Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Missing Barns and Telling Yarns
Joined
·
985 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So winter has already arrive here in KY, and it looks like my chances at shooting are dropping dramatically. I'm trying to figure out a way to shoot indoors, but my wife is certain I'll break something or shoot the dog. Does anyone shoot indoors, and if so what kind of set up are you using? What kind of ammo? I was thinking of using some low-power bands and some low velocity ammo, like airsoft pellets. I live in an apartment, so space is at a minimum. Any advice is appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,396 Posts
The ammo size is probably not the decisive factor, as even a small .177 steel BB or airsoft ammo can do fairly serious damage if it hits unintended targets :hmm: . 6 to 8 mm steel ammo should be quite safe for indoor shooting too, anything larger maybe not be. It really depends on what areas of your apartment are "suitable" for this purpose to minimize potential accidents. Remember that good old saying "*ç%&? happens"....indeed.

A good option is to drape thick old bath towels (2 are usually sufficient) loosely over trestles, or maybe over a telescopic door bar (check for a safe background), and placing some cardboard with marked targets against the towels with the help of sticky tape or string: the steel ammo will perforate the cardboard, with the towels retaining the ammo energy without potentially dangerous rebounds. This is what I've been doing both inside and outdoors without problems - not to mention reusable ammo.

The towels will of course eventually have holes in certain sections from repeated impacts, which is why a second towel in good condition behind the first towel is a good idea to avoid that unwanted "oops..." moment. Placing a solid piece of wood behind the trestles with the draped towels might be an idea, just in case. Old linen sheets or curtains could also be considered as viable alternatives to to bath towels.

If impact noise is a problem with regard to neighbors, hanging a piece of string with a knot at the end of it on the towels makes for a challenging target: just make sure that the towels are hung very loosely in that case to reduce ammo rebounds to an absolute minimum. This should enable you to shoot fairly safely in your apartment.

Least but not last, choose a shooting distance that corresponds to your skill level...

Just my 2 cents worth...
 

Attachments

·
Missing Barns and Telling Yarns
Joined
·
985 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The ammo size is probably not the decisive factor, as even a small .177 steel BB or airsoft ammo can do fairly serious damage if it hits unintended targets :hmm: . 6 to 8 mm steel ammo should be quite safe for indoor shooting too, anything larger maybe not be. It really depends on what areas of your apartment are "suitable" for this purpose to minimize potential accidents. Remember that good old saying "*ç%&? happens"....indeed.

A good option is to drape thick old bath towels (2 are usually sufficient) loosely over trestles, or maybe over a telescopic door bar (check for a safe background), and placing some cardboard with marked targets against the towels with the help of sticky tape or string: the steel ammo will perforate the cardboard, with the towels retaining the ammo energy without potentially dangerous rebounds. This is what I've been doing both inside and outdoors without problems - not to mention reusable ammo.

The towels will of course eventually have holes in certain sections from repeated impacts, which is why a second towel in good condition behind the first towel is a good idea to avoid that unwanted "oops..." moment. Placing a solid piece of wood behind the trestles with the draped towels might be an idea, just in case. Old linen sheets or curtains could also be considered as viable alternatives to to bath towels.

If impact noise is a problem with regard to neighbors, hanging a piece of string with a knot at the end of it on the towels makes for a challenging target: just make sure that the towels are hung very loosely in that case to reduce ammo rebounds to an absolute minimum. This should enable you to shoot fairly safely in your apartment.

Least but not last, choose a shooting distance that corresponds to your skill level...

Just my 2 cents worth...
I agree with PB, at least worth a quarter! Thanks for the tips. I hadn't thought or the larger comforter or towel. That large backdrop would be perfect if I missed my current setup (small catchbox).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
I've got a 10 yard stretch through several rooms and into a catch box. Usually with 5/8" marbles. Best utilized when no one else is around. Mishaps are likely, see my signature. I can only get the light weight "safe" ammo to fly accurately out to about 5 yards. The dog used to be real curious and kept getting in the way until the first time he watched me drop a squirrel with a slingshot. Now he usually hides if I take more than a few shots inside, and starts scanning the tree tops as soon as I take a slingshot outside. :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,288 Posts
Is it you, Tag?
I usually wait til everyone is out at school and/or work... then I put the dogs in their "place"... a command for them to go to their crates.

I shoot 33' down my hall into a catch frame much like Pebbleshooter's.
 

Attachments

·
Missing Barns and Telling Yarns
Joined
·
985 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
This is my setup. Its just a couple pieces of wood cut to a length that wedges between the walls of the hallway, with sheets hung over them.

Its waaaay bigger than it needs to be but it does make sure I won't have ammo bouncing around the house or destroying the cupboards behind. I also want my partner to start shooting and this should give her the confidence to give it a go.

The smaller and lighter, within reason, the material used for the initial catch, the less bounce out you will have. If its nice and light it will drop the ammo straight down, if its a heavy material it will catapult the ammo back out. Credit to the guy who suggested pillow cases as a catch.

I have a second layer of catch material because the first layer ends up getting small holes in it that you shoot through sometimes. You want the second layer at least 1.5 inches behind the first so it doesn't affect how it drops the ammo.

When I get around to building my out door catch box, I'll be copying this setup exactly. It works perfectly and even supermarket quality sheets and pillow cases last for ages. I just buy them from the op shop.

If you live in an apartment its possible you already have one of those fold out clothes drying racks. You could totally just hang your catch material from one of those.
 

Attachments

·
Mojave Mo
Joined
·
5,165 Posts
Get the wife her own apartment and you can build a Sling Arcade in yours. I'll bring the ammo and beverages!

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,288 Posts
If Mo shows up I am coming... I will bring pie and more ammo. I am not an uncouth barbarian.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MOJAVE MO

·
Registered
Joined
·
817 Posts
I shoot Indoors a lot but only 1 inch of larger gappers and slingshots although I love pfs style slingshots and have got fairly good with them out of nowhere comes a flier that puts nasty marks in my ceilings that the wife whines about.This only happens with pfs types has never happened with anything else,so they are not for me for indoors shooting.Does this happen to other experienced shooters?
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top