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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of you that actually aim and use some part of your slingshot as a "sight", what do you do when you move beyond 10 meters? How do you decide how much hold-over to use to compensate for an unknown change in distance? If you are dialed into a set distance because of target shooting how do you move beyond it?
 

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Missing Barns and Telling Yarns
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I rarely shoot beyond 10 meters, but when I do I treat it just like I would with archery. I shoot gangster, and overlay the top and bottom band over one another. I sight with the tip of the fork, and depending on the frame it shoots at POA or just above it at 10 meters. When I move back, I try to do it in increments of 5 meters, and adjust accordingly. For the frames which shoot above POA, I just bring the fork tip closer up to the target. In terms of hunting, I'm assuming you eyeball the distance to your quarry, and utilize one of your 5 meter aiming points as a reference for shooting. So I suppose I never move beyond a set distance, you just practice at multiple ones and then use those to inform your aiming point when shooting an unknown distance.
 

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You lower your anchor point to compensate for drop....and after a lot of practice your instincts will kick in....and it becomes second nature....
Your aim reference point should always remain the same....
Hope this helps

Len

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For me it's much like sighting in iron sights on a rifle....your front sight doesn't move...you adjust the rear elevation sight blade....further away shots require you to raise the rear blade sight which angles the barrel higher and lowers the rear of gun in reference to your eye....which is same as anchor point with slingshot.

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Aimstinctivist
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I am an Aimstinctivist. I seek forever the Zone.

I aim now with my soul, until it's felt in the bone.

edit: The same way I aim when I throw something at a target Doc- if I stay out of the way, my brain will make the necessary adjustments in launch angle and transmit those to my hands- all by itself. I'm much more accurate as a spectator to that event, rather than trying to influence it one way or another.
 

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Good question I shot at a baking sheet pan several yards away at the MWST, and was lucky enough to hit it once or twice, how I did it, I can’t tell you, because I just looked at the pan pulled my slingshot up and let it fly Glad to see you back on the Forum.
 

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Missing Barns and Telling Yarns
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Mikmaq Warrior - I'm curious. Do you have set anchor points for different distances? IE - cheek for 10 yards, jaw for 15. collar bone for 20? Or do you just "feel" where you need to anchor?
 
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Mikmaq Warrior - I'm curious. Do you have set anchor points for different distances? IE - cheek for 10 yards, jaw for 15. collar bone for 20? Or do you just "feel" where you need to anchor?
Ive never really given it much thought tbh....

i have a set anchor at 12 yards.... its just miniscule adjustments out to about 15 yards....really miniscule actually....a bit more at 20 yard range ...past 20 it becomes instinctive really....I mean if I am target shooting at 20 yards then I find my anchor for that distance, but when you are hunting, you don't really have the luxury of measuring exact distance...ya kinda have to let your instincts take over...

I warm up before every hunt....I have a plastic practice golfball target set up and I start at about 10 yards and just walk back and take shots as I move bac....and then I walk back towards the target and take shots...
Sometimes I set up a 1/2" target and when I hit it 3 times in a row @10-12 yards them I'm ready to go...
Early on I use to focus on distance...at this point it's not as important cause my brain seems to calculate and adjust automatically...

If I were to give any advice to someone wanting to hunt using sighting method, it would be to keep your range within 12 yards anyway....so you won't have to worry about anchor points so much....I really try to get as close as I can...

I hope that helps....

Len

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Mikmaq Warrior - I'm curious. Do you have set anchor points for different distances? IE - cheek for 10 yards, jaw for 15. collar bone for 20? Or do you just "feel" where you need to anchor?
Long story short...I have a set anchor and then it's all about feel and instinct....sorry about getting carried away...your question is a great one that made me really think...lol

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
What I am suspecting is that most of us do a bit of instinctive shooting.

When I shoot a rifle there is little or no instinctive shooting going on. Experience, along with some knowledge of the trajectory helps me to put the bullet where I want it. With a slingshot any change in distance has to be either estimated, guessed at or "felt". What I'm wondering is if that feeling is in fact one of the components of instinctive shooting. When I shoot I pay no attention to the bands at all. If I wanted to I could sight along them because they are in and just below my line of sight but it hasn't been necessary for a long time.

I'm just wondering if some who aim might in fact be bumping up against instinctive shooting.
 

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What I am suspecting is that most of us do a bit of instinctive shooting.

When I shoot a rifle there is little or no instinctive shooting going on. Experience, along with some knowledge of the trajectory helps me to put the bullet where I want it. With a slingshot any change in distance has to be either estimated, guessed at or "felt". What I'm wondering is if that feeling is in fact one of the components of instinctive shooting. When I shoot I pay no attention to the bands at all. If I wanted to I could sight along them because they are in and just below my line of sight but it hasn't been necessary for a long time.

I'm just wondering if some who aim might in fact be bumping up against instinctive shooting.
I agree....I used to sight down my bands with my non-dominant eye shut.....I relied on making sure to have the bands exactly aligned under my eye and in a perfect line through fork tip to target....then one day I decided to keep both eyes open...now I don't need to sight down the bands...I look kinda at the fork tip and target at same time (can't really explain it) and my bands are actually out of focus....so it's kinda like instinctive....my shots get off faster to...active release....sighting/instinctive hybrid kinda

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I have 10 yard 25 yard and 50 yard catch barrels and cardboard pizza boxes between them [on good days] that I move around on,5 shots at each,also a trip to the river and a soda can floating downstream help with aim,but a lot of it is both eyes open semi instinctive adjustments,alot like Mokmaqwarriors style
 

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I have 10 yard 25 yard and 50 yard catch barrels and cardboard pizza boxes between them [on good days] that I move around on,5 shots at each,also a trip to the river and a soda can floating downstream help with aim,but a lot of it is both eyes open semi instinctive adjustments,alot like Mokmaqwarriors style
I Mikmaq sorry,fat fingers moving to fast,lol
 

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I shot "instinctive" for 20 years and did fine out to 20 yards but some days my instincts just didn't work so well. In 2011 I decided to try conscious aiming and it was a big struggle. I gave up many times and went back to the familiar "instinctive" method like I used for trad archery. Finally, after many attempts, I managed to figure out the conscious aiming with a slingshot. I'm now able to enjoy long distance target shooting at distances that were beyond my subconscious instinctive aiming. Last summer I was making conscious aiming hits at 30, 40, 50 and 75 yards. I always looked forward to these shooting sessions.

I use a narrow fork width (3" to 3 1/4") that allows aiming by using the upper fork corner (gangsta style) and an anchor on my ear. I use an ear walking technique for known distances that I measure out. A 10 yard shot would be an anchor just above the tragus. A 20 yard shot might be on the tragus. A 30 yard the notch at the bottom of the tragus. A 40 yard might be the lobe and 50 the bottom of the lobe. You have to calibrate for your ammo speed. For 75 yards I was shooting 265fps and using the bottom of the lobe. Lots of fun!

If I was a hunter I would still use the ear walking method but limit my shots to 20 yards. After a while you can estimate close distances. Your ear is very sensitive and it's easy to feel your anchor. I use my thumb knuckle on the ear.
 

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I have 10 yard 25 yard and 50 yard catch barrels and cardboard pizza boxes between them [on good days] that I move around on,5 shots at each,also a trip to the river and a soda can floating downstream help with aim,but a lot of it is both eyes open semi instinctive adjustments,alot like Mokmaqwarriors style
I Mikmaq sorry,fat fingers moving to fast,lol
Lol... :

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I shot "instinctive" for 20 years and did fine out to 20 yards but some days my instincts just didn't work so well. In 2011 I decided to try conscious aiming and it was a big struggle. I gave up many times and went back to the familiar "instinctive" method like I used for trad archery. Finally, after many attempts, I managed to figure out the conscious aiming with a slingshot. I'm now able to enjoy long distance target shooting at distances that were beyond my subconscious instinctive aiming. Last summer I was making conscious aiming hits at 30, 40, 50 and 75 yards. I always looked forward to these shooting sessions.

I use a narrow fork width (3" to 3 1/4") that allows aiming by using the upper fork corner (gangsta style) and an anchor on my ear. I use an ear walking technique for known distances that I measure out. A 10 yard shot would be an anchor just above the tragus. A 20 yard shot might be on the tragus. A 30 yard the notch at the bottom of the tragus. A 40 yard might be the lobe and 50 the bottom of the lobe. You have to calibrate for your ammo speed. For 75 yards I was shooting 265fps and using the bottom of the lobe. Lots of fun!

If I was a hunter I would still use the ear walking method but limit my shots to 20 yards. After a while you can estimate close distances. Your ear is very sensitive and it's easy to feel your anchor. I use my thumb knuckle on the ear.
I shoot 3/4 butterfly....my band only slightly touches my cheek...but I love the idea and how practical using the point on your ear would be for anchoring...It would definitely be something I'd use if I still used short draw.
I had to switch to butterfly because of injury...even had to change grip style...

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I shot "instinctive" for 20 years and did fine out to 20 yards but some days my instincts just didn't work so well. In 2011 I decided to try conscious aiming and it was a big struggle. I gave up many times and went back to the familiar "instinctive" method like I used for trad archery. Finally, after many attempts, I managed to figure out the conscious aiming with a slingshot. I'm now able to enjoy long distance target shooting at distances that were beyond my subconscious instinctive aiming. Last summer I was making conscious aiming hits at 30, 40, 50 and 75 yards. I always looked forward to these shooting sessions.

I use a narrow fork width (3" to 3 1/4") that allows aiming by using the upper fork corner (gangsta style) and an anchor on my ear. I use an ear walking technique for known distances that I measure out. A 10 yard shot would be an anchor just above the tragus. A 20 yard shot might be on the tragus. A 30 yard the notch at the bottom of the tragus. A 40 yard might be the lobe and 50 the bottom of the lobe. You have to calibrate for your ammo speed. For 75 yards I was shooting 265fps and using the bottom of the lobe. Lots of fun!

If I was a hunter I would still use the ear walking method but limit my shots to 20 yards. After a while you can estimate close distances. Your ear is very sensitive and it's easy to feel your anchor. I use my thumb knuckle on the ear.
I shoot 3/4 butterfly....my band only slightly touches my cheek...but I love the idea and how practical using the point on your ear would be for anchoring...It would definitely be something I'd use if I still used short draw.
I had to switch to butterfly because of injury...even had to change grip style...

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I'm hoping to eventually figure out the 3/4 butterfly. I spent some time trying it last summer but had some issues. Something to experiment with again when I can get outdoors where it's safer to make accuracy errors.
 

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A steady visual reference point at the fork tip used for aiming is essential in my opinion, assuming that a consistent anchor point is being used to ensure the same draw weight for every shot.

Although I rarely shoot beyond 10 meters, and that the flight trajectory (POI) becomes somewhat curved beyond that point, aiming above the intended target via the middle or the bottom of the fork tip works well up to 15-20 meters. The guesswork factor increases beyond that point, particularly if a "floating" anchor point (semi or full butterfly style) is being used.

Unlike archery, we do not have the wonderful option of aiming pins, albeit that many Chinese slingshots have fiber optic pins at the fork tips for various distances (great if your eyesight is 20/20, maybe not otherwise).

Lighter ammo will of course have a flatter trajectory, and helps to minimize errors at greater distances.
 
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