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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a plank of 1/4 aluminum , about 6X12. Going to try some PFS out of it. Ive got a PFS in progress ,made from a piece of a alum square. But I used a hack saw , trying to nibble bit s down,, and Ive done the hole drilling all around. Turning out its gonna need a LOT of filing.. I understand Im gonna have to do some serious filing in the end, but is there a jigsaw blade anybody could recommend that I could cut 1/4 and hopefully keep close to the pattern? thanks in advance
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've used these in the past and they seem to work pretty well https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-4-in-8-TPI-Aluminum-Fiberglass-Jig-Saw-Blade-HCS-U-Shank-5-Pack-DW3705H/202550667

I've used the steel ones too without issue. My go to tool when working with metals is a regular old angle grinder with a flap disk. You can remove a lot of material in a short amount of time or be surprisingly precise with it when you wan to.
Do you just sand outside in the wind, or use a serious mask?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·

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I cut all my cores with a scroll saw. Just turn the speed down as low as it will go and use cutting oil. You can cut right on the line and it works very well.
Do you mean the light duty scroll saws made for woodworking with the super thin pinned blades ? Can you tell me what type of metal cutting blade you use - something like this, which is said to be made for cutting non-ferrous metals ? https://www.amazon.com/Proxxon-28745-Scroll-Blades-Toothed/dp/B00B9FIJBM

Thanks !
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I cut all my cores with a scroll saw. Just turn the speed down as low as it will go and use cutting oil. You can cut right on the line and it works very well.
You must have something better than a 100$ scroll saw, The harbor freight one is too much plastic and the actually decent ones are 3 bills +
 

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I'm not sure how many bills mine costs....but it's just an old delta (no plastic) lol. It is variable speed, you have to run it slow because if it gets hot it will gum up and break the blade. But if you run it slow and use lots of cutting oil it works great. I just use Bosch 15 TPI wood blades.

I have vertical bandsaws as well, but for aluminum I mostly use the scroll saw
 

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I'm not sure how many bills mine costs....but it's just an old delta (no plastic) lol. It is variable speed, you have to run it slow because if it gets hot it will gum up and break the blade. But if you run it slow and use lots of cutting oil it works great. I just use Bosch 15 TPI wood blades.

I have vertical bandsaws as well, but for aluminum I mostly use the scroll saw
Nice , I need to quit being so *+=% cheap and get me a decent one
 

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I'm not sure how many bills mine costs....but it's just an old delta (no plastic) lol. It is variable speed, you have to run it slow because if it gets hot it will gum up and break the blade. But if you run it slow and use lots of cutting oil it works great. I just use Bosch 15 TPI wood blades.

I have vertical bandsaws as well, but for aluminum I mostly use the scroll saw
:thumbsup:

Thanks Island Made - appreciate the tip.
 

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I used Bosch T 227 D jigsaw blades to cut out a slingshot frame shape from 5 mm thick aluminum, and would definitely recommend these to you:

https://www.boschtools.com/us/en/boschtools-ocs/t-shank-jig-saw-blades-for-metal-t227d-30858-p/

Well worth their money. As my design was a metal core slingshot, I used a rasp followed by a file to shape the surrounding birch plywood. The rasp will take out chunks of aluminum, so plan using a finer file for the final perfect alignment between the metal core rim and the surrounding wood to avoid crevasses in the metal core (NB: assuming that everything has already been glued & pinned together as needed).

I used 100, 180 and 320 grit sandpaper to process both the wood and metal core surfaces. A thin Dremel steel brush creates a fairly nice finish on the aluminum core: just make sure you do this after the first layer of varnish, etc, as it will be easier to remove the fine aluminum powder that forms when along the edge using the steel brush.

That's how I did it.
 
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