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After a great success with the recovered Oak planks from pallets in my last big post, I got an itch and thought I would try polycarbonate (lexan). I had heard really good stories and seen great videos about the strength and toughness of this polycarbonate. I went on Amazon and found a ½" x 1ft x 2ft sheet for $50. It shipped right out of the US and it arrived in less than a week!!

WORKING WITH Lexan:
I was pleasantly surprised that it cut very well with a standard jigsaw with a fine-tooth blade. It works and cut better than oak planks being a little softer and turning sharp Corners better... more like plywood. If you took a very sharp corner or stayed in one spot too long you do get some melting but very minor, nothing like HDPE. Sanding is exactly like working with Oak, it is a hard surface and does not melt unless you stay in one place too long and then it flakes off very easily. Working with Lexan is one of the easiest things to work with other than plywood but way stronger and indestructible!

I wasn't sure what I thought about it being see-through? Thought I would take some 400 grit sandpaper and sand one side to make it opaque. I did a test with some sandpaper and you can definitely rough it up and it has a very nice look to it, it will definitely take a stain or some type of paint very well to give it a color if you wanted to go with that. What I found was that I really liked it being see-through, and I liked that the edges were opaque. My only problem came after about an hour or two when I got my first couple scratches and the fingerprints?? I don't own an iPhone but I'm guessing that's what it's like when you first peel off the front and back and it's perfectly clean. Anyway I let it go and after a day or two the fine scratches were a lot more prevalent and it all just blend it nicely and now I'm used to fingerprints and smudges.

SHOOTING & SIGHTS:
What I like best about this material is that it is dense, and feels solid and heavy in your hand. Definitely feels heavier than oak at the same thickness and it just feels very "tough". On the edges where you sand it has a nice textured feel, not smooth or polished like the face of the slingshot. I actually had to hit it with down to 400 grit sandpaper so that it wasn't too rough and get it feeling just right for grip and smoothness. Nice that you can really adjust that feel and getting it Feeling Just Right. Another great thing is that since it takes no treatment when finished, I found myself going back with the Dremel and hitting with sandpaper several times over the first few days, getting that feeling just right. If I felt a little bit of pressure in a certain place I could hit it with sandpaper just a tiny bit to take that away. It really makes for a perfectly fit slingshot that you probably wouldn't do if you had treated it since you didn't want to have to retreat it.

Shooting off the corner is just perfect, I thought I'd put a fiber optic in the corner but once it was made and cut the whole slingshot becomes a fiber-optic putting the light right into that sharp corner!!? It really lights up that corner really nicely and it makes for attracting your eye.

Toughness test:
I took some of the scrap and made a 25mm spinner. I drilled the hole for the spinner with only about quarter inch of material holding it. So it would be way too little for anything other hard material than a metal spinner. After shooting at it for a month and having 70 or 80 hits on it I can attest to how strong this material is. When you run your finger over the surface of the spinner you can just feel the slight inner bump where the ammo hits. You have to see it in just the right light to see the damage, as in the picture. If you don't get the light just right you can't even tell that there's any dents in it, and after several hits in the same place the dents don't get all that much deeper!? Just a quarter inch holding on the string is more than enough even with hits directly over where the string runs through the spinner. This is very tough stuff it would be almost impossible to break it with a fork hit or even by running it over with a car.

I like polycarbonate better to shoot or work with than anything else I've made or shot... including Micarta, carbon fiber, or Oak.

I've already made nine slingshots of the two varieties that I like best, pictured below. And have them in my vehicle, in my tiny house, and a spare in the garage just in case. Only used half of the sheet and I'm saving the rest because I already have 9 indestructible slingshots that shoot amazingly!

There's my story, give it a try if you want slingshot that is as tough as steel but can be shaped like plywood. As seen in the picture I bought some simple shot clips so that I could put bands or tubes without having to do the wrap and tuck.

Blessings and good shooting everyone! I've been on fire this week since I've found my new release and my shakiness has almost disappeared!! Have a great week everyone!

Vince
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Looks awesome 👏. I know one way to mess it up tho don’t ever spray it with brake clean . We had a windshield on a Yamaha 1200 R seedoo made that stuff . Old trick getting of sticker goo brake clean or wd40 . We sprayed with brake clean and it went all funny in a bad way . But pretty sure you not going spray your frame with that stuff lol . Happy shooting
 

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Guys here's a thing I use for all my targets and I've made alot of slingshots from it and this stuff is bombproof it don't chip or that just gets small indents . I use mains gas pipe I cut it into strips of 50mm x 300mm put about 3 layers then I'm the oven for about 45 minutes take it out roll to bout 30mm then in for 20 minute each side till I'm happy it's ready 💪🎯👊👍👌
 

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After a great success with the recovered Oak planks from pallets in my last big post, I got an itch and thought I would try polycarbonate (lexan). I had heard really good stories and seen great videos about the strength and toughness of this polycarbonate. I went on Amazon and found a ½" x 1ft x 2ft sheet for $50. It shipped right out of the US and it arrived in less than a week!!

WORKING WITH Lexan:
I was pleasantly surprised that it cut very well with a standard jigsaw with a fine-tooth blade. It works and cut better than oak planks being a little softer and turning sharp Corners better... more like plywood. If you took a very sharp corner or stayed in one spot too long you do get some melting but very minor, nothing like HDPE. Sanding is exactly like working with Oak, it is a hard surface and does not melt unless you stay in one place too long and then it flakes off very easily. Working with Lexan is one of the easiest things to work with other than plywood but way stronger and indestructible!

I wasn't sure what I thought about it being see-through? Thought I would take some 400 grit sandpaper and sand one side to make it opaque. I did a test with some sandpaper and you can definitely rough it up and it has a very nice look to it, it will definitely take a stain or some type of paint very well to give it a color if you wanted to go with that. What I found was that I really liked it being see-through, and I liked that the edges were opaque. My only problem came after about an hour or two when I got my first couple scratches and the fingerprints?? I don't own an iPhone but I'm guessing that's what it's like when you first peel off the front and back and it's perfectly clean. Anyway I let it go and after a day or two the fine scratches were a lot more prevalent and it all just blend it nicely and now I'm used to fingerprints and smudges.

SHOOTING & SIGHTS:
What I like best about this material is that it is dense, and feels solid and heavy in your hand. Definitely feels heavier than oak at the same thickness and it just feels very "tough". On the edges where you sand it has a nice textured feel, not smooth or polished like the face of the slingshot. I actually had to hit it with down to 400 grit sandpaper so that it wasn't too rough and get it feeling just right for grip and smoothness. Nice that you can really adjust that feel and getting it Feeling Just Right. Another great thing is that since it takes no treatment when finished, I found myself going back with the Dremel and hitting with sandpaper several times over the first few days, getting that feeling just right. If I felt a little bit of pressure in a certain place I could hit it with sandpaper just a tiny bit to take that away. It really makes for a perfectly fit slingshot that you probably wouldn't do if you had treated it since you didn't want to have to retreat it.

Shooting off the corner is just perfect, I thought I'd put a fiber optic in the corner but once it was made and cut the whole slingshot becomes a fiber-optic putting the light right into that sharp corner!!? It really lights up that corner really nicely and it makes for attracting your eye.

Toughness test:
I took some of the scrap and made a 25mm spinner. I drilled the hole for the spinner with only about quarter inch of material holding it. So it would be way too little for anything other hard material than a metal spinner. After shooting at it for a month and having 70 or 80 hits on it I can attest to how strong this material is. When you run your finger over the surface of the spinner you can just feel the slight inner bump where the ammo hits. You have to see it in just the right light to see the damage, as in the picture. If you don't get the light just right you can't even tell that there's any dents in it, and after several hits in the same place the dents don't get all that much deeper!? Just a quarter inch holding on the string is more than enough even with hits directly over where the string runs through the spinner. This is very tough stuff it would be almost impossible to break it with a fork hit or even by running it over with a car.

I like polycarbonate better to shoot or work with than anything else I've made or shot... including Micarta, carbon fiber, or Oak.

I've already made nine slingshots of the two varieties that I like best, pictured below. And have them in my vehicle, in my tiny house, and a spare in the garage just in case. Only used half of the sheet and I'm saving the rest because I already have 9 indestructible slingshots that shoot amazingly!

There's my story, give it a try if you want slingshot that is as tough as steel but can be shaped like plywood. As seen in the picture I bought some simple shot clips so that I could put bands or tubes without having to do the wrap and tuck.

Blessings and good shooting everyone! I've been on fire this week since I've found my new release and my shakiness has almost disappeared!! Have a great week everyone!

Vince
View attachment 354675 View attachment 354676 View attachment 354677 View attachment 354678 View attachment 354679 View attachment 354680 View attachment 354681
Well you're definitely on the right track.... I've been using lexan/polycarbonate since 2010... done numerous videos on the toughness and versatility of it... and in fact the slingshot you're showing is almost identical to an HTS OTT model I made for proshot back then as well



 
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