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I have three slingshots that are non brace that I shoot with which are two bunny busters and a cheif aj.I still love shooting with my Trumark FS-1 slingshot. I was just wondering if anyone on the board shoots both? If you do what non braced and braced slingshots you shoot with.
 

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I shoot both, I still like my WRP: it's a dandy. The only bummer is it's a bit limited on capacity of powerful bands, but this limitation is offset by its ability to collapse. I wish it were a hair more ferstout in this regard. but it's a keeper for sure. I notice slingshot people are similar to the black powder crowd in this regard: purists shoot flintlock guns/nonbraced slingshots only. I like to shoot 'em all, I guess!
 

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Well I guess this topic is a reaction to my comment. In the history of slingshot evolution I see tubular bands and wrist braces as devolution. A major step in the wrong direction even if it was commercial success. A step in the wrong direction that has fooled the world for 50+ years. In a post by Tex he talks about how tubular bands took away the power of the slingshot and it wasn't a viable hunting weapon anymore. So you put those slow any heavy pull bands on a slingshot that has forks that rise to high above your hand you've just created a need for a wrist brace. A need created buy poor slingshot design. Maybe that's what the world needed back then (and now), a big bulky sling that looks powerful. Now we live in a world where you can have a pocket sized sling that shoots cannon balls and all it only takes is 3 fingers to hold (thumb and fore finger on the forks and middle finger around handle). A better analogy than the muzzleloader is the comparison of tube vs. solidstate guitar amps. The original guitar amps used tubes (ancient technology) in the 80's there was huge movement towards solid state (commercial success) and now 30 years later we are back to tubes. It's not about being a purist its about realizing that a slingshot never needed a wrist brace in the first place.

Wow I cant wait to see the comments after this post.
 

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TruckeeLocal, I think you are taking a very narrow view of the subject. Some slingshot NEED wrist braces, specifically extended fork slingshots. The Saunders flat band models are top grade slingshots, and use wrist braces because you could not reasonably use them without the brace. Also, all of the tournament winners use braced slingshots because they are more accurate and have less room for error. Bill Herriman's Star models are examples.
 

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I shoot every type Slingshot but my regulars are my Ergo and lately a Vortex Starship that I re-worked. I've suffered from my arm shaking due to a compressed nerve that can take upwards of 3-4 years to properly heal. So that's why the Wrist Brace.I do miss my Ergo though!
Flatband
 

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Brotherhood Of The Slingshot Nutz
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Well then here is my comment: Small diameter tubes are great fun to shoot and are also game getters. Trumark RR-T tapered tubes are surely not devolution. RR-Ts' shoot extremely well and are very available in stores for people to buy. Tubes can also be shot for thousands of rounds which is also a plus to a kid who needs his bands to last.
Many of us are not interested in extreme performance and short band life. We just want a good slingshot to hold and rubber bands attached that we can learn to hit what we aim at and last.
Truckie, you know that Dankung tubes are more than perfect for a great slingshot. You also know that a slice of 1/16" Linatex will also last a long time and give performance that is great for a slingshot. You also know that Trumark RR-T tubes perform very well on anyones slingshot, even rigged over the top like a flat-band.
What makes a person better because he shoots a slingshot at 220 fps when the guy beside him shoots one at 160fps when both are hitting what they aim at and know the performance level of their slingshots?
I don't care about the molecular structure of the rubber I shoot, nor do I care about spending hours inside the house wasting my time trying to get 2fps faster than my buddy. I just want to enjoy shooting a slingshot and the company of others who shoot them.
Don't get the wrong idea that I'm angry at you or that I disagree with what the core of what you are saying is all about. I too would like to shoot a slingshot at 1000fps and have bands that last for 5000 rounds. For that, we need the people who care about the molecular structure of rubber and are willing to spend countless hours doing lab work.
Lets not discourage new shooters with our confusing debates about rubber. I'll admit that all I know is what I have shot myself; and that is to say, that I like the kid approach to slingshot fun and rubber-bands. I am pretty much a dummy when it comes to stuff about rubber on paper...BUT let me get it on my slingshot and I can tell you in a month if it is any good or not and that ends all debate for me. There are good tubes and junk tubes...good bands and junk bands.
Guys like me need the extremists who experiment to get better shooting results, but if we are happy shooting a flintlock and hit what we aim at, I don't see that as devolution.


Oh by the way, If it wasn't for a wrist braced slingshot I never would have been able to get back into slingshots after my injury to my left hand.
 
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I agree about the extended forks, I mentioned that in another post and there are people that need braces like you Smitty to rehab your wrist. What I'm simply trying to point out is that everybody seems so stuck on the wrist brace and there is no real disadvantage for not having one. I made the comment about the tubes because they appeared along with the wrist brace and the heavy pull helped make the wrist brace a necessity. My comment also doesn't refer to dankung tubes, I was referring to the history of slingshot design. I want people to realize that there is more(actually less if you think about it) to slingshots than the ones they have grown up with and if they are going to spend money give it to people like Fish or Flatband or Tex or Tim at Dankung (or other people that deserve the money) and maybe even make their own. Nothing available from the big manufactures even compares to the slings available from these guys. None of my comments refer to tournament shooting either because 99.9% of shooters shoot for fun and will never compete, but don't be surprised when a instinctive Chinese shooter comes over here and schools everyone and they probably wont use a wrist brace. Did Rufus Hussey use a wrist brace?

I'm happy that everyone doesn't agree, this is more interesting than a lot of other topics.
 

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Brotherhood Of The Slingshot Nutz
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I agree about being more interesting! I like to have friendly debates too.
Now I get what you are saying too. It aggravates me that American companies aren't making at least one serious slingshot with serious bands or tubes for tournaments and another serious shooter for hunting. I see most of the factory made shooters as toys for kids, however I may not be aware of the liability issues involved. But, still they could be sold just like a pistol or rifle, if that's the case, where only adults could buy them.
We are lucky to have our custom makers out there to supply us with serious slingshots in addition to the ones we make ourselves.
 
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Well I don't have any handicaps/injuries, etc., and I still like my WRP as well as the ergo. I don't care what you say it is an intelligent, excellent design that is user friendly and accurate. It is just a different style of shooter.
 

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Hi Mr Joel, my comments were not aimed at users of extended fork slingshots. This is the one design that needs the brace and that was the first thing I said but that was under a different topic. This whole thing came about when I was talking to a few members from NY and they both commented about not being able to use wrist braces and my comment was that was good thing. Now they are buying better designed and more powerful slings because of that. So to sum up everything said before, the majority of slingshot shooters (I don't care what type,brand,etc..) could shoot without a wrist brace if your lower the bands close enough to you fingers/hand. This being said, the wrist brace is a result of a slingshot design that has the forks rise too high creating excessive torque(bad design). Tubes that were hard to draw also had a factor in this as well. So now it's 50+ years later and people still use a slingshot that was a bad design then and its still a bad design now.
 

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Truckee, I would not agree with your point about wrist braced slingshots and tubes as being devolution in the history of slingshots. They were simply a necessary step in the progression to what we have today. You must look carefully at the transition to tubes commercially, and the beginning of the transformation back (Saunders and custom makers) to understand the real picture. You see, the early flat bands- the ones displaced by the introduction of the wristrocket were gum rubber- which you can still get form Flataband and Tom at Bunnybuster. These .0625" bands were not all that great, topping out around 240 fps with a 3/8" steel ball on a normal draw and non-extended fork. But their durability is not great either; comparable, or maybe slightly better than thin latex used today. But the tubes that replaced them were indeed considerably more durable. Beyond that, the tubes were made of latex- an evolution in the sport, not devolution. These tubes, the first ones of course were not tapered, still gave high speeds and lasted much longer- an improvement to the commercial aspect of the product. (It may be argued that a less durable band would be preferred by companies because it would require more purchases of replacements, but they probably felt overall that more enjoyment and thus more sales of slingshots would result from the longer band life.) This is related to your argument about the high fork as being another setback. I, like many, really got into slingshots with my first wrist-braced model, a Saunders Folding Falcon. The wrist brace allows for youngsters to develop proper form, without fear of hitting their fingers, which would be more probable on a non-wrist-braced model with lower forks. Not to mention the wrist strength needed to shoot it (even with light bands). This was another calculated commercial plot to reduce liability I presume.
But I would like also to get more down and dirty about performance. I honestly see no speed difference between Trumark RRTs and tapered latex flat bands. Yes, it did take a while to produce these RRTs, and the majority of tubes sold in the last 60 years have been inferior to these. Though I haven't tested them thoroughly, I know that a Trumark RR1 has enough power to penetrate the skin of a squirrel with a lead ball at 20 yards, and kill it instantly. As for the RRTs (which I know you espouse), if they are shortened and fitted with a lighter pouch, can get up to 290 fps with 3/8" steel and a normal draw, and just over 300 fps with 5/16" steel. I am also not convinced with the notion of flat bands superiority over tubes in colder weather. I do believe that most commercial slingshots are sold with tubes that are too long for most shooters, and should be shortened to optimize speed. But the durability superiority of tubes should not be overlooked, and is important to the recreational shooter.
As for the original question in the thread, yes I do still shoot wrist-braced slingshots, mainly a Crosman Cyclone and a Saunders SR-7. I must admit that I more commonly shoot my Bunnybuster Pocket Shooter, Flatband Ergo, or some of my own naturals, equipped with you guessed it; .030 latex tapered flat bands. I must say that they go draw smoother than tubes, and I feel they are more accurate.
 

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i used to shoot braced but now i have taken the brace of i like it better like this not as big and overall its better
 

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Thought I would mention to Alru, I shoot Linatex 1/16 inch thick x 5/8 inch at fork and 1/2 inch at pouch and I think they are a very good rubber to shoot with.
I shoot RR-T tubes a lot also and I always measure each new set to my draw length before Installation and shorten them where they won't stretch anymore about three inches past my anchor point. I too think they shoot amazingly well and very fast. I would like to see a chronograph test with the RR-T set up the way I shoot it with a 28 inch draw.
Rigged to shoot over the top, RR-T's shoot so well that I honestly didn't see the point of switching to flat-bands only a year ago when I started shooting again. Flatband and Tex helped me a lot to get my stuff rigged right and once I did, I was happy with my target groups and very content with the performance of a tuned set of RR-Ts.
The only problem I have noticed is the RR-T taper will vary in diameter at the pouch from one set to another and it feels like you have to get used to every new set you put on when finding the bulls-eye.
 

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Hi all,
I still own and shoot (amongst others obv!)a wristbraced. A Barnett black widdow. Nostalgic reasons, had one as a kid. Still pretty accurate with it too!
I didn`t think of it before but the design flaws are obvious when pointed out, thus leading to an un-needed and heavy arm brace.
 

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OK, here my two cents worth on wrist braces. First, yes I still shoot some wrist braced slingshots as well as some non-wrist braced slingshots. The ones that I shoot are the Saunders Falcon 2 (flat band model), the Saunders Wrist Rocket Pro and a few of my own design. Before I shot the Falcon 2, I changed the angle of the wrist brace, put a cushion pad on the wrist brace pad and add a high density foam grip to the handle (I had to cut down the handle base some to get the grip on). Most of the commercial wrist braced slingshots have several main problems. 1) One size just does not fit all. 2) The wrist brace is too short. 3) Hand through the wrist braced styles are clumsy (I hate this style). 4) The wrist brace pad is too small, hard and don’t lay flat against your arm. When I am shooting a non wrist braced style I like the Saunders flat band Hawk and a few of my own design. I like flat bands over tubes. I might not even be a shooter if I had to shoot tubes. Tex
 

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I don't shoot any wrist braced slingshots. I had a couple, a Saunders WRP and a Barnett pro. I traded both of them. When I was a teenager I carried a wham-o hunting slingshot on my trapline and it worked very well for that. One day while reading Fur Fish & Game I saw an add for a wrist rocket slingshot, so I ordered one and carried it a couple of days and went back to my wham-o. I just didn't like it and it didn't perform as well. I guess from that experience 47 years ago I just don't care for them.
 

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Well first of all my comments weren't about the merits of tubes. Heavy pull tubes were just a factor in the wrist brace design. I referred to the wrist brace design as devolution because it became the norm and many slingshots were based on this design. It sent all the manufacturers down the wrong road when they could have making better slingshots. Yes these slings were a commercial success, but I'm not talking about that.

Everything I have said is based on slingshot design and nothing else. Since everybody keeps commenting about tubes, that tells me that people are missing the point of what I've said.

I want people to think! I'm hoping people will read these posts and think about what a slingshot really is. It's sad to see, that with the wealth of information available on this forum and other forums, that many people haven't learned a thing.
 
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