Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Long time lurker first time poster.

I love hobbies where you aim object X and make it go from point A to point B as quickly and accurately as possible, specially if they involve spending 10x the time and money doing it yourself rather than just buying it.

I've wanted to make a slingshot for years but always found a reason to make it impossible. There no good trees around where I live. Tons of softwood, but no fruit grooves or hardwoods around. Then I started watching videos, and it was clear that without a planer, a bandsaw, a spindle sander, a router, another 10,000 pieces of equipment and finishes, and 15 years of experience it is impossible to build a slingshot.

Three days ago a storm felled a huge old Primavera (Cybistax donnel-smithii) tree down the block and left me with no electricity or internet at home for 24 hours. I had a chunk of leftover wood, I believe it is Parota (Enterolobium cyclocarpum) from when a carpenter build a table for the neighbors, my drill was charged and my hacksaw, rasp and sandpaper are powered by elbow grease. The only way to stay sane for 24 hours without internet access was to build something.


This is the chunk of wood and my tools, minus the cordless drill.
352775


This is after main shaping and sanding.
352777


This is it finished with beeswax and oil. These are the clay balls I like to shoot. Locally sourced clay shaped by hand and thrown into the grill whenever I have a barbecue, to take them somewhere between dried mud and properly made terracota.
352778


These are a couple of details to make it fit my hand better.
352782


352783


I am already seeing so many things to improve: symmetry, ergonomics, band attachment, the bands themselves, overall size, quality of the sanding and finishing... at least it is very accurate with the 2 gram clay balls at 10 meters. I can't wait to start the second one.

Thank you for looking and for the inspiration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,354 Posts
That looks like a mighty fine frame indeed!
You could make a frame from the fork of softwood, the direction of the grain makes them strong enough. Cut one to the size you need and grab each fork and see if you can break it, good luck and keep up the good work!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Work in progress with some crooked natural forks also picked up from a brush pile. I am trying to get permission from the owner to pick some better forks from his backyard grove, but he is being skeptical. He has guavas, different citrus, and cauhmochitl (

This time only using a couple of Mora knives I’ve had for years and sandpaper.

The small one is strawberry guava (Psidium cattleyanum), one of my favorite fruits. The larger one is from pink fleshed guava (Psidium guajaba)

352923
 

·
Read Only
Joined
·
0 Posts
Long time lurker first time poster.

I love hobbies where you aim object X and make it go from point A to point B as quickly and accurately as possible, specially if they involve spending 10x the time and money doing it yourself rather than just buying it.

I've wanted to make a slingshot for years but always found a reason to make it impossible. There no good trees around where I live. Tons of softwood, but no fruit grooves or hardwoods around. Then I started watching videos, and it was clear that without a planer, a bandsaw, a spindle sander, a router, another 10,000 pieces of equipment and finishes, and 15 years of experience it is impossible to build a slingshot.

Three days ago a storm felled a huge old Primavera (Cybistax donnel-smithii) tree down the block and left me with no electricity or internet at home for 24 hours. I had a chunk of leftover wood, I believe it is Parota (Enterolobium cyclocarpum) from when a carpenter build a table for the neighbors, my drill was charged and my hacksaw, rasp and sandpaper are powered by elbow grease. The only way to stay sane for 24 hours without internet access was to build something.


This is the chunk of wood and my tools, minus the cordless drill.
View attachment 352775

This is after main shaping and sanding.
View attachment 352777

This is it finished with beeswax and oil. These are the clay balls I like to shoot. Locally sourced clay shaped by hand and thrown into the grill whenever I have a barbecue, to take them somewhere between dried mud and properly made terracota.
View attachment 352778

These are a couple of details to make it fit my hand better.
View attachment 352782

View attachment 352783

I am already seeing so many things to improve: symmetry, ergonomics, band attachment, the bands themselves, overall size, quality of the sanding and finishing... at least it is very accurate with the 2 gram clay balls at 10 meters. I can't wait to start the second one.

Thank you for looking and for the inspiration.
Really nice fork and very nice timber, very tight grain pattern which would look well anywhere, well done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
Thank you for the encouragement.

I am already working on a natural one from a strawberry guava (Psidium cattleyanum) branch I found in a garden waste pile on my way to buy coffee.

I guess one never looks at brush piles and compost piles the same way after getting into this hobby.
Nice work. That is an interesting looking wood. I do the same with brush piles now too, always looking for suitable Y's.
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top