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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off let me say... I was actually looking forward to trying this one out. I thought the design was real nice looking and that it has good clean lines.
A LOT of the time, it's not the slingshot frame's fault but the band and or pouch selection that goes along with it... I don't think that's neccessarily the case here.
I don't have overly large hands... my holding hand (left) is just under 8" in length from middle finger tip to first crease on the wrist... but even though they're not to large, the Jungle Hunter was simply WAY to small for me to use effectively with any kind of decent strength band set.
When gripping the slingshot, there is simply nothing about the design that enhances the shootability or accuracy for me.

In all I was only able to hit the coke can set at 66 feet only 4 times with this slingshot, 2 good hits 2 grazes... which is far below what I've been able to score with every one of my other shooters.

I can not reccommend this slingshot. For me, it ranks at about a 30 out of 100.

 

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Are you holding these slingshots correctly? You said earlier that the A+ was too small for you and now the Jungle Hunter is too small for you too. I have a Jungle Hunter II that fits me perfectly. My hands are the same size as yours. Did you get a Jungle Hunter or a Jungle Hunter II? The II is slightly larger, but not that much.

Are you holding these slingshots with your hand high and fingers up on the forks? The index finger wraps around the fork and the thumb sets up on the fork, pushing forwards. You don't hold them "hammer style" (like a fist, with your thumb wrapping around to touch, or almost touch, your index finger). "Hammer grip" does not work on these slingshots. You *might* be able to get by using hammer grip on the Jungle Hunter II, but that's just a "might". I think it is still a little small for that type of grip.
 

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I just watched part of your video on the Jungle Hunter (it's a little too long for me to sit through the whole thing). Looks like you are indeed holding the forks correctly. Maybe it's just a matter of familiarization and practice with the Chinese style slingshot? I'm just as accurate with my Jungle Hunter II as with my A+ PS-2.

I'm not sure what you have there is a Jungle Hunter either. Yours has the bent fork handle (ergonomic style). That's not a feature listed for the Jungle HUnter on the Dankung website. Did you buy it from www.dankung.com? My Jungle Hunter II is flat, not cured.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just watched part of your video on the Jungle Hunter (it's a little too long for me to sit through the whole thing). Looks like you are indeed holding the forks correctly. Maybe it's just a matter of familiarization and practice with the Chinese style slingshot? I'm just as accurate with my Jungle Hunter II as with my A+ PS-2.

I'm not sure what you have there is a Jungle Hunter either. Yours has the bent fork handle (ergonomic style). That's not a feature listed for the Jungle HUnter on the Dankung website. Did you buy it from www.dankung.com? My Jungle Hunter II is flat, not cured.
Yeah I ordered it from dankung, it took about 2 weeks to get here... it's the one they listed as the jungle hunter. Now, they could have sent the wrong slingshot, that's entirely possible.
I also have some other dankungs ordered as well, a couple of the ergonomic designs that look similar to some of the designs I drew up.

As for getting used to and practicing on the Chinese style slingshots... there's got to be a reason for me to do that first, like the design is better, it's more comfortable to shoot or is superior in some way... so far I don't see a reason to go beyond what I've just done.
 

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As for getting used to and practicing on the Chinese style slingshots... there's got to be a reason for me to do that first, like the design is better, it's more comfortable to shoot or is superior in some way... so far I don't see a reason to go beyond what I've just done.
You may not realize that something is just as good, or better, until you've used/practiced with it enough to understand the differences. But if you really don't want it, I might be willing to buy it off of you. Depends on what you want for it. I can't pay full prices (or rather "won't") because I already have two. So I don't really need another. But if the price is right, I'll buy another anyway! I like them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've had a bit of a think on it, and what I'm going to do is use it for the fork on a slingshot "rifle"... the forks are very strong and it is well made for what it is... it's just not something I can use in the way it was intended. So a slingrifle it will become, one of these days"!
 

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Tex-shooter
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Hey guys, I agree with Bill, I don't like the standard Chinese entrees neither and it’s not because I don't know how to shoot them. -- Tex
 

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In my opinion there is nothing wrong with the dankungs. They just require a different style of shooting.
 

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I don't much like my Jungle Hunter, either. The bands are too short. They are all over the place. There is just no way I have been able to get them to settle into a "sweet spot" on the circular ears. The only time I've been able to get any consistency from it was when I took off the stock bands and tied on a set of Theraband tubes.

I have never been able to get a comfortable grip on it. It's not because of the size, either. I have naturals, board cuts, and bent rods that are smaller and I have no problems with them.

And no, it's not for sale. It will be part of my permanent collection.
 

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Member, Brotherhood of Slingshot Nutz
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I struggled with my Jungle Hunter for a long time before I mastered it. Before I got it, I mostly shot with strong husky natural forks. But I kept shooting with it, trying to learn. Then, I changed the tubes to a longer set and practiced for a while longer. Soon thereafter I mastered it. Now the Jungle Hunter and the PS2 are the two slingshots I shoot best with. I also have an Axe Hunter and another Chinese style G-10 from Ly brand in Hong Kong. I agree with Jim Harris above -- they're just different to shoot and require some time to get used to.
 

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I had the opposite experience with my Jungle hunter. First, I thought it was a tad larger than what I was expecting and I have to choke up a bit to get a good grip. Second, it was the first slingshot I ever owned that let me nail my target dead center the first time I shot it. I use the push-pull and immediate release, just like with my longbows and recurves.
frosty2
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I suggest watch the Dankung videos before you shoot it.

Recently I focus on quick-release shooting , just like this guy won the challenge, not
the guy shown on the following image. :

the quick-release practice is very exciting .


Very exciting experience.
That's some very nice shooting in the video... 10, 12 ounce cans hit at 33' in one minute... that's a hit rate of 1 can every 6 seconds. Watching the video it looked like the winning shooter had a rate of fire at close to 20 shots a minute (really fast) for a percentage of 50%+.

It just seems to me we've GOT to have some shooters here in America that can do better than that... maybe some on this very forum.
 

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well it just might be your not used to it!
the first time i shot my dankung i missed my giant cachbox so bad it hit the wall behind it and lodged a ball into the wall bekind it(lucky i didnt pull all the way back)
but by the weeks end i was just as accutare with it as with any other slingshot even shooting butterfly stance
 

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I am not an expert but I do pay attention to patterns pretty good.

I have noticed with my slingshots of the same perimeter shape, if you will, one being a bit more rounded than the other, this slight difference can make changing cattys an adjustment.

Using a vastly different catty and perhaps style, a person should not find that it seems/feels like the catty has an issue. Wherein, the evidence points to lack of familiarity. Any catty, if used enough a person will get good with that style, perhaps very good with the style. It is a matter of familiarity.

Ok so I should have just posted the last sentence; "It's a matter of familiarity." So shoot me! On second thought.......please don't shoot me!
 

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I suggest watch the Dankung videos before you shoot it.

Recently I focus on quick-release shooting , just like this guy won the challenge, not
the guy shown on the following image. :

the quick-release practice is very exciting .


Very exciting experience.
That's some very nice shooting in the video... 10, 12 ounce cans hit at 33' in one minute... that's a hit rate of 1 can every 6 seconds. Watching the video it looked like the winning shooter had a rate of fire at close to 20 shots a minute (really fast) for a percentage of 50%+.

It just seems to me we've GOT to have some shooters here in America that can do better than that... maybe some on this very forum.
[/quote]

I had same question with you. sometimes I am able to hit about 11 can in one minute , better than that guy won world record.

but I sent my query to the video-poster at youtube.com and got a reply, the winner is about to hit 16 cans of 20 shots in one minute in routine practice.

I realized that none of slingshot shooters are professional athletes, they are kind of nervous to have a public shooting show.

That's probably the reason why the world record was 8 hits in one minute before this guy broke this record.

I dare to say many many shooters in this forum are able to hit more than 8 cans in 1 minute.

anyway, I am very interested in the shooting style,so cool.
 

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They are all over the place. There is just no way I have been able to get them to settle into a "sweet spot" on the circular ears.
On my dankung, I load the pouch and then pull the bands to slight tension directly in line with the forks. Not at a 90 degree angle with the forks like when shooting. After slight tensioning in line, I rotate the forks to the normal 90 degree shooting position. The bands stay perfectly placed for me that way. Symmetrical to each other in position, and they don't move.
 
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