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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently working on my release and my follow through. What I've noticed for some time now, is that there are a number of ways to follow through with the hand holding the frame.
Three variations that I've tried are 1. Holding the frame as steady as possible. This tends to throw the shots if movement is introduced unwittingly.
2. Flipping on purpose. This works a bit better, but it still introduces some inconsistencies in my shooting.
3. Using an Olympic archery type of follow through, letting the frame follow the shot freely. When done properly this has given me the best results.

Are there other ways to go about it? What type of follow through are you using guys and why?
 

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I always go for number 3 if possible. It's the easiest for me to get right. Brace the forks, hook the waist, loose hold with the frame parallel to the target, and done. Some frames just don't have a good pivot point so then I go with number 1. Pointing the forks at the target with a tweak at the pouch seems to do about the same thing for me as a natural flip, but requires a little more practice/muscle memory to get just right. I've caused myself a lot of trouble trying to do number 2. I become complacent and mess up the timing. End up with hand and fork hits, rts's, and flyers.

I'm talking about sideways OTT BTW.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bob, I do find that 2. needs to be done in a precise manner and it's inconsistent, while 3. is easier, in theory at least.
 

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Jim Harris (Performance Catapults ) does the archer-style like you describe. It's funny to watch him shoot a frame without a lanyard because he often drops it after the shot because he's not holding on to the frame so much as bracing it.
I am a flipper, myself. I started doing it because looped tubes like some direction, a solid follow through with both hands. I do it all the time because it doesn't hurt anyhing and I'd rather just have one style that I use for everything, not have to think about what style to use for different slingshots.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah, they are all equal I believe, with proper practice. So there is no reason to jump from one to the other if you have one practiced a lot.
 

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Number one. I dont like flipping because of the danger of RTS shots and letting the frame drop out of my hands, even with a lanyard, would be too bothersome. I mostly shoot hammergrip, so number 3 is ruled out anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Number one. I dont like flipping because of the danger of RTS shots and letting the frame drop out of my hands, even with a lanyard, would be too bothersome. I mostly shoot hammergrip, so number 3 is ruled out anyway.
I can see number 1 working well for hammer grip. Haven't thought about it! Btw, the frame doesn't have to fall off when letting it go, I just let it pivot naturally on its waist. Still not possible with a hammer grip though.
 
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