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I have a Dremel clone here but I have not used it on wood - Jenny and I drilled some beach pebbles and shells with it, with a diamond bit, under water.

It goes up to 30,000 rpm.

I want to try it to shape the [well dried] tree fork wood of a new catapult. The wood is sycamore I think, white and quite hard and strong.

If so, how does it compare with knives, rasps and 40-grit sandpaper-glued-to-wood?

For handheld use, for shaping not engraving, would you favour router bits:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/283084343993?ViewItem=&item=283084343993&ppid=PPX000608&cnac=GB&rsta=en_GB(en_GB)&cust=92Y42420X3526260T&unptid=e9d3df54-1694-11e9-a894-441ea1477c68&t=&cal=e1d43850d3f1f&calc=e1d43850d3f1f&calf=e1d43850d3f1f&unp_tpcid=email-receipt-auction-payment&page=main:email&pgrp=main:email&e=op&mchn=em&s=ci&mail=sys

or multi-edge cutters:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/20pc-HSS-Router-Bits-Wood-Cutter-Milling-Fits-Dremel-Rotary-Tool-High-Quality-UK/401654911364?LH_BO=1&hash=item5d847f9184:g:au8AAOSwRfxcD4b9:rk:12:pf:0

Or burrs/rasps:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/New-5Pcs-Set-6mm-Drills-Bits-Wood-Carving-Micro-Cutter-Rotary-Burr-Dremel-Tools/132193732921?hash=item1ec75c4939:g:1fYAAOSwuMZZGsdO:rk:8:pf:0

I'll look on YouTube too, there is plenty of advice on there.

Mike
 

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Hi Mike,

I use those "multi-edge" type bits. usually the larger the better. Tried but pointy versions were useless for me. The big spherical or pear like shapes where the butt of the pear is the working area is better. Too small tools may tear up the wood.

My favorite is the second from the left on this image: https://www.amazon.com/Tough-Alloy-Working-Dremel-Rotary/dp/B00HJ4JQKA

You can carve under-turns and cavities with that. The conic sides helps to use it more accurately then a simple sphere. Sphere is better for carving organic shapes where you are switching directions more frequently.

I'm also using a Dremel knockoff for over ten years without a problem. Just make sure you start with a test piece. Need no crank up speed. It will be better on the hands too. Some frequencies kills the wrist, find whats comfortable.

Have fun, test and wear a glass :)

Mark
 

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I find using hand held wood rasps to be the best way of getting the shape 99% there.

Then the larger sized sand paper rotary dremmel drum will do the rest.

However I have started to use hand files instead of late.

Either or imho.

The little metal cutters I find usless,they rebound and catch,drag and ruin decent wood.

Don't forget a mask of some kind if using the sanding drums !

Have fun it's quite addictive,,,,eh Matt? :)
 

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The sanding drums treefork suggested are all All I use. I like to make band grooves with the top edge and finish with a small round file.

Sent from my SM-T280 using Tapatalk
 

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I do a great deal of wood shaping (albeit not on slingshots) with my Dremel, and those multi-cutter bits really are great. Mine is a straight cylinder, but I use it mostly for scroll saw intarsia; different needs in that regard. The only thing I can really add to the excellent advise above is that, in my experience, they can cause tearout on soft (spalted woods, alder, holly, etc) woods, particularly endgrain, which is where the sanding drums do better.
 

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I do a great deal of wood shaping (albeit not on slingshots) with my Dremel, and those multi-cutter bits really are great. Mine is a straight cylinder, but I use it mostly for scroll saw intarsia; different needs in that regard. The only thing I can really add to the excellent advise above is that, in my experience, they can cause tearout on soft (spalted woods, alder, holly, etc) woods, particularly endgrain, which is where the sanding drums do better.
DC mentioned what I neglected to, they can bite from time to time so I keep mine at a fairly high speed and take my sweet time.

Sent from my SM-T280 using Tapatalk
 
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I'm with treefork as well on this one - The Sanding drums with a variable speed machine does it for me.

I usually start off with very coarse grit to get down to the basic shape. I find the coarse cut to be quick and accurate. I then finish off with the least aggressive grit.

Initially, I found out the hard way - It is very easy to get carried away and over cut and spoil the job, so I learnt very quickly to pencil in the limits for the rough initial cut.

Be prepared for a lot of dust, the very fine stuff - I use a box fan with a couple of furnace filters taped to the inlet side for dust control.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi Mike,

I use those "multi-edge" type bits. usually the larger the better. Tried but pointy versions were useless for me. The big spherical or pear like shapes where the butt of the pear is the working area is better. Too small tools may tear up the wood.

My favorite is the second from the left on this image: https://www.amazon.com/Tough-Alloy-Working-Dremel-Rotary/dp/B00HJ4JQKA

You can carve under-turns and cavities with that. The conic sides helps to use it more accurately then a simple sphere. Sphere is better for carving organic shapes where you are switching directions more frequently.

I'm also using a Dremel knockoff for over ten years without a problem. Just make sure you start with a test piece. Need no crank up speed. It will be better on the hands too. Some frequencies kills the wrist, find whats comfortable.

Have fun, test and wear a glass :)

Mark
Thanks, that is all very helpful, especially the link to the shape you like best.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I find using hand held wood rasps to be the best way of getting the shape 99% there.

Then the larger sized sand paper rotary dremmel drum will do the rest.

However I have started to use hand files instead of late.

Either or imho.

The little metal cutters I find usless,they rebound and catch,drag and ruin decent wood.

Don't forget a mask of some kind if using the sanding drums !

Have fun it's quite addictive,,,,eh Matt? :)
Thanks, the sanding drums seem to be a popular choice. Some people seem to like the multi-edge cutters though.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I do a great deal of wood shaping (albeit not on slingshots) with my Dremel, and those multi-cutter bits really are great. Mine is a straight cylinder, but I use it mostly for scroll saw intarsia; different needs in that regard. The only thing I can really add to the excellent advise above is that, in my experience, they can cause tearout on soft (spalted woods, alder, holly, etc) woods, particularly endgrain, which is where the sanding drums do better.
Thanks, very helpful.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm with treefork as well on this one - The Sanding drums with a variable speed machine does it for me.

I usually start off with very coarse grit to get down to the basic shape. I find the coarse cut to be quick and accurate. I then finish off with the least aggressive grit.

Initially, I found out the hard way - It is very easy to get carried away and over cut and spoil the job, so I learnt very quickly to pencil in the limits for the rough initial cut.

Be prepared for a lot of dust, the very fine stuff - I use a box fan with a couple of furnace filters taped to the inlet side for dust control.

Cheers!
Thanks, very helpful. And the reminder about dust is very important too, I had not thought about that, I must look up "box fan" and "furnace filters". Collecting the dust rather than blowing it away makes sense.

Mike
 

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I'm with treefork as well on this one - The Sanding drums with a variable speed machine does it for me.

I usually start off with very coarse grit to get down to the basic shape. I find the coarse cut to be quick and accurate. I then finish off with the least aggressive grit.

Initially, I found out the hard way - It is very easy to get carried away and over cut and spoil the job, so I learnt very quickly to pencil in the limits for the rough initial cut.

Be prepared for a lot of dust, the very fine stuff - I use a box fan with a couple of furnace filters taped to the inlet side for dust control.

Cheers!
Thanks, very helpful. And the reminder about dust is very important too, I had not thought about that, I must look up "box fan" and "furnace filters". Collecting the dust rather than blowing it away makes sense.

Mike
I forgot to mention dust is a problem . It's messy ! Wear a mask for sure . I do this outdoors to avoid the the mess . It's a super fine dust that goes air borne and settles every where . If you have to do it indoors a good dust collection system is a must .
 

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Love my Dremel! Couldn't live without it. I use the structured carbide bits and the sanding drums-fine and coarse. Does a great job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm with treefork as well on this one - The Sanding drums with a variable speed machine does it for me.

I usually start off with very coarse grit to get down to the basic shape. I find the coarse cut to be quick and accurate. I then finish off with the least aggressive grit.

Initially, I found out the hard way - It is very easy to get carried away and over cut and spoil the job, so I learnt very quickly to pencil in the limits for the rough initial cut.

Be prepared for a lot of dust, the very fine stuff - I use a box fan with a couple of furnace filters taped to the inlet side for dust control.

Cheers!
Thanks, very helpful. And the reminder about dust is very important too, I had not thought about that, I must look up "box fan" and "furnace filters". Collecting the dust rather than blowing it away makes sense.

Mike
I forgot to mention dust is a problem . It's messy ! Wear a mask for sure . I do this outdoors to avoid the the mess . It's a super fine dust that goes air borne and settles every where . If you have to do it indoors a good dust collection system is a must .
Thanks, yes, I hate dust.

Mike
 
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