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A catapult is a medieval weapon used for bombarding castles and fortifications, but in this context they are different names for the same thing.
 
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Autumn vs fall. Elevator vs lift. Crisps vs Crisps. Same difference.
 

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british people sometimes call slingshots catapults, creating confusion between the siege weapon and the slingshot (no offence to english people since i am british too ;P). Brits sometimes also call slingshots a katty or a flingy! hope this helps,
sohy
 

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Thanks, that is what I thought but I am a newbie and did not want to be missing something. many more questions to come!
 

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Catipulting is a misnomer that was adopted by those who like to call a boot a trunk. Dont we know that a boot is what you put on your foot and not the ass end of a vehicle.
 

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Catipulting is a misnomer that was adopted by those who like to call a boot a trunk. Dont we know that a boot is what you put on your foot and not the ass end of a vehicle.
I suppose inventing the language gives the British the right to call things and spell things how they like. Trunk is an old English term for the trunks that were carried on the backs of carriages. American is a collection of misnomers adopted by those who like to call an arse an ass. Don't we know that an ass is what you put a saddle on and not the arse end of a person! LOL!! (I'm only "joshing"!!!! I'm Irish anyway!)
 

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Its all about the green man the green. I have seen video of the British pounding the Irish without mercy. Very sad.
 

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OK, I admit right up front that I am English, but there is some logic, sense and reason to this language issue. I recently found a friend who owns a faire booth selling what I would call "catapults" and the basket they were in was labeled "slingshots". Funny thing is that the devices they were selling looked like the one on this site's logo. When I was a kid in England my Dad taught me to make a catapult out of a "Y" shaped stick and rubber tubing. A catapult accelerates a projectile IN A STRAIGHT LINE and upon release the projectile continues on that course, subject to gravity. Also, when I was a kid, I learned in Sunday school that David killed Goliath using a "slingshot". This is a device with cords and a pocket for the projectile. The ends of the cords are held in the hand and the projectile swung in a circle around that central pivot point, accelerating in circles. When one end of the cord is released the projectile flies off in a straight line subject to gravity, powered by the centrifugal force built up by the constrained circling. This "whirling" aspect ,and acceleration through constrained centrifugal force is ESSENTIAL to the term "sling" as used with the term "shot". Hence we see mud SLINGING from a spinning tire. The term SLINGSHOT used to describe space vehicles being captured by the gravity of a planet, accelerated, and then released in a straight line to a far destination. When kids form a line on roller skates the kid on the outside end experiences a SLINGSHOT EFFECT.


When an object continues on a straight path having been accelerated in a straight line it has been CATAPULTED. Hence, when a car rear ends another the occupants are CATAPULTED through the windshield (not slung). Roman siege engines were indeed catapults. A sports car might catapult its occupants from 0 to 60 in a few seconds, but when it corners at speed they might be SLUNG against the doors.

Sorry, No matter what your nationality, a sling is a sling and a catapult is a catapult. Maybe this site needs a new logo, or keep the logo and change the name to "Catapult Forum".


I found this site and this discussion by searching "sling V catapult" as a result of my friend's booth and our ensuing disagreement. I wanted to know if my understanding was correct, or whether this is just a misuse of language. There certainly seems to be confusion even amongst catapult enthusiasts, so I joined the site to put in my two cents worth. I hope that it helps.
 

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Okay, I really dug the post about the difference between the sling and the catapult.

I'll happily muddy things just a touch by discussing the trebuchet, a medieval siege weapon that used a sling to hurl great boulders, but would be called a catapult by anyone who didn't spend their grade school lunches reading about them.

A slingshot is simply a cattapult that someone over here in america has. It may be of interest to know when exactly the catapult made for me by Brooklyn became a slingshot on its journey to me by Royal Post and US Postal Service. I'm not going to lose sleep over it.

I have made several slings as well, and the primary diference between them and the catapult/slingshot is how much worse a shot I am with them. I can hit my four foot wide (1.25 meter) catchbox with my slingshots on a fairly consistant basis, while with the slings I am quite lucky to get my shots within five degrees of the compass direction I am shooting in.
 

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Oh my bloody arse, what is going here? Hey I think that the batteries are run down in my torch! Ops, the fact is I have never been to the Isles. Cheers Lads, Mates, Gent's and Chaps. Hey it's a flip here! Y'all come to Texas yeu-hear. -- Tex-Shooter
 

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I think the 'shot' in slingshot comes from the "shot" used in everything from the Brown Bess Musket (in service with the British military from 1722 to 1838) to the modern Shotgun.
 
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