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SLING-N-SHOT
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5,197 Posts
For me, it started out being my Mora blade, but I got tired of having the edge dulled by bark / dirt in the bark, and always having to
sharpen it as I also mainly use it for my carving.

Now, I have switched to an Irwin carpet blade / hawk bill knife for stripping bark.

It has a chisel ground, single beveled edge, and works fantastically on even the toughest of bark......I can really get up in the crotch or V of the forks with the tip of it, and mostly use very controlled pull cuts towards myself, with the forks pressed tightly into my pile of shavings in the trash can I keep around......and if it slips, the hook of the tip catches safely in the V of the forks.

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Super Moderator
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2,259 Posts
I always start with a 10" draw knife because of the amount of control that I have with it. It's an old draw knife that was used to build our house over 100 years ago now and I've been using it and others all of my life. I also have some spoke shaves, but for debarking and initial smoothing, the draw knife makes it quick and easy.
 

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SLING-N-SHOT
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5,197 Posts
My Mora Eldris has a 90° spine. The spine works really well removing bark (wild cherry).
I've flattened the spine on my Mora's and rolled a burr like a cabinet scraper has, and use it to scrape my naturals after I've debarked them and carved them to the shape I want....prior to any sanding.

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