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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve had a few days to shoot my slingshots, without any interruptions???? I grabbed a tuber slingshot and decided to give it some serious time. I’ve been shooting 1 inch targets on paper and finally looked at a couple of them and thought I can do this???????? I now have to work on my mental part of shooting????????????????‍♂???? I don’t have a serious competitive mindset, so Maybe I need breathing exercises. I am fully aware that I have to shoot in front of people to get over stage fright, but what I am referring to is my confidence in my shooting ability. Any and all suggestions will be appreciated
 

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I struggle with the target Tag. Got a busy mind and keeping the internal noise down while I focus on the task in hand in front of a target is the entire challenge for me. When I'm freewheeling and plinking off shots all over the shop - I find my accuracy, sometimes great accuracy, but when I settle down for a target session and have to think about form......it's hard work.

I'm sure one feeds the other, so I do stick to the target shooting, though in my heart I'm a plinker. My process is stance, stare at the bull, draw breath as I raise and aim, exhale as I lower, fire when the target appears. Got a tendency to hover and wonder about the shopping though. It's a bit of a battle....

:)
 

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I inhale as I draw looking at where I intent to hit and exhale onto the target, very brief settling period and release. Most importantly for me is I forget the shot as soon as it hits the target. Every shot is a new cycle and my first shot. That way I can be positive, which is important because if I think I might miss then I probably will.

Almost forgot, I put the number of balls I intend to fire in a small bowl or usually wear a magnetic ring with them attached. If I count the shots as I go along it seems to increase the pressure. Sometimes I only realise I shot the intended amount when there's none left.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your replies It’s like trying to lose weight I guess, there is no magic pill. I’m definitely a plinker I have no desire to shoot better than anyone. I’m working on instinctive shooting with my PFS (tag) model from Bill Hays. I wasn’t sure about instinctive shooting, ut it’s really fun.
 

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You could do like actors, find one friendly face in the crowd and shoot for them. Don't think it would work if you pictured the audience buck naked. I don't like competition either, but when forced into it, I really hate losing. Confidence is everything, just keep shooting until you know in your mind that you are going to shoot well.
 

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The slingshot World Cup in Italy was the first tournament I had ever attended, albeit that I was far from being serious competition material at the time: I had focused more on making slingshots than actually shooting them with top precision in mind. Let's say it quite bluntly: I was a lousy shot, with dozens of shooters and visitors doubtlessly having a good laugh in the background.

Indeed, casual plinking in the backyard and competitive slingshot shooting are worlds apart. :hmm:

I found that the only way to survive the competitive part at the tournament was to be in a mindset as though I was alone shooting at the targets, and thus simply forgetting whoever was watching my rather shoddy performance. Besides that "ordeal", it was awesome meeting other competitors and discussing multiple slingshot-related issues - not to mention watching those destined for the top prize hit the targets consistently one after the other.

Ultimately, it's really about taking part in the show, and doing one's best. Also bear in mind that there will always be worse performers than yourself at such events. It's when you see what can be achieved that will boost your motivation to do better - and you will for sure if you work at it. Feeling right and a bit of luck also make a difference on the grand day of the tournament.

Since this (historical) event, I've been practicing almost every day, and have improved my shot group at 10 yards (competitive distance) considerably: a 5 cm (2 inches) spread is now my norm, and very occasionally 3 cm. I hold my breath while aiming and releasing the shot to maximize stability (something I learned with handgun shooting). Moreover, if you're not focused in your mind, that group will open up rapidly: it's a case of being "Zen", I guess ;).

Least but not last, I train holding 3 kg weights in place with both arms extended. This improves endurance and steadiness while aiming considerably.
 
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