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Went fishing at a local pond today. I was there yesterday frogging, sadly I got nothing yesterday. But while I was there I saw a bunch of carp swimming. I had about an hour and a half so I drove over there. Got a couple of bites but this was the only fish I caught. It weighed about 7-8 pounds. I was using some sweet corn and a small hook.(ignore the weird face I made in the picture)
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Nice spot to have at your disposal!!!
Carp are considered a trash fish here as well but one of the better for catching as far as brute strength goes. Unfortunately , not considered much for dining so some catch them and use them for garden fertilizer. No limit or season on them but the "wanton waste" laws discourage anglers from harvesting them since there's no acceptable way to dispose of them. Some save them for bear/coyote bait which is probably illegal as well.

At one time there was a cat food factory South of here and we went after them with bows and gave the fish to the factory. It was not uncommon after a weekend group outing to have a couple hundred pounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
@Slingshot28 nice catch!

Wondering if the carp is native and what the fishing laws are if they are not?
Thanks, like Henry said their invasive. In Illinois I think your supposed to dispatch them if their in a river. But this was just a pond and I'm almost sure it doesn't lead to a river. I would have probably eaten it but parents did not want the carp in the house this time. Also if I were to dispose of it there would not be a good place to put it.
 

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A chef in one state worked very hard to rename the local carp to something like Silverfin or something like that. He served it at his restaurant where it became a huge hit. Like Henry said they were introduced in the states in the 1800’s and are considered invasive but they were actually brought here to eat. Surprisingly, without knowing that they were carp, diners at the restaurant found picking around the bones to be a treat and thought them quite tasty. When he told them they were carp his patrons couldn’t believe it. I believe I saw that on the show Sunday Morning but could be mistaken. If I have a little time I’ll look up the story. It was pretty interesting if nothing else.
 

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I have heard of a couple of methods for cooking carp but never tried either. One was to remove the mud line(lateral line), fillet and then chop the fillet into small pieces and make a type of patty. The other is to bake them at 350 degrees for an hour on a clean pine board and throw the fish away , then eat the board.
 

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I have heard of a couple of methods for cooking carp but never tried either. One was to remove the mud line(lateral line), fillet and then chop the fillet into small pieces and make a type of patty. The other is to bake them at 350 degrees for an hour on a clean pine board and throw the fish away , then eat the board.
Touché
 

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sounds like the story of "graveyard"trout,wherein the restaraunt would take a trout[?] gut it and put it in a wooden box,after the flys had laid their eggs the box was sealed and kept in a cool dark place for 2 weeks,the eggs hatched,ate the fish,couldnt turn into flys so they kept eating,,,,,each other,until there was only one big one left,the cook would open the box take out the "trout" and cook it it up for some wealthy client,supposed to be considered a delicacy in parts of CO.during the early 1800's :)
 

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sounds like the story of "graveyard"trout,wherein the restaraunt would take a trout[?] gut it and put it in a wooden box,after the flys had laid their eggs the box was sealed and kept in a cool dark place for 2 weeks,the eggs hatched,ate the fish,couldnt turn into flys so they kept eating,,,,,each other,until there was only one big one left,the cook would open the box take out the "trout" and cook it it up for some wealthy client,supposed to be considered a delicacy in parts of CO.during the early 1800's :)
Oh ,,,,,,,,, now that's just rude!! No soup for you!!(n)
 

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I like to catch carp. They will always give a good fight. The biggest one I ever caught was a 17 pounder. I really don't like the taste of carp, but where I grew up in central Illinois many people ate them. Many restaurants had fish fries every Friday night. Carp, catfish and buffalo (the fish) were served. The carp were always scored. Here is a video showing how to score carp.


Another invasive fish is the Asian Carp. These fish jump when a boat passes over. Folks in Central Illinois are trying to keep them from reaching the Great Lakes and turned the effort into a sport.


 

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I like to catch carp. They will always give a good fight. The biggest one I ever caught was a 17 pounder. I really don't like the taste of carp, but where I grew up in central Illinois many people ate them. Many restaurants had fish fries every Friday night. Carp, catfish and buffalo (the fish) were served. The carp were always scored. Here is a video showing how to score carp.


Another invasive fish is the Asian Carp. These fish jump when a boat passes over. Folks in Central Illinois are trying to keep them from reaching the Great Lakes and turned the effort into a sport.


now that looks like fun :)
 
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