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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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The RCC General is a prime example of a slingshot with a narrow fork width (90 mm). It has a 50 mm fork gap with 30 mm depth.

I've been obsessing about fork width. Obviously, that's a huge issue with TTF slingshots. The narrower the fork width, the less you have to hold over and obscure your target. 85 mm fork width seems about as small as you can comfortably go with a full-sized slingshot. That forces a small fork gap, usually around 50 mm.

It seems a 95 mm fork width is super standard on a lot of TTF slingshots. Very many of mine are. It's probably a good compromise.

Out I come with the ruler. I don't have all that many slingshots, 16 I think, maybe more. My smallest fork width for a TTF is 85 mm and my largest is 125 mm. When it comes to fork with, 10 mm makes a huge difference. Even 5 mm makes a huge difference. It's hard to believe I never gave it much thought.

I've been concentrating on smaller fork widths lately and it's led to a break-through. In a previous post, experienced members of the forum pointed out that fork gap wasn't important, fork width was. That stuck with me.

A consistent anchor-point is hard to give up. It's easier to just give it some Kentucky windage than change anchor point. Many of us suffer from having to hold over our target, obscuring it. The result is, you have to guess a little. A narrow fork width changes that.

If some of you out there have reached a plateau in your TTF shooting. Try a slingshot with a 90 mm fork width or smaller. A little thing makes a huge difference.
 

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Many of my forks are well under 80mm wide Some are even around 60... Though the wider the forks are the easier it is to line the bands up accurately and the better it shoots. Obviously the width of the fork has a lot to do with hand dimensions. Fork widths between 80-100mm would be the norm. If I wanted a target specific shooter I'd probably want them as wide as possible.

Bill Hays did a video some time ago about fork width and band elongation - think his finding was around 4" was about the most ideal.
 

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I hear what you are saying Uath. I have a little TTF Dobbers F1 with a 90mm width and it's a joy to shoot. I can still anchor on my ear and not block the target at 20 yards. For TTF I like 90mm but plan to try a bit less when I get a chance.

I also prefer a narrow width for OTT frames. Last summer I spent some time shooting gongs at 30-75 yards with an OTT with an 84mm width. A 100mm+ width wouldn't have worked for me. My anchor would have been off the bottom of my ear.

A little over 10 years ago I started making OTT frames. The first batch were around 110-115mm wide. They were fine for upright fork shooting. When I switched over to sideshooting I discovered the benefit of less width. I eventually settled on 75-85mm as my preferred. I have tried as narrow as 63mm (sideshooting) but my accuracy falls apart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can't even imagine a 60 mm fork width! Is that on a full sized slingshot? Like one you can get all your fingers on? Please post a picture.

I guess all this is important to me because I shoot at longer distances. That's not bragging, don't get me wrong. I'm a decent shot, but Annie Oakley wouldn't even bother to watch.

It's always warmer here in South Georgia and I live in the woods. It just seems that when you're outside and have all the room you want, you go longer and longer. It's just fun to me, like an ancient archer. I live in a fantasy world, but the hits mean more.

I habitually stand at 20 meters and over. I never stand at 10 meters. I need to. You stand far away and get to thinking that 10 meters will be super easier somehow... It isn't... I need to start practicing at that distance. I would like to enter a tournament someday.

By the way, if one would put realism into slingshot hunting, the normal distance to shoot at anything would be 20 meters. If you're lucky. I don't know about rabbits, squirrels, dove, and quail, other places, let alone turkey and pheasant if they're legal, but they don't like it when you get close to them. Daniel Boone couldn't sneak up on anything around here anyway. You can't move without noise. A squirrel can sound like a rhinoceros coming.

Ambush hunting, like from a tree, or ground, stand, would be your best bet. Even then, 10 meters is a pipe dream.

I don't know. That sounds like a long way for a definite kill shot. I wounded a deer once with an arrow... once. That was the end of archery hunting for me. Humane is a 30-06. I will never wound an animal again if I can help it. Hunting is fine, not wounding.

I hear archery hunters all the time talking about how they, "Stuck one that ran off."

Makes me sick. I've got to think long and hard before I shoot at anything with a slingshot.

So, to make a long story short, those of us who like to shoot at over 15 meters, should at least look into a TTF with a narrow fork width.
 

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Great Post! I shoot TTF almost exclusively and have been enjoying the 90mm fork width for about the last year or so. I'm still shooting 100mm wide frames like my Lewis Pride Scorpion but I think I really warmed up to the 90mm when I did my 1 month mono-sling challenge using the MS Hunter. Started with the RCC General like you have there @Uath. I put some flip clips on it and found it to be a nice setup. Next came the MS Hunter and I have had a hard time putting it down ever since! I had Sharpshooter JD create one of his bent forged frames at a 90mm width and I think it's fantastic!

I'd have to go measure the forks but I'm pretty sure one of my smaller frames(MetroGrade Hydra TTF/OTT) is about a 75mm width and its fun to plink with. Just have to adjust my anchor point a bit higher when aiming.
 

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As requested, here are some pics of 64mm and 58mm frames. I also have a couple of 63mm that look like the 58 but slightly wider and longer. I have shot them all gangsta style. The 58mm and 63mm did quite well at 20 yards with a high ear anchor, light bands and BBs. The 64mm will get outdoor exercise once the snow melts. These are fun frames for 10-20 yards. When I was shooting 30-75 yards I used 83mm width on a homemade OTT Jelly Bean frame.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Remember now, we're talking TTF. All those cool little guys above are OTT.

What's the smallest fork width you have TTF???
 

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These ABS resin pincher frames were under $4 each so I bought 3 of them. The one below is banded up for 1/4" steel and shoots great. The other two are banded up for 5/16" steel.

This cheapo frame sits low in the hand and allows a straight wrist hold. It's a comfortable frame and I find that it contributes to accuracy. This is one of my most accurate shooters. I like it so much that I ordered a stainless steel pincher frame with the same fork width & gap. Hopefully it will shoot and feel just as nice.

Yup, the clamps are on the wrong side of the fork. If they bend or loosen up then I might get a cheek smack from the band. I check them periodically and all is well. The ABS seems thick and strong enough for my needs. I never shoot much over 9 pounds and prefer 5-8 right now.

Edit: My mistake. Unfortunately I only have one TTF frame and it's 90 mm. With an OTT pincher frame I don't flip so the ball still has to pass through the top of the fork gap.

Width = 80 mm

Gap = 40 mm

Length = 112 mm
 

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