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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have watched numerous video on shooting, some show the need to align your band/tubes on the shot.
Do you guys ensure your doing this each shot?
I have been shooting pretty consistent and took notice of it. Mine at the time was not. I'm starting to try to take notice of it. And find I'm going to have to change my anchor or head position a bit to account this.
I would assume, I will in the long run be more consistent down the road by trying to get a grasp on this now.
Also where do you personally anchor? And do you twist the pouch/rotate your hand at anchor? Thanks
 

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I rotate the pouch about 1/4 turn towards my face and anchor my thumb under my cheekbone. Because I rotate, the bands will be in alignment at the forks, but less aligned as they approach the pouch, due to the twist. I make sure they are aligned at the fork, so I know that I am holding the frame level.
 

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I line one band on top of the other and sight down the bands. I can only see one band. I do not turn the pouch or twist the bands. I start with my thumb on the bottom of the pouch and it stays there through out the draw. I feel I get a cleaner release with the thumb on the bottom.

I anchor the bands right below my eye. I use a draw length of 35 to 50 inches. I barely touch the band to my cheek below my and move them away ever so lightly. The advantage of this method is that when the bands break at the pouch or the fork you can cut and re-tie them to use again. If you use a fixed anchor you have to scrap the band set when they break. The anchor point stays the same.
 

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for shooting BBs my anchor is just below my eye on cheeck,for anything above 1/4 inch i anchor at my ear lobe,as GG said just lightly touching,and i always twist the pouch 1/4 to 1/2 turn,depending on ammo size and target
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys, I was struggling a bit last night while shooting as I was trying different things. I found it threw my point of impact off as to what I have been used to seeing.
I found I had to lay my head over the bands to get them to long up with one another if I wanted to keep the same anchor.
I'm still experimenting with different anchors to find one the feels good and the bands align well for me.
I found it really helps to take pictures to see what's going on, it's sometimes hard to tell by feel alone.
Thanks guys.
 

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Thanks guys, I was struggling a bit last night while shooting as I was trying different things. I found it threw my point of impact off as to what I have been used to seeing.
I found I had to lay my head over the bands to get them to long up with one another if I wanted to keep the same anchor.
I'm still experimenting with different anchors to find one the feels good and the bands align well for me.
I found it really helps to take pictures to see what's going on, it's sometimes hard to tell by feel alone.
Thanks guys.
I've found using a mirror helpful. The trick is to try to get into your regular shooting position without cheating and making adjustments to fix things on the fly so it looks good. You basically want to be aiming at the reflection of your top fork. Once in your regular position, notice your head position, L/R and U/D alignment. Try different anchor points and find one that puts it all together. Don't go into it with a preconceived notion of an anchor point you want to use and then trying to make everything else fit. You should be able to find a naturally comfortable stance/anchor that puts everything in place. I was sure I was going to shoot semi butterfly, but it just didn't work for me (Still messing with it though!). I found my cheekbone anchor and then just shortened the bands to get the ammo speed up. Keep at it and it will come together.
 

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I anchor to just below my lower lip, in the middle. I use a quarter twist. I don't line up one band on top of the other, but I do sight down the top band.

Using this method enlightened me that I was missing to the right or left not so much from alignment, but from a mistake in my release. I had thought previously that my release was solid, but it wasn't. I had assumed that large misses were release, but small misses were alignment. Now I think almost every time I miss left or right it's my release.

I hung a small cord vertically and just shot at that for a few hundred shots so I could eliminate trying to get the elevation correct.. Focusing on my release, I was hitting it regularly. Then I went back to my 1" disc, and tried to shoot not worrying about elevation, just worrying about not missing right to left. I went a lot of shots - 20 to 30, but I didn't count - without missing once left to right. I also got a bunch of hits.

Now I believe that if I take any time at all to ensure good alignment, any left to right miss is my release. Right now the main focus of my practice is to get as close to an infallible release as I can.

I'll worry about elevation later.
 
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