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Member, Brotherhood of Slingshot Nutz
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at Martin's latest board cut and instantly recognized the yew he used for the palm swell. I happen to be a lifelong fan of Robin Hood. He and his erstwhile yeomen all had stout bows of yew. I have seen many bows and a few slingshots made of yew on some of the British forums. It would really warm my heart if I could get hold of a hunk of that beautiful stuff to make a slingshot out of. Does it even exist in the U.S.? And if it doesn't, are there any Englismen out there who could get me a piece or a fork of it? Or is there anybody who could tell me where to get some?

I have a burning desire.
 

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Tex-shooter
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The best bow wood ever is Osage orange. Not me saying this, but the experts. They say a bow made of Osage never lost its power with age. It was so cherished by some Indians that they would trade a horse for a bow made of it. You can buy this wood fairly easy in the USA. -- Tex PS here is a picture of a slingshot made from it.
 

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I cant help you with that DH but Ill bet the boys in the shed can.
 

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Yep, I'd check with Fish or go to the Shed and put up a want ad there. I did a brief search and found one place online that carries English yew (Taxus Baccata)domestically, but they have a $300 minimum order...
 

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check ebay...there are a few planks of pacific yew listed.
 

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There you go. I wasn't familiar with Pacific yew, but doing some quick research showed that it is quite similar to the English variety and is used in bows by at least one custom bowyer. A lot easier and cheaper to obtain here in the States as well. Good call, yew guys.


Pacific Yew Bows
 

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Member, Brotherhood of Slingshot Nutz
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have no large pieces at the moment, but I can let you have a piece when I get some more.
Martin.
I now have some on order, they are 150mm x 150mm x 30mm, with very nice grain.
Martin.
[/quote]

Thanks everyone for your help


Martin: that size would be perfect.
PM me with a price and I will give you my addy. Thanks much!
 

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Member, Brotherhood of Slingshot Nutz
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
The best bow wood ever is Osage orange. Not me saying this, but the experts. They say a bow made of Osage never lost its power with age. It was so cherished by some Indians that they would trade a horse for a bow made of it. You can buy this wood fairly easy in the USA. -- Tex PS here is a picture of a slingshot made from it.
All that may be true, Tex, but I'd pit Robin and his bowmen against any tribe of Indians and surely come out winning!
 

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The Cherokee Indian tribe alone was 729,000 strong. I think that if they wanted to comb the woods for Robin and his boys, they would probably find them in their 1.63 square mile forest rather quickly. Unfortunately, If you were referring to comparing their accuracy with a bow, they did not use written language and anyone who's skill might have rivaled Robins has not been written. You would think that it would be an unfortunate venture to go out and hunt a herd of buffalo without being accurate though, wouldn't you? I'm not saying you're wrong, but it seems like your comparing Ted Bundy to the Boogy Man. One has a very clearly defined if somewhat glorified reputation, the other has no accurate recording in history, but a reputation anyways.

Sorry to offtrack the thread...

Here's a link to buy some yew.
English Yew

The only place I could find Osage Orange in anything other than pen blanks was on ebay.
Are there any advantages to using these bowl kits in making slingshots?
Bowl Tuning kits
 

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Tex-shooter
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Hmmm, you are probably right in some settings, especially like when the English used the Yew long bow to rain down arrows from a distance on an oncoming army. The English countryman may have been a superior shot, which we don’t know for sure. The English long bow had a maximum range of about 250 yards and the Yaqui sinew backed Osage bow had a range of about 220 yards. The Yaqui bow was shorter and had a lighter draw weight than the long bow. The American Indian was a really great horseman and could shoot arrows in very rapid succession on horseback. He however was also an accurate shooter and one of the stealthiest fighters that ever lived. You might have had an arrow in your chest or back before you knew he was anywhere around. Although there is no way of proving it, I have been told that my great grandmother was a full blooded Indian slave, purchased by my great grandfather (a French Canadian). The blood line may have been Blackfoot/Yaqui. By the way, I have a stone work axe handed down from her. The other blood in my veins is from England and the Emerald isles so I like both sides of this story. -- Tex
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The Cherokee Indian tribe alone was 729,000 strong. I think that if they wanted to comb the woods for Robin and his boys, they would probably find them in their 1.63 square mile forest rather quickly. Unfortunately, If you were referring to comparing their accuracy with a bow, they did not use written language and anyone who's skill might have rivaled Robins has not been written. You would think that it would be an unfortunate venture to go out and hunt a herd of buffalo without being accurate though, wouldn't you? I'm not saying you're wrong, but it seems like your comparing Ted Bundy to the Boogy Man. One has a very clearly defined if somewhat glorified reputation, the other has no accurate recording in history, but a reputation anyways.

Sorry to offtrack the thread...

Here's a link to buy some yew.
English Yew

The only place I could find Osage Orange in anything other than pen blanks was on ebay.
Are there any advantages to using these bowl kits in making slingshots?
Bowl Tuning kits
Hi, Beau! Yeah but if you want a more "real" example, what about all those ferocious and indomitable Celtic and Teutonic warriors of old Britain who conquered Europe with their long bows of yew? They cleared out whole yew forests in France and Germany to make them. My guess is that if the Indians had yew forests, they would have use yew instead. Who knows?

And, thanks for the link, bud.
 

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Tex-shooter
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I have had both Yew and Osage bows. Yew is an excellent bow wood, but it does not keep its new bow power as well as Osage. Osage bows just don’t lose much with age; in fact some that are 200 years old are still shooting able. Also as a fence post it doesn’t rot and gets harder with age. It is not the best wood for a slingshot however. The American army had a terrible time with a renegade band of Yaqui's even though they had repeating firearms and the Yaqui band only had primitive weapons. The Mexican army had a regiment of Yaqui solders I think I read somewhere. By the way Beau the Indians would ride up along side a buffalo and shoot an arrow into it from about 10 feet (nothing wrong with that for food). -- Tex
 
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