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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm new to slingshots having got into it after my 8 year old son was interested. After getting him a Daisy and doing more research I ended up buying myself a Scorpion to shoot. I built a catch box and have been shooting a bit every day. I have a tin can hanging that I can hit from 25 feet roughly 80% of the time with any misses being very close to the can. I enjoy shooting sports and feel like I have been able to transfer skills learned from shooting guns over to slingshots to get fairly decent results in a short period of time.

After shooting hundreds if not over a thousand rounds, first with 3/8" clay ammo, then with 3/8" steel, I have never had a fork or slingshot body hit and my accuracy as mentioned above is, if nothing else, consistent from this fairly short range. So today I decided to try out the heavier .44 lead to see what kind of damage it would do to the can. I held the slingshot the exact same way as all the other times I shot it, arm fully extended, ammo pulled back to just underneath right eye, pouch held like instructed on Bill Hayes video. Everything the same that had been giving me solid results. First shot released and I see a puff of dirt literally 6 feet to the right of the catch box and probably 6 feet short. I was completely baffled. I walked around looking for the ammo and trying to think about what could have gone wrong. I finally decide to give it a second try and this time I heard a distinct sound, different than the band snap and again, the shot was way off to the right and hit short before shooting off into the yard. I'm pretty sure the ammo hit the slingshot somewhere on the way out.

At this point I am spooked so I go back to the 3/8" steel. Hit the next 6 in a row using the exact same technique. Sorry for such a long post but I wanted to provide as much info as I could. I did a search and I am seeing some threads on fork hits but not one that addresses how with this other ammo everything is fine but with the lead it is just a disaster. Any ideas? I'm sticking with steel for now.
 

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Are you shooting the lead with the same bands as the 3/8" steel? If so, that's your problem. The ammo is much too heavy for the bands. Often when ammo and bands are badly mismatched this way (too heavy of ammo) the bands will not propel the ammo fast enough for it to clear the pouch before the bands start coming back towards you.
Best case scenario: your ammo falls very short.
Worst case: the ammo comes back and hits you (known as an RTS, return to sender).
You need stronger bands for that ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you so much M.J. With all of my obsessive reading on this forum, that somehow got by me. I was indeed using the same bands as with the other ammo. It is just the stock bands that came with the Scorpion. To me they look like Theraband Gold, although I don't know that for sure. I thought that TBG was capable of shooting the heavier ammo types so perhaps it isn't. I am purchasing some bulk TBG to cut my own bands from so I'll have a better idea once that arrives. So that leaves me with a couple of follow ups.

Is it safe to assume that if I band this up for heavier ammo that the heavier bands would still shoot the 3/8" steel okay? Or should I consider getting a second slingshot exclusively for the heavier ammo?
 

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The stock Thera Gold bands by Pocket Predator are one inch wide straights cut at ten inches . They are more than adequate for 44 cal lead . You need to cut them to suit you draw length . At ten inches your not maximizing the power of the band .Unless your drawing out to fifty inches those bands need to be trimmed . Measure your draw length . Divide that number by five . Add about an inch to that number for fork and pouch attachments .

Example . 30 inch draw length .

30 divided by 5 equals 6 inches . Now add @ 1 inch . That gives you a 7 inch cut band . ( 6 inches active band length plus 1 inch for the ties . )

Now you have the power you need . Stock bands need to be tuned to the individual shooter .
 

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Here is something I have seen before. Though it may only be a slim possibility in your case. I have see guys switch to bigger ammo than they are used to and....FORK HIT!! I have seen it more than once. Mostly with a large change, like 3/8 to a 5/8 marble.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you treefork. I had seen that equation before but I didn't fully think it through with this new slingshot. You are absolutely correct. I just measured my draw and it is at 30 inches. So I am not pulling back far enough to maximize the energy transfer from the bands to the ammo. It sounds like I need to either learn to develop a longer draw closer to 45 to 50", or else get these bands cut down as you suggested. I am thinking that having more than one slingshot banded at different lengths might be helpful while I work on finding out what type of draw works best for me.

I really appreciate everyone's feedback. This has given me a lot to think about.
 

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Thank you so much M.J. With all of my obsessive reading on this forum, that somehow got by me. I was indeed using the same bands as with the other ammo. It is just the stock bands that came with the Scorpion. To me they look like Theraband Gold, although I don't know that for sure. I thought that TBG was capable of shooting the heavier ammo types so perhaps it isn't. I am purchasing some bulk TBG to cut my own bands from so I'll have a better idea once that arrives. So that leaves me with a couple of follow ups.

Is it safe to assume that if I band this up for heavier ammo that the heavier bands would still shoot the 3/8" steel okay? Or should I consider getting a second slingshot exclusively for the heavier ammo?
Try a second sling for heaver Ammo On my Power Strike slings I can adjust the wheels to adjust for different sizes of ammo it is weird how a change can make such a difference but it does that is why there are hundreds of shapes ,sizes and band and tube strengths!!WS
 

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Thank you treefork. I had seen that equation before but I didn't fully think it through with this new slingshot. You are absolutely correct. I just measured my draw and it is at 30 inches. So I am not pulling back far enough to maximize the energy transfer from the bands to the ammo. It sounds like I need to either learn to develop a longer draw closer to 45 to 50", or else get these bands cut down as you suggested. I am thinking that having more than one slingshot banded at different lengths might be helpful while I work on finding out what type of draw works best for me.

I really appreciate everyone's feedback. This has given me a lot to think about.
One more thing . Welcome to the forum !
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you all very much for the warm welcome. I have been reading tons of threads here for the last two months. The information here is invaluable and as important to me is the way in which people interact here. It is by far the most polite and pleasant forum I have ever visited. You have a very special community here and I really appreciate the amazing resource that you all have created here.
 

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I'm new to slingshots having got into it after my 8 year old son was interested. After getting him a Daisy and doing more research I ended up buying myself a Scorpion to shoot. I built a catch box and have been shooting a bit every day. I have a tin can hanging that I can hit from 25 feet roughly 80% of the time with any misses being very close to the can. I enjoy shooting sports and feel like I have been able to transfer skills learned from shooting guns over to slingshots to get fairly decent results in a short period of time.

After shooting hundreds if not over a thousand rounds, first with 3/8" clay ammo, then with 3/8" steel, I have never had a fork or slingshot body hit and my accuracy as mentioned above is, if nothing else, consistent from this fairly short range. So today I decided to try out the heavier .44 lead to see what kind of damage it would do to the can. I held the slingshot the exact same way as all the other times I shot it, arm fully extended, ammo pulled back to just underneath right eye, pouch held like instructed on Bill Hayes video. Everything the same that had been giving me solid results. First shot released and I see a puff of dirt literally 6 feet to the right of the catch box and probably 6 feet short. I was completely baffled. I walked around looking for the ammo and trying to think about what could have gone wrong. I finally decide to give it a second try and this time I heard a distinct sound, different than the band snap and again, the shot was way off to the right and hit short before shooting off into the yard. I'm pretty sure the ammo hit the slingshot somewhere on the way out.

At this point I am spooked so I go back to the 3/8" steel. Hit the next 6 in a row using the exact same technique. Sorry for such a long post but I wanted to provide as much info as I could. I did a search and I am seeing some threads on fork hits but not one that addresses how with this other ammo everything is fine but with the lead it is just a disaster. Any ideas? I'm sticking with steel for now.
Welcome to the forum!!!

I'm pretty sure treefork hit the nail on the head on this problem.

I do have a couple of questions to you on this though.

1. Non related to the issue but did you buy it in a mat finish or "Shiny" finish?

2. IF you bought the shiny finish are these hits leaving any dents in the frame?

I ask the second question because I purposely fork and frame hit a PP Universal Boyscout in the shiny finish several times as an ill advised test and all it did was leave minor scuffs that were easily buffed away with a towel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi fiveshooter. It was the matte finish and from what I can tell it didn't leave any obvious marks on the slingshot. The reason I added body to a more likely fork hit in my original post was because in addition to hearing a different sound I thought that I saw something hit the crotch of the Y on the way through. It happened so fast it is hard to say. It could have just been the bands reacting with the heavier ammo.
 

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Well i'm not a expert but i think learn with light bb ammo and only go to heavier ammo when you are ready for it.
I would just shorten the bands as treefork mentioned and stick with 3/8" steel. If you are getting fork or frame hits just be sure you are shooting outdoors and in an open area. I suspect shortening the bands appropriately will stop 99% of the hits. That said the hits don't seem to harm the PP molded models in the slightest. DO wear safety glasses. Unless you hit your hand you'll be fine. Shooting BB's from full power bands is not a recommended practice. Not recommended by me anyway. I shoot 100% indoors with 3/8" steel in this heat and I have no concerns at all as long as anyone in the house stays out of the hall while I am shooting or gives me a heads up to stop so they can walk down the hall.
 
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Well i'm not a expert but i think learn with light bb ammo and only go to heavier ammo when you are ready for it.
I would just shorten the bands as treefork mentioned and stick with 3/8" steel. If you are getting fork or frame hits just be sure you are shooting outdoors and in an open area. I suspect shortening the bands appropriately will stop 99% of the hits. That said the hits don't seem to harm the PP molded models in the slightest. DO wear safety glasses. Unless you hit your hand you'll be fine. Shooting BB's from full power bands is not a recommended practice. Not recommended by me anyway. I shoot 100% indoors with 3/8" steel in this heat and I have no concerns at all as long as anyone in the house stays out of the hall while I am shooting or gives me a heads up to stop so they can walk down the hall.
Do not do what I did yesterday bought a Triangle Bow about 3 years ago rigged it for Bowfishing had not shot it but a few times went down to the lake shot a few times and the line half hitched itself in the frame I had built to hold the reel that also acted like line holder out front of the reel that is what the string had caught on as the arrow flew past went back to the house cut a plastic cover to put over the reel and line holder so that could not happen again decided I would put in a arrow and put a full draw on it to see how the string would lay on the cover at full draw looked OK as I was releasing my draw about half way down fingers slipped off the string the string finger cover rotated my fingers from the string there was a round glass case full of trinkets well it shot through both sides and into the heater on the other side of the case, glass went everywhere!! No more drawing a bow in the house so be careful when shooting indoors!!WS
 

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Well i'm not a expert but i think learn with light bb ammo and only go to heavier ammo when you are ready for it.
I would just shorten the bands as treefork mentioned and stick with 3/8" steel. If you are getting fork or frame hits just be sure you are shooting outdoors and in an open area. I suspect shortening the bands appropriately will stop 99% of the hits. That said the hits don't seem to harm the PP molded models in the slightest. DO wear safety glasses. Unless you hit your hand you'll be fine. Shooting BB's from full power bands is not a recommended practice. Not recommended by me anyway. I shoot 100% indoors with 3/8" steel in this heat and I have no concerns at all as long as anyone in the house stays out of the hall while I am shooting or gives me a heads up to stop so they can walk down the hall.
Do not do what I did yesterday bought a Triangle Bow about 3 years ago rigged it for Bowfishing had not shot it but a few times went down to the lake shot a few times and the line half hitched itself in the frame I had built to hold the reel that also acted like line holder out front of the reel that is what the string had caught on as the arrow flew past went back to the house cut a plastic cover to put over the reel and line holder so that could not happen again decided I would put in a arrow and put a full draw on it to see how the string would lay on the cover at full draw looked OK as I was releasing my draw about half way down fingers slipped off the string the string finger cover rotated my fingers from the string there was a round glass case full of trinkets well it shot through both sides and into the heater on the other side of the case, glass went everywhere!! No more drawing a bow in the house so be careful when shooting indoors!!WS
Wow, sorry man. That would make anyone scared to pull a bow indoors. I know sometimes freak things can happen. Just be thankful nobody was hurt. EVERYTHING else is replaceable.
 
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