Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I have a nice oak fork that I may have let dry too quickly. It has 3 cracks about 1/2-1" long, and <1/32" wide, that go with the grain. The fork still appears very solid as I've tried to break it with all my strength and with much of my 195 pounds into it. Is it worth finishing and filling the cracks with wood glue or a similar product? Or, should I toss it and try again, letting the next fork dry more slowly?

Thanks for any input and advice.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,676 Posts
fill the cracks and keep working, it will be more than fine.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
341 Posts
Next time you harvest make sure you don't take any bark off the fork until completely dry. I like to leave the bark on where I have the right type. It gives the extra roughness where the grip is needed...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Next time you harvest make sure you don't take any bark off the fork until completely dry. I like to leave the bark on where I have the right type. It gives the extra roughness where the grip is needed...
That was my mistake. I removed all the bark immediately. I have since read that leaving the bark on, sealing the ends and storing the fork away for about 1/2 a year is the way to go. It seems a long process, but in truth, the real time was put in by the tree, taking all those years to grow the fork so nicely.

Thanks all for your help.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,227 Posts
Oak in particular is very susceptible to cracking therefore needs a good dose of patience, I've tried various drying techniques and I think works best is to seal the points and not to remove the crust, bring in the trunk of car slows a bit of waiting.

Dried in a microwave is effective but still run the risk of some cracks emerging.

And of course it's worth filling the crack, you can fill it with the same sanding dust out of wood and then apply locally cyanoacrylate and then polish the area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,110 Posts
If it's a good stable fork it's well worth the effort to fix. Sawdust mixed with epoxy will make a almost invisable repair after sanding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,676 Posts
when i cut a green fork i immediatly seal the cuts with Titebond (woodglue) this forces the evaporation slowly through the bark and prevents cracking. if you seal the fork in this manner and keep it inside (as opposed to a cold gargage) it will be ready to work in two months.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top