to be accurate with. Secondly, a target slingshot has to be comfortable and designed to fit the hand better than a hunting slingshot. The slingshot frame can be large and lighter in weight with wide forks to help prevent fork hits and improve accuracy. The pouch should also be a smaller and lighter in size because of the lighter bands and usually 3/8" ammo.
A hunting slingshot will only be shot a few times per outing at game, they are usually small frames with very powerful bands, strong construction and easily fit in a pocket. There is no problem with the shooter getting tired from the heavy pull bands. Larger heavy lead ammo also requires a larger pouch to control the shot. It makes sense to have as much energy behind a large lead ball from powerful bands that the shooter can control for a good quick knock-down kill.
So why wear yourself out shooting a couple of hundred rounds using hard to pull bands on a hunting slingshot, when you can lighten things up and shoot much more comfortably and with better accuracy using a slingshot designed for targets?
Yes, we have to practice with our hunting slingshots to be able to take game like we want to, but if only target shooting is the goal,we don't need all that extra strain on our bodies shooting a slingshot designed for hunting.
The bands I have on this slingshot are kind-of a middle range pull weight and shoot with a pretty flat trajectory that is just about perfect for me.
I'm sure some would say they are too light and others would say they are too heavy. Each shooter decides for himself what constitutes a target or a hunting slingshot.
 

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By Grab- THAT'S A DANDY SHOOTER FELLA- you did good, I like it
 

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Brotherhood Of The Slingshot Nutz
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With a jig and heat it only takes about 15 minutes to bend it. Then you have to cut the extra metal off the ears with a cutting wheel...very, very carefully, then reheat the ear and tap it down flat. I use an anvil to tap it here and there to get it straight and flat. Then you smooth out the end of the rod with emery cloth where you cut it with the cutting wheel so it won't cut the rubber when you slide it under the rod end and inside the ring. Once the rod ends are smooth as a babys' butt you slowly squeeze the rings almost closed with wood or plastic covering the jaws of your vise. Then you spend more time polishing, (especially the rings) the rest of the slingshot. Then you have to emory out all the hammer dents you made by hitting too hard and leaving a dent. That's why I said "tap" and not knock, hit or pound. If everything goes by the plan it'll take a couple of hours to have a cool new shooter. If it doesn't go right you just toss it in the trash and smile as you start over with a new rod and more knowledge to help on the next one.

Biggest thing I learned is to start at the bottom of the handle with the rod and add bending posts as you go past the bending spots. That is how you keep it flat. You assemble the jig as you bend the slingshot. You finish at the ears.

Finally, start with an extra foot of rod. Mark the middle of the rod and that mark goes to the bottom of the handle, with one end inside the first bend post to give leverage to bend around the handle and up to the first ear on the other side
. Clamp the rod down flat with heat proof clamp also before you start bending and you will know when you can take the clamp off to finish the other side. The extra rod length gives you enough metal to have leverage enough to finish around the ears, or rings.

Here is a picture from Dankung on how they use their jig:
 

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Brotherhood Of The Slingshot Nutz
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well thank you so much...all of you for making me feel better about my new slingshot, it really does shoot totally sweet! The frame allows very good vision of the target when shooting. I'm trying real hard to learn this tricky craft of making slingshots out of steel rod. I have done a fair amount of maintenance welding with a mig and have used a torch for welding thin steel and brazing stuff. Still it requires an educated touch to keep from ruining the project, especially when cutting the ring ends after everything is bent up. One slip when cutting the ring ends and you will likely just have to toss it in the trash.
Thanks for the encouragement guys!
 

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Member, Brotherhood of Slingshot Nutz
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Smitty, thanks for taking the time to answer my question so thoroughly.
 

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Brotherhood Of The Slingshot Nutz
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You are very welcome!
 
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