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What are the key factors for you in deciding what slingshot you purchase. I’ve always wondered if someone was to lay several different sizes and styles of slingshots on a table and you were blind folded, so you picked your choice by feel, not appearance and or style. I almost never buy the pair of shoes that I like the style of, due to incorrect fit, the one that fits the best usually is plain looking, but they fit????
 

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Oh so many parameters in place.

Of course it has too fit my hand and shooting style.

On a personal note I like pocketability as a top factor. Not fof concealing my flip, but for.comfortable carry (shirt pocket).

I current like gappers or pfses... OTT has become my favored style since I have returned to instinctive shooting.

But I can shoot TTF. I prefer flat bands to tubes, but just barely. And Roma tabs on most frames.

As far as price...if i
an item is too expensive I am reluctant to use it. So I make a lot of my flips or trade/buy with other makers.

My top 3 for beginners right now are-

1. My custom LBS with foregrip.
2. My own build of a Y Pocket Shooter by Dragon Master/Dayhiker.
3. Bill Hays No.5 Boyshot core with just a thin paracord wrap.
 

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A lot of people are going to have different opinions on this... but here's mine...

If you are a beginner, choose one with a fork size and gap that are forgiving enough to accommodate imperfections in release so that you minimize fork hits... something with Universal Forks with a fork gap of at least two inches is a good starting point to look at... Hathcock Target Sniper, Simple Shot Scout, TacHammer and S.E.R.E. are all great beginner slingshots.

Universal Forks are great for trying out different elastics and different configurations of attachment.... OTT, TTF, tubes etc. etc...

BUT dedicated for the purpose forks are always going to be just a little better once a person knows what they prefer... AND as the user gets to be more advanced, with a better, cleaner release, smaller slingshots may become a fun option to explore... BUT if you go to small to quick, then it's more than likely a new user will get discouraged.
 

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I like slings I can wrap my fingers around, as long as I don't get a pinch from shooting it I am happy. I have shot some that seemed to cause my hand to cramp and that really isn't fun. My main thing would be thumb support/comfort. If my thumb doesn't fit/grip well, its prop not the sling for me lol.
 

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Good question. I like to think that I am about feel, how I can shoot it. The trouble is the only places I know of to purchase slings. I have to pick with my eyes then hold a week later. So I can tell you what I thought I would enjoy shooting has turned into something in a bag on my shelf. While what I truly enjoy shooting took a few more orders, or even better a few more hrs of work. I am not interested in a lot of flash. I want to shoot, put in my pocket, enjoy, not be afraid to let my daughters shoot it.
 

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yeah, I am just adding to the list.

Axiom and champ and torque are definitely (maybe the best) great for beginners.
 

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I like to wear vests. One of the conditions for choosing one is that the right side pocket must be able to hold a Scorpion. If it will I know it'll house any of the others apt to find itself on a walk. I do however, appreciate one feeling 'right' in my hand, and having the option of being used with bands at least 3/4" wide, or tubes, so the Top Shot, Universal Boyscout, SERE by Pocket Predator are great, and so are the all Ocularus models, Torque by Simpleshot, as was mentioned by J3ff.
 

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I'm always torn between the best fit for my hand, pocket, bands, ammo, style, tools, materials, mood... It's a never ending compromise with too many things to list. :rofl:

But I think I'd be pretty happy with anything OTT, 3-4" wide, 4-6" long, 1/2" - 1" thick, with a narrow waist that's not too off center, and shoulders wide enough to brace my thumb on.
 
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Grandpa Pete
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A couple of years ago I had a motorcycle accident and screwed up my left had. Actually screwed together my thumb. After it healed I discovered I could not shoot any of the slingshots I had been using. Big Dan Hood read about my problem on the Forum and volunteered to design and build a slingshot that I could shoot. Dan is an engineer and a very creative guy. It it were not for m

him I would have given up on slingshots. You can't beat aq custom, hand made slingshot made especially for you.

GP
 

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I went down the challenging D.I.Y making route several years before eventually buying a few pinch-grip style Chinese slingshots: they are supremely accurate at 10 yards.

From the start, my priority was to have a sturdy (safe!) and ergonomic frame design : this involved experimenting with various shapes designed using the "draw" function of MS Word (no, not the most appropriate software) and cutting out numerous cardboard shapes to see how specific designs fitted my hand prior to making the actual birch plywood board cuts. My focus was on the pinch-grip style to minimize wrist torsion while nevertheless having something aesthetic at the end of the process.

Turning homemade cold bent metal rod slingshots into ergonomic shooting tools suitable for flat bands was a further significant challenge: I've made countless beech wood grips to find what suited me best.

Ultimately, I would look at how well a slingshot feels in the holding hand, and how well I can shoot with it before looking at the fancy style of a given design on the market. In terms of fork width, I have a preference for anything between 5 to 7 cm (1.96 to 2.75 inches). There are truly some very interesting pieces of artistic slingshot work out there, but not all are necessarily very practical as shooting tools.
 
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