Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone.

I am a new slingshot shooter. Not quite a week into it and probably shot around 500 shots so far.

Today, I was shooting at paper targets from 33 ft away. I was getting some center hits, but the target mostly looks like it was hit with a shotgun (holes all over the place).

BUT, later today, I went outside and shot at some cans from 80 ft. After the first couple of misses, I started hitting them pretty consistently, roughly 70% hit rate. I was even hitting the cans when they were on their side with the base or top pointed towards me.

My question is, why is it so hard to get good groupings on paper, but much easier to hit a smaller target even further away?

I guess the answer might by "aim small miss small" but it is kind of perplexing.

I am using 10 meter air pistol targets, so the bullseye isn't all that large at 33 ft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,733 Posts
Some people get a little goosey with targets. Try a big old piece of paper with a vertical and horizontal + on it shoot for the center. don't go look until you have shot 5-10 shots. I bet the group is much better.
 

·
Trying to find my way.
Joined
·
399 Posts
I know that I shoot better when it's not just paper. That sensory feedback really helps, as does the satisfaction from smashing something up. Sort of book vs hands on larnin'. The hands on larnin' is more fun, more practical, and you can see how it applies to the real world.
 

·
Ray Rowden
Joined
·
2,462 Posts
My good man, if you are hitting a can from 80 feet even half the time, you are rocking!

Replace your paper targets with a small spinner. Let your muscle memory develop on hitting that reactive target.

THEN break out the paper every once in a while. Let the paper confirm where the misses are going. That's what it is really good for.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,185 Posts
LOL - I think there is something more fun about shooting cans - so the concentration is less and we tend to actually shoot a little better as a result.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,263 Posts
Hitting a tin can, or for that matter anything that either dents or breaks after the impact of ammo (whether from a gun or slingshot) is way more satisfying :headbang: than a few holes on a paper target - no question about it. Yes, paper targets can become rather boring :boring:.

That said, shooting at paper or cardboard, and seeing how your shots group after a string of 5 shots or so will give you a clear indication of your progress in terms of correct techniques. Initially, the best approach is to draw a large cross with a marker pen on a piece of corrugated cardboard, and to aim and shoot consistently at the center of that cross at 8 to 10 yards. Regular practice is essential too, particularly in the early stages, as that will speed up the learning curve and essential muscle memory. Standing sideways like in archery, and using a fixed anchor point on the cheekbone, etc. significantly helps too in my opinion. Floating anchor points should be left until one has mastered fixed anchor point shooting techniques (to each their own, of course).

These days, I shoot mostly at small 1-inch diameter circles drawn on sheets of corrugated cardboard placed against an old bath towel slung over trestles at 10 yards. I have improved my aiming stability by strengthening essential muscles in the left arm (slingshot holding hand) with the daily exercise of two 3 kg weights held with the arms extended (up and down motion with intervals): a steady anchor point is great, but it is ultimately how steady your slingshot holding hand is that will determine consistent accuracy - not to mention the relevance of holding your breath just before you release the pouch.

From my experience, lighter band sets are generally best for extended target shooting sessions. Heavier band sets for tin can destruction, etc.

If you are hitting tin cans out at 80 feet most of the time, you're on the right track. :thumbsup: .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
662 Posts
You are getting better sensory feedback from the "THWAK" when the projectile bangs into the metal can. It automatically helps your aim adjust for the next shot.

That's my theory anyway.
dogcatcher seconded. I enjoy shooting at Ragu lids which aren't very big. Because once that round pops it and you see the dents I keep going. I know I'm not the only one who goes "after this shot I'm done for the day....... Well maybe 5 more hits and I'm really done." You just feel better with immediate gratification.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top