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Ray Rowden
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2,462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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I wanted a new, flat-topped Jelly Bean to relplace the ply version I shot this winter. I didn't have a natural fork the right size and shape so I went to the woodpile for a chunk of Osage Orange.
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It's a strong hardwood, but for insurance, I like to use my version of the Wombat (Kookaburra Katties) split frame build. It produces grain orientation just like a natty.
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Estimating 22.5 degrees (estimated 90, eyeballed half that for 45, eyeballed half that for 22.5) and used a pull saw to make that cut.
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Then I used the pull say to cut 90 degrees to the new cut face, opened the new pieces butterfly style and glued them up.
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I traced my Jelly Bean on there and cut it out with a coping saw. Slow, I know, but satisfying.
My blank was almost an inch thick, and I had half that in mind, so I went back to the pull saw and sliced away again.
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Surprise! I now had TWO usable blanks! the thinner one did have some punky outer bark on the end of the handle, but there was plenty of solid wood to work with.
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A little filing, sanding and oiling and I'm ready to band 'em up!
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Premium Member
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3,229 Posts
Holy Carpentery skills, Kawkan!

I love this build. I have very simialr tools and skill set... but NOT your skill level! I have a bit of fan boy going on for your flippery and makery.

I have been toying with different fork-tip styles... just recently noticed all my favorite flips are flat-tops.

I am definitely gonna have to copy tgis build technique and soon... to show off for dad on our spring time campout/river fishing trip.
 

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Neophyte
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2,005 Posts
Sweet slingshots you made there. I like the flat top design as well :)
 

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Premium Member
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9,601 Posts
That’s sheer determination cutting Osage with a coping saw! LoL!! Here we call Osage the 100year fence post. Those are beautiful frames buddy. Love the way the grain flip flops. Awesome job!
 

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Ray Rowden
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2,462 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Ray,

Finally had time to set down and read and study the photos. Osage orange is great wood and you got amazing results. Loved the build photos.
Thanks, Greg!

I'm just about surrounded with Osage Orange and Cedar, so most of my builds use them.

I love some of the off-beat techniques that help build sturdy shooters with fairly simple tools.

Good to keep them circulating.
 

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1,380 Posts
Ray,

Finally had time to set down and read and study the photos. Osage orange is great wood and you got amazing results. Loved the build photos.
Thanks, Greg!
I'm just about surrounded with Osage Orange and Cedar, so most of my builds use them.
I love some of the off-beat techniques that help build sturdy shooters with fairly simple tools.
Good to keep them circulating.
If you visit Wombats website he shows strength tests using various woods. It makes so much difference when the grain is oriented this way,

I had a few Osage forks left from when we lived in Illinois, but I think I gave them all away. I don't see any Osage Orange up here.
 

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243 Posts
If that isn't ingenuity there just 'aint none'. Qualifies as artwork... I've a thick slab of maple and just happen to have a Jelly Bean which, next to my Top Shots is the one most likely to find itself in my pocket, to get the measurements down. Certainly not as nicely grained as Osage, but in North Dakota more easily found.
 
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