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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see some posts lately, asking for advice regarding accuracy, windage and/or elevation issues.

One very overlooked aspect of shooting technique, is collapsing of the pouch arm, either at release, or just before.
You can see a perfect example of collapsing in the video I've linked. If you look carefully, you'll see that my right hand/arm, is moving forward just at release, and this is exactly what collapsing is.

Why is collapsing a problem, you may ask. Well, when we are at full draw, we, ideally, have the bands and pouch in line with the target. In order for the ammo to follow a straight line to our target, the release also has to have correct direction. Direction of the release, obviously, should also be in the direct line to the middle of the target.

Now, when we are at full draw, our muscles that are used for drawing the bands are in tension, keeping everything straight. If we collapse, there is a loss of tension, which is always uncontrollable, so in effect, it introduces variables. The main variables introduced are pouch direction, and release direction.

So, by keeping our focus on muscle tension, by reducing the time it takes to aim, we can alleviate this issue. One good technique is to make sure we constantly drawing back, even if our arm is no longer moving, and allow a slight, natural move backwards of our hand, directly in the opposite direction of the target. This, with practice, will help ensure a clean release, correct release direction, and of course no collapsing.

This goes to show that there are many reasons why a shot misses, or why we get a flyer, but by slowly eliminating the variables, and by focusing on muscle tension throughout the shot, making sure we are still focusing untill the projectile hits the target, we can at least improve our shooting to the point that there is no unexplainable bad shot, and yes, even to the point when we no longer have bad shots, or at least......*very* bad shots... ????
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You think holding at full draw for too long would make this worse?
The proven theory in archery says exactly that, that holding too long is detrimental. The reason is that during the shot process, the majority of our focus should be on form and not aiming. Our attention span is limited, and our ability to focus is limited too. In reality, we can focus for 3 seconds, approximately, so thats how long we should be staying at full draw.
Now, there are situations when we do need the extra seconds. Like when there is windy, or we just dont feel like everything is correct with our shot process.
Taking more time to shoot, when needed, is definitely a good plan, when we know what we are doing, and we are in a level where we can focus on our form no matter what.
The best course of action, when we get a feeling that something is off, is to simply let down and restart our shooting sequence.
There is a saying, "Shoot your form", and thats exactly what it means not to overly focus on aiming but on form. There is proof of that. There is something that happens to all of us, we shoot somewhat badly at 10m, and then we see a tiny sparrow at 40m. We take a quick shot, without thinking, and even if we dont hit it, we get really really close. What happens is that by shooting at a very long distance, quickly, we dont allow ourselves to focus on aiming, instead we rely purely on form!
 

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You think holding at full draw for too long would make this worse?
The proven theory in archery says exactly that, that holding too long is detrimental. The reason is that during the shot process, the majority of our focus should be on form and not aiming. Our attention span is limited, and our ability to focus is limited too. In reality, we can focus for 3 seconds, approximately, so thats how long we should be staying at full draw.
Now, there are situations when we do need the extra seconds. Like when there is windy, or we just dont feel like everything is correct with our shot process.
Taking more time to shoot, when needed, is definitely a good plan, when we know what we are doing, and we are in a level where we can focus on our form no matter what.
The best course of action, when we get a feeling that something is off, is to simply let down and restart our shooting sequence.
There is a saying, "Shoot your form", and thats exactly what it means not to overly focus on aiming but on form. There is proof of that. There is something that happens to all of us, we shoot somewhat badly at 10m, and then we see a tiny sparrow at 40m. We take a quick shot, without thinking, and even if we dont hit it, we get really really close. What happens is that by shooting at a very long distance, quickly, we dont allow ourselves to focus on aiming, instead we rely purely on form!
Wow really interesting :)

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You think holding at full draw for too long would make this worse?
The proven theory in archery says exactly that, that holding too long is detrimental. The reason is that during the shot process, the majority of our focus should be on form and not aiming. Our attention span is limited, and our ability to focus is limited too. In reality, we can focus for 3 seconds, approximately, so thats how long we should be staying at full draw.
Now, there are situations when we do need the extra seconds. Like when there is windy, or we just dont feel like everything is correct with our shot process.
Taking more time to shoot, when needed, is definitely a good plan, when we know what we are doing, and we are in a level where we can focus on our form no matter what.
The best course of action, when we get a feeling that something is off, is to simply let down and restart our shooting sequence.
There is a saying, "Shoot your form", and thats exactly what it means not to overly focus on aiming but on form. There is proof of that. There is something that happens to all of us, we shoot somewhat badly at 10m, and then we see a tiny sparrow at 40m. We take a quick shot, without thinking, and even if we dont hit it, we get really really close. What happens is that by shooting at a very long distance, quickly, we dont allow ourselves to focus on aiming, instead we rely purely on form!
Very good advice!
 

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I see some posts lately, asking for advice regarding accuracy, windage and/or elevation issues.

One very overlooked aspect of shooting technique, is collapsing of the pouch arm, either at release, or just before.
You can see a perfect example of collapsing in the video I've linked. If you look carefully, you'll see that my right hand/arm, is moving forward just at release, and this is exactly what collapsing is.

Why is collapsing a problem, you may ask. Well, when we are at full draw, we, ideally, have the bands and pouch in line with the target. In order for the ammo to follow a straight line to our target, the release also has to have correct direction. Direction of the release, obviously, should also be in the direct line to the middle of the target.

Now, when we are at full draw, our muscles that are used for drawing the bands are in tension, keeping everything straight. If we collapse, there is a loss of tension, which is always uncontrollable, so in effect, it introduces variables. The main variables introduced are pouch direction, and release direction.

So, by keeping our focus on muscle tension, by reducing the time it takes to aim, we can alleviate this issue. One good technique is to make sure we constantly drawing back, even if our arm is no longer moving, and allow a slight, natural move backwards of our hand, directly in the opposite direction of the target. This, with practice, will help ensure a clean release, correct release direction, and of course no collapsing.

This goes to show that there are many reasons why a shot misses, or why we get a flyer, but by slowly eliminating the variables, and by focusing on muscle tension throughout the shot, making sure we are still focusing untill the projectile hits the target, we can at least improve our shooting to the point that there is no unexplainable bad shot, and yes, even to the point when we no longer have bad shots, or at least......*very* bad shots...
This is exactly what I was trying to say the other day about video taping your shooting to see what you are doing wrong. I noted this problem immediately after my first video. Now, that being said, there are some that have learned to compensate for that drop. Since it happens all the time in their shooting and is exactly the same every time, their shooting accommodates the "error" if you will.
 

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Excellent point Skropi. I've noticed this in myself from time to time. I know surprise releases are used in archery to keep from anticipating the release point (although I've never used one myself). I wonder if anyone has tried this with slingshots as well. Either way, great point. I like the idea of working on form and not thinking to much about aiming. I'll try to work on this myself!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I see some posts lately, asking for advice regarding accuracy, windage and/or elevation issues.

One very overlooked aspect of shooting technique, is collapsing of the pouch arm, either at release, or just before.
You can see a perfect example of collapsing in the video I've linked. If you look carefully, you'll see that my right hand/arm, is moving forward just at release, and this is exactly what collapsing is.

Why is collapsing a problem, you may ask. Well, when we are at full draw, we, ideally, have the bands and pouch in line with the target. In order for the ammo to follow a straight line to our target, the release also has to have correct direction. Direction of the release, obviously, should also be in the direct line to the middle of the target.

Now, when we are at full draw, our muscles that are used for drawing the bands are in tension, keeping everything straight. If we collapse, there is a loss of tension, which is always uncontrollable, so in effect, it introduces variables. The main variables introduced are pouch direction, and release direction.

So, by keeping our focus on muscle tension, by reducing the time it takes to aim, we can alleviate this issue. One good technique is to make sure we constantly drawing back, even if our arm is no longer moving, and allow a slight, natural move backwards of our hand, directly in the opposite direction of the target. This, with practice, will help ensure a clean release, correct release direction, and of course no collapsing.

This goes to show that there are many reasons why a shot misses, or why we get a flyer, but by slowly eliminating the variables, and by focusing on muscle tension throughout the shot, making sure we are still focusing untill the projectile hits the target, we can at least improve our shooting to the point that there is no unexplainable bad shot, and yes, even to the point when we no longer have bad shots, or at least......*very* bad shots...
This is exactly what I was trying to say the other day about video taping your shooting to see what you are doing wrong. I noted this problem immediately after my first video. Now, that being said, there are some that have learned to compensate for that drop. Since it happens all the time in their shooting and is exactly the same every time, their shooting accommodates the "error" if you will.
Yep, video taping works wonders! You are right, doing the same thing exactly the same every time, solves most anything, but its a good thing to be aware of such issues in any case!
I am now trying to make a mental....."clicker", so I can get a surprise release when shooting a slingshot. Believe me, just counting to three, and releasing no matter where on the target I am, works wonders! I am still developing the technique though, early stages still hahaha!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Excellent point Skropi. I've noticed this in myself from time to time. I know surprise releases are used in archery to keep from anticipating the release point (although I've never used one myself). I wonder if anyone has tried this with slingshots as well. Either way, great point. I like the idea of working on form and not thinking to much about aiming. I'll try to work on this myself!
That's what I call telepathy lol! I dont shoot compound, I shoot olympic Recurve, so with the clicker my release is always a surprise :)
 

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I see some posts lately, asking for advice regarding accuracy, windage and/or elevation issues.

One very overlooked aspect of shooting technique, is collapsing of the pouch arm, either at release, or just before.
You can see a perfect example of collapsing in the video I've linked. If you look carefully, you'll see that my right hand/arm, is moving forward just at release, and this is exactly what collapsing is.

Why is collapsing a problem, you may ask. Well, when we are at full draw, we, ideally, have the bands and pouch in line with the target. In order for the ammo to follow a straight line to our target, the release also has to have correct direction. Direction of the release, obviously, should also be in the direct line to the middle of the target.

Now, when we are at full draw, our muscles that are used for drawing the bands are in tension, keeping everything straight. If we collapse, there is a loss of tension, which is always uncontrollable, so in effect, it introduces variables. The main variables introduced are pouch direction, and release direction.

So, by keeping our focus on muscle tension, by reducing the time it takes to aim, we can alleviate this issue. One good technique is to make sure we constantly drawing back, even if our arm is no longer moving, and allow a slight, natural move backwards of our hand, directly in the opposite direction of the target. This, with practice, will help ensure a clean release, correct release direction, and of course no collapsing.

This goes to show that there are many reasons why a shot misses, or why we get a flyer, but by slowly eliminating the variables, and by focusing on muscle tension throughout the shot, making sure we are still focusing untill the projectile hits the target, we can at least improve our shooting to the point that there is no unexplainable bad shot, and yes, even to the point when we no longer have bad shots, or at least......*very* bad shots...
First off, I hope this is a useful response.. Aside from a somewhat peripheral reference to the bands, I shoot instinctively. For whatever reason I really like the way Flatband describes the way he worked through the "target panic" issue he was having in the Art of Shootimg section.. specifically the points made about visualizing what the pouch is aimed at.. sorry I can't post a link to it. For reasons made on that thread I've avoided excessive target shooting from fixed positions. Hope this is helpful :)

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