Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's either Sycamore or Norway Maple. It started a bit like the fork in the 1st photo - thick and clunky.

The 2nd and 3rd photos show how it is now, sanded to 240 grit and ready to have band grooves cut.

Cosmetically the exposed epoxy glue is not ideal, but achieving a closer fit of the "wings" eluded me. 6/10, must try harder. :(

The fork gap is 65 mm, not exactly a PFS.

I am thinking of trying flatbands, using the Precise 3rd Generation 0.70 mm rubber that I bought recently from Nick Hegarty here in the UK. Not too much of it, just enough for light to medium ammo, from 2 to 6 grammes.

Any suggestions, please, on the flatband dimensions? Effective rubber length will be 5.75", giving me 4x stretch factor when drawing to my cheekbone.

OTT or TTF style, not sure yet, may try both, starting with OTT.

Mike
 

Attachments

·
Missing Barns and Telling Yarns
Joined
·
955 Posts
That's freaking gorgeous! I love that shape with the wings. So you epoxied the wings on? Did you use excess wood from the fork, or another type? I've never seen anything like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's freaking gorgeous! I love that shape with the wings. So you epoxied the wings on? Did you use excess wood from the fork, or another type? I've never seen anything like it.
Thanks - I had another fork where I had stupidly cut it with the fork legs too short, so I cut that one up, I am not sure that it is the same wood.

It's a boatbuilding epoxy system, MAS Blue Dolphin, 2 liquids and a filler powder mixed up to make a structural filler. I primed both sides of the joints with the mixed liquid before adding the filler powder and using the gap-filling sloppy paste.

The pics show how I used an 18 mm spade bit in a drill press to drill the holes, glued the segments on and then rough-shaped them with my old hand fretsaw.

Then I shaped them mainly with 120-grit sandpaper glued to various dowel diameters. Then 180-grit and 240-grit.

It all took a long time, but I had been wanting to do something a bit different and more challenging. I did not risk using power tools, except for the drilling.

The dimensions in mm are:

Height 164

Width 93

Fork gap 65

Fork depth 54

Width of pinch grip 55

I wanted space, I could call her "Space Oddity", but I think I'll call her "Wings".

Mike
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,162 Posts
That's a beauty! My guess would be maple. I don't think it's Sycamore. Do you have any pics of it when it still had its bark on? Love that wing idea!
Thanks, I think it is the second from the left in this photo. It's not obvious, but I took a lot of wood off.
That's definitely a mulberry fork. Hats off to you for working up that beauty without it cracking. I've never been able to do that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That's a beauty! My guess would be maple. I don't think it's Sycamore. Do you have any pics of it when it still had its bark on? Love that wing idea!
Thanks, I think it is the second from the left in this photo. It's not obvious, but I took a lot of wood off.
That's definitely a mulberry fork. Hats off to you for working up that beauty without it cracking. I've never been able to do that.
Thank you, I cannot really question your identification as Mulberry, but I had no indications of cracking when I was working on it.

At the critical fork crutch area, I did not remove much wood, so I hope that it will not crack there in use, but who knows?

In case the fork structure might crack, I'll shoot it carefully to start with, down away from my head. Maybe pull to 5x stretch initially, then drop back to my usual 4x.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,162 Posts
That's a beauty! My guess would be maple. I don't think it's Sycamore. Do you have any pics of it when it still had its bark on? Love that wing idea!
Thanks, I think it is the second from the left in this photo. It's not obvious, but I took a lot of wood off.
That's definitely a mulberry fork. Hats off to you for working up that beauty without it cracking. I've never been able to do that.
Thank you, I cannot really question your identification as Mulberry, but I had no indications of cracking when I was working on it.

At the critical fork crutch area, I did not remove much wood, so I hope that it will not crack there in use, but who knows?

In case the fork structure might crack, I'll shoot it carefully to start with, down away from my head. Maybe pull to 5x stretch initially, then drop back to my usual 4x.

Mike
I'd say if it hasn't cracked by now, then you're in good shape. Mine cracked in the drying process. Even if a crack opens up, mulberry is incredibly strong. I wouldn't worry too much about it. Enjoy that beauty my friend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That's a beauty! My guess would be maple. I don't think it's Sycamore. Do you have any pics of it when it still had its bark on? Love that wing idea!
Thanks, I think it is the second from the left in this photo. It's not obvious, but I took a lot of wood off.
That's definitely a mulberry fork. Hats off to you for working up that beauty without it cracking. I've never been able to do that.
Thank you, I cannot really question your identification as Mulberry, but I had no indications of cracking when I was working on it.

At the critical fork crutch area, I did not remove much wood, so I hope that it will not crack there in use, but who knows?

In case the fork structure might crack, I'll shoot it carefully to start with, down away from my head. Maybe pull to 5x stretch initially, then drop back to my usual 4x.

Mike
I'd say if it hasn't cracked by now, then you're in good shape. Mine cracked in the drying process. Even if a crack opens up, mulberry is incredibly strong. I wouldn't worry too much about it. Enjoy that beauty my friend.
That's a beauty! My guess would be maple. I don't think it's Sycamore. Do you have any pics of it when it still had its bark on? Love that wing idea!
Thanks, I think it is the second from the left in this photo. It's not obvious, but I took a lot of wood off.
That's definitely a mulberry fork. Hats off to you for working up that beauty without it cracking. I've never been able to do that.
Thank you, I cannot really question your identification as Mulberry, but I had no indications of cracking when I was working on it.

At the critical fork crutch area, I did not remove much wood, so I hope that it will not crack there in use, but who knows?

In case the fork structure might crack, I'll shoot it carefully to start with, down away from my head. Maybe pull to 5x stretch initially, then drop back to my usual 4x.

Mike
I'd say if it hasn't cracked by now, then you're in good shape. Mine cracked in the drying process. Even if a crack opens up, mulberry is incredibly strong. I wouldn't worry too much about it. Enjoy that beauty my friend.
Thanks, it feels very strong.

To suit the slender posts (this is Strictly Come Dancing, not Slingshots) I am thinking of double Precise 3rd Generation 0.7 mm, tapered 11 mm to 9 mm, or thereabouts. Mainly for 5-gramme clay balls or steel balls of similar weight. I did something similar recently with Theraband Gold, on a broadly similar fork for a friend.

This should also lob my 26 mm ice balls without worries about fork hits.

What type and size of rubber would you favour?

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
At this stage in the game it's not very often I see something I haven't seen before. Very cool. Well done.
Thanks Winnie, that's praise indeed.

Seeing these last 2 replies prompted me to write a new post on the finished slingshot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,864 Posts
Love the shape....thorny devil

Sent from my B3-A40 using Tapatalk

Thanks, I think I'll call it "Wings".
Mike
Great name!
It just reminded me of the thorns i push through during snowshoe hare hunts....me and my friends refer to them as tborny devils...lol...

MW

Sent from my LG-M470 using Tapatalk
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top