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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you use a dremel for sanding boardcuts, g10, or whatever softer material you use, check out dremel's high speed cutting bits. http://www.dremel.com/en-us/AttachmentsAndAccessories/Pages/CategoryProducts.aspx?catid=70&catname=High+Speed+Cutters I recently purchased the 115 model and it cut my time for doing one side of a slingshot from about 45 min/1 hr to literally 15/20 min! And its metal, so it will be a while before you need a new one. Look at a local lowe's, home depot, sears, crafts store, hardware store, or any place that sells dremels.


HOWEVER: low speeds and being extremely careful will benefit you very much. If the bit slips over an edge, it can easily ruin the outside veneers of multiplex, penetrating about 1/16" or 1.59 mm into the wood. so be very careful, let the dremel do the work, and hold the tool with maximum control in mind. Point the shaving away from your face. Normally a sanding drum gives off sawdust, but this bit actually gives off small shavings that can hurt you, and YOUR EYES. My advice is to wear clear safety glasses and a mask (or respirator if you wanna over-do-it). Remember to be careful with this bit, and work with it as though it were out of control.

But of course, it only does the mule work, bring in a sanding drum for finer details, files for even finer details, and sandpaper for finishing.

Good luck,
kyle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
lol, i figured that somone had found it before me, i wanted to just inform people of them, and that theyre awesome!.
 

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I've got a full set. I've used them with a dremel, a pendulum drill and a high speed air drill and have never had much success with them for anything but engraving and jigging. What's the secret?
 

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They are not cheap, but they do make different models to choose from with different prices. I use them so much I have six of them. They will work well on any material I can think of that a person would normally work with. I have cut tile, wood, plastic and metal. You can etch glass with diamond bits too. I like using carbide bits for carving, they work great and last a very long time. You can get so many different shapes and sizes of bits and not just from Dremel. You can put on buffing wheels and using jewelers rouge, polish many materials. Grinding bits, cut-off wheels...the list goes on and on. They are like a mini machine shop.
You can buy cheap knock off brands from places like Harbor Freight. They would probably be just as good, but I don't know.
 

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i have just graduated as metal worker but never used such stuff almost learned nothing at school wich sucked i know what a dremel can do but not wich materials is it like drills different drills for wood metal etc or is it 1 piece for all ?
 

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All different kinds of bits for different materials.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've got a full set. I've used them with a dremel, a pendulum drill and a high speed air drill and have never had much success with them for anything but engraving and jigging. What's the secret?
Well when detailing i suggest a dremel over a pendulum or air drill, mainly because i don't know what a pendulum drill is and an air drill is a drill, not intended for constant use such as a dremel is. But as for advice? well i have a knock-off dremel with a rotary "0-7" speed control. I set it at about three and as i said, go slow and take your time, and as with a sanding drum, it only works in one direction. Give it another go and tell me how it went. Good luck.

And as smitty stated, dremels are tiny machine shops. It is a simple dc motor, on off switch, mayby a speed switch, and a chuck that can be changed to fit any bit. Dremel makes everything from buffing and cleaning supplies, to sanding discs, to cut off weels, to metal grinding stones, to a workstation that transforms the hand tool into a small bench router. They are AWESOME!!! Though, they are intended for smaller jobs, so they are great for hobbies. I use a knock off brand from harbor freight (a knock off tool heaven), but if you search "rotary tool" on ebay, you will get thousands of results. As i said, its a fairly simple circuit, so its hard to buy a crappy one. But if you go Dremel brand, go with the 4000, its awesome! oh, and NO BATTERY ONES, they are really annoying.


good luck.

kyle.
 

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Sorry I have to disagree I have a micro die grinder that is a air drill runs twice the speed of a dermal and as easy to use as a ink pen I also have the dermal stylus witch is very handy because I can work any were then I have a micro motor drill bout 1/4 size of a dermal influent speed plus reversible and a micro sand blaster the size as a pen. I find all these tools as as something I cant do without. If you search on E-BAY they can all be found very cheap at times.
 

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i have just graduated as metal worker but never used such stuff almost learned nothing at school wich sucked i know what a dremel can do but not wich materials is it like drills different drills for wood metal etc or is it 1 piece for all ?
You probably learned about stuff like welding aluminium with A/C TIG-argon, cutting speeds, sintering and heat treatment, all of which are vastly more interesting, more useful and harder to pick up than wielding a dremel. I should go back to school, but all vocational training here is in Cantonese.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, ive never heard of a micro die grinder until today. I might have to go to harbor freight and pick one up, see how i like it. most seem to have 1/8" collets too, same as my dremel!
 

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I've been using Dremels forever it seems, 30+ years at least. I can't remember a time when my shop(s) didn't have one. I have gone through only three of them in my lifetime. If you respect them they can last a LONG time.

That being said, I have hundreds of different bits for them, and will have to admit that this heavy cut series of bits gets used the most. I have the barrel (the 115 i guess), the tapered one, a flat one (more like a circular saw blade), ball, round end, on and on.

I also have the finer toothed ones in many more shapes as well.

One of the best investments I ever made for the Dremel was the Flex Shaft!

FYI, go get the $10 rotary tool set from Harbor Freight....The cutoff disks alone are worth that measly sum. Give the cheapass tool itself away, but keep the bits. :)
 

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It does have multiple sanding 'drums'. Mine are from about 3\8 inch to about 3\4 inch. The burrs range in size from about 1\32 to about a half inch.

I hope I'm making sense. If not I can post pics....Or so I think I can.
 
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