Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,396 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello to all,

A new small slingshot with a fairly narrow fork gap (4 cm, or 1.57 inches) requires careful pouch alignment and a good release technique to avoid fork hits: well, I messed up with a few initial pouch releases, and paid the price: a dented left-hand-side metal fork tip.

After the unavoidable oh ç%?)&+??? moment, this also made me realize that the Dankung "rosewood Toucan" really is made of 304 stainless steel, as they say. This is reassuring. If that had been zinc alloy, there would be huge chunks missing, as zinc alloy is quite brittle, and would certainly not resist the hard impact of an 8 mm steel ball bearing zipping along at well over 200 fps plus.

The good news is that the section I managed to hit is part of the flat band compression clamp system (I'll assume that is the right way to describe this unit), basically a metal cover with a hole for the compression screw and notches to hold the bands in place. I have contacted Dankung to see whether it can be replaced at a reasonable cost (it still works, but we slingshot shooters like a pristine look, right?). In the worst case, some 320 grit sandpaper will do some cosmetic work, no problem.

If you're worried about making a similar mistake, you might consider placing a small thin piece of PVC or aluminum over the exposed fork areas with the help of a small rubber band....just in case. "&%)?%+ happens...hmm.

Anyway, at the risk of being labelled a lousy shot, I though I'd share the photograph of my wonderful fork hit experience: no fingers harmed in this one...phew!

I have meanwhile found the right technique, and am shooting nice groups at 10 yards. No more fork hits. It's all about learning, right?

Pebble Shooter
 

Attachments

·
Mojave Mo
Joined
·
5,166 Posts
Right!
Hello to all,

A new small slingshot with a fairly narrow fork gap (4 cm, or 1.57 inches) requires careful pouch alignment and a good release technique to avoid fork hits: well, I messed up with a few initial pouch releases, and paid the price: a dented left-hand-side metal fork tip.

After the unavoidable oh ç%?)&+??? moment, this also made me realize that the Dankung "rosewood Toucan" really is made of 304 stainless steel, as they say. This is reassuring. If that had been zinc alloy, there would be huge chunks missing, as zinc alloy is quite brittle, and would certainly not resist the hard impact of an 8 mm steel ball bearing zipping along at well over 200 fps plus.

The good news is that the section I managed to hit is part of the flat band compression clamp system (I'll assume that is the right way to describe this unit), basically a metal cover with a hole for the compression screw and notches to hold the bands in place. I have contacted Dankung to see whether it can be replaced at a reasonable cost (it still works, but we slingshot shooters like a pristine look, right?). In the worst case, some 320 grit sandpaper will do some cosmetic work, no problem.

If you're worried about making a similar mistake, you might consider placing a small thin piece of PVC or aluminum over the exposed fork areas with the help of a small rubber band....just in case. "&%)?%+ happens...hmm.

Anyway, at the risk of being labelled a lousy shot, I though I'd share the photograph of my wonderful fork hit experience: no fingers harmed in this one...phew!

I have meanwhile found the right technique, and am shooting nice groups at 10 yards. No more fork hits. It's all about learning, right?

Pebble Shooter
Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,271 Posts
Getting a few forkhits is probably expected on the learning curve? My first one is a scout with a couple of dents but nothing critical... For me I always wear any dents or scratches on my tools/equipment/watches with a sense that I created those scars, it's all mine and it tells my personal story of owning it. It personalises the item for me. Each mark triggers memories of the moment it happened and that strangely makes me even more attached to the it... dunno if that makes sense? Maybe the only thing that I do need to be pristine is my car...

I don't know whose but someone once shared a pic of a really beaten up aluminium PPMG some time back that made me realise my forkhits wasn't so bad afterall. That thing looked like swiss cheese!

I find forkhits most likely to happen at moments of a lapse in concentration or when rushing a shot (moving live target) or when shooting something at a trajectory I am not used to. It's probably an unintentional tweak or a "speedbump" effect at release that sends the ammo into the frame. Oh well... it happens.

That's a really good macro shot of your slingshot btw! Thanks for sharing how it looks like after a hit cos I've wondered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
612 Posts
A heads-up post is always nice, so thanks. In a previous discussion it was mentioned how the Dankung listing for this slingshot seems a but overpriced (~$35 iirc) compared to other listings, like on AliExpress. The good news is that if you buy from Dankung you can be assured that it's a quality piece, and also that if something were to go wrong with a product, they would have your back 100%.
 

·
aka CYBORG
Joined
·
2,060 Posts
Fork hits can be heartbreaking, depressing even. Thankfully I've had very few, but I take care of my stuff and seeing the damage makes me wince. I've found a way to lighten up and live with it - I remember all of the scars and marks I've accumulated in my long life and then a small mark on a frame doesn't seem so important.

Paraphrasing a recent 'Here We Go' post - 'Maybe life is about collecting the scars to prove we showed up for it'.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top