Slingshots Forum banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,682 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I mean really. Over my almost 60 years of shooting and basically just plain loving slingshots, I have seen many good and very good shooters-even a few great ones.

The recent Slingshot Tournament in China had over 500 entrants in the competition. Incredible participation. To show how good the Chinese shooters are, on the final score card that I saw, the winner and the next 200 or so of his or her buddies were all Chinese.

You have to be impressed with that kind of accuracy. I know some entrants and friends from the U.S, United Kingdom, Spain, Germany, Italy, and a few others-really top shelf shooters that must have been awestruck by the Chinese performance they witnessed.

I'm hearing that most of the Chinese shooters use very small ammo ( 3 to 7 mm ) and very light drawing bands. They must know something!. For any Chinese reading this, you did a fantastic job of setting this event up and organizing the whole thing.

You have many fantastic shooters and I think you all have made our sport a lot more popular around the world because of your enthusiasm and professionalism. Great Job! ( I can only hope that one day I can make one of your great events! ) Shei Shei ( Thank You ) Flatband
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Before attending the 2018 international slingshot tournament in Italy, I made my own slingshots and was perfectly happy just nailing tin cans at 10 yards.

Since this major event, and particularly after having seen the Chinese team perform, and having tried their cleverly designed slingshots with their smaller-sized pouches and ammo they use for an optimized trajectory, I realized that I needed to work very hard to achieve 1.5 to 2 inch wide groups at 10 yards with the Chinese slingshots and the flat band rubber I have since purchased - these products are made with high accuracy potential in mind, and there is so much to learn from their approach.

My shooting has thus much improved since 2018, which is very satisfying indeed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
What would your typical high level Chinese shooter tend to use? I read lighter bands and smaller ammo. I think I saw they tend to use what I call peg head forks.
Mark
Yeah I had seen the slingshot of a previous winner that was Chinese, and he had a peghead fork. Pretty sure they're also called Feihu or something along the lines of that. Do they use any dankungs?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,384 Posts
Well, this slingshot appears to have been the one used by the winning shooter at the Shanghai event:

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000423854832.html?spm=2114.12010612.8148356.57.8e9c3a70O1nbZS

That design speaks for itself in my opinion: a true precision tool for the "job". Stunning.

JPD Madrid published this info about Chinese flat bands on his commercial site, if ever:

https://slingshooting.com/2019/07/09/chinese-slingshot-bands-introduction/

From what I have read elsewhere, flat bands for OTT are extremely popular in China now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Well, this slingshot appears to have been the one used by the winning shooter at the Shanghai event:

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/4000423854832.html?spm=2114.12010612.8148356.57.8e9c3a70O1nbZS

That design speaks for itself in my opinion: a true precision tool for the "job". Stunning.

JPD Madrid published this info about Chinese flat bands on his commercial site, if ever:

https://slingshooting.com/2019/07/09/chinese-slingshot-bands-introduction/

From what I have read elsewhere, flat bands for OTT are extremely popular in China now.
The grip reminds me of a target pistol. I've had this one on my wish list for some time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
What would your typical high level Chinese shooter tend to use? I read lighter bands and smaller ammo. I think I saw they tend to use what I call peg head forks.
Mark
Yeah I had seen the slingshot of a previous winner that was Chinese, and he had a peghead fork. Pretty sure they're also called Feihu or something along the lines of that. Do they use any dankungs?
What size ammo would they use and what band thickness?

Mark

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Mojave Mo
Joined
·
5,160 Posts
I am sure that I read the 'secret' to Chinese accuracy here on The Forum..?
That being teamwork. Teamwork in the form of coaching, emotional support, equipment feedback, more support, testing, more coaching, and practice, practice and more practice. Rinse and repeat for shooting excellence. It is the same formula for all professional and serious athletes in any sport. Suffice to say that slingshooting isn't a hobby for the Chinese!

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
The Chinese have a slingshot culture. My mind cant grip all the slingshot makes and models that come out China. I've made several orders to Dankung, GZK and other Chinese providers on ebay and been well satisfied with the products. It doesn't take much thought to see why they excel and dominate in slingshot shooting. Children start slinging at early ages. I've seen vids of slings being used in their military. There are so many slingshots in China it must rain slingshots there. The Chinese are very good shooters from the starting gate.

I'm not dissing our sporting providers here in the USA. We have a few world class slingshot designers and makers who make outstanding items available to those who look for them. But doing a check to see what is available to prospective shooters here in the US they don't have much of a selection to really spike their interest.

If you check Big 5, Walmart, Cabela's, Bass Pro, Sportsman Warehouse et. al. they carry Marksman, Daisy and a few others. If you take them all out of their encapsulated blister pack and lay them all on a table it would be hard pressed to tell them apart. The majority of them would be black wire frame, black plastic handle, black tube (which I find is much to strong for most beginners) and steel ammo. The marketers of these offerings think that high power is what they should provide. I feel that folks living in urban area cant really shoot outdoors and most shoot indoors. Some communities will allow shooting outdoors but the "missile, arrow or projectile must not leave property boundaries". So high power and steel ammo could be a bit much shooting indoors. New televisions and electronics don't respond very well in an environment like that.

I feel that the slingshot sport needs a lot more publicity. Some exhibition shooting. More slingshot imports of different designs showing up at gun shows, sporting goods and big box stores. I remember back in the 50's seeing Duncan Yoyos expert showing off skills in the playground of my school. I knew I couldn't live with out one had to have one! I know you can do that now. But more advertising and slingshot sports on some of the cable sporting channels would be a good start.

just my :twocents: , others will vary

edit: I guess I could have said all of that by just saying slingshot sports need more exposure and promoting.

'drif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,071 Posts
Well said, 'drif.

I think that this, in part, part stems from the fact that China has one of the strictest gun control regulations in thee world. Essentially, private Chinese citizens cannot posses firearms.

Since we have the constitutional right, I think that most Americans prefer to shoot firearms over slingshots.
 

·
aka CYBORG
Joined
·
2,060 Posts
The Chinese have a slingshot culture. My mind cant grip all the slingshot makes and models that come out China. I've made several orders to Dankung, GZK and other Chinese providers on ebay and been well satisfied with the products. It doesn't take much thought to see why they excel and dominate in slingshot shooting. Children start slinging at early ages. I've seen vids of slings being used in their military. There are so many slingshots in China it must rain slingshots there. The Chinese are very good shooters from the starting gate.

I'm not dissing our sporting providers here in the USA. We have a few world class slingshot designers and makers who make outstanding items available to those who look for them. But doing a check to see what is available to prospective shooters here in the US they don't have much of a selection to really spike their interest.

If you check Big 5, Walmart, Cabela's, Bass Pro, Sportsman Warehouse et. al. they carry Marksman, Daisy and a few others. If you take them all out of their encapsulated blister pack and lay them all on a table it would be hard pressed to tell them apart. The majority of them would be black wire frame, black plastic handle, black tube (which I find is much to strong for most beginners) and steel ammo. The marketers of these offerings think that high power is what they should provide. I feel that folks living in urban area cant really shoot outdoors and most shoot indoors. Some communities will allow shooting outdoors but the "missile, arrow or projectile must not leave property boundaries". So high power and steel ammo could be a bit much shooting indoors. New televisions and electronics don't respond very well in an environment like that.

I feel that the slingshot sport needs a lot more publicity. Some exhibition shooting. More slingshot imports of different designs showing up at gun shows, sporting goods and big box stores. I remember back in the 50's seeing Duncan Yoyos expert showing off skills in the playground of my school. I knew I couldn't live with out one had to have one! I know you can do that now. But more advertising and slingshot sports on some of the cable sporting channels would be a good start.

just my :twocents: , others will vary

edit: I guess I could have said all of that by just saying slingshot sports need more exposure and promoting.

'drif
Good analysis and conclusions. Here's another two cent opinion - Flying under the radar can have merit and raising awareness makes some of us nervous. Many have said that if slingshots had a place in the Olympics, and/or were featured in a movie similar to Red Dawn, the popularity would soar. The biggest obstacle to a popularity surge is that group of regulatory gas bags who have nerf testicles, and are totally consumed with micro aggressions, safe spaces, and all the leftist minutiae related to the hyper new religion in America - anti-racism. (And dodge ball is exclusive, lol). They believe the national anthem should be Kumbaya, and we should be even more regulated than Great Britain. Like everything these days, slinging could become even more politicized, much like the gun culture.



 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
BR your correct, China does have very rigid gun control.

Students of archery know that in the beginning of the 1900's archery was all but forgotten. One day the sole survivor of an ancient native american tribe (Yahi) wondered into civilization. He was brought to a university where a University of California doctor of anthropology studied Ishi and learned of his ways. He became a sensation of the time. Pope and Young became facinated in his hunting skills and learned how to hunt with bow and arrow. From that pioneers in the sport of archery like Howard Hill, Fred Bear and Ben Pearson took to the sport and promoted archery and hunting with bow and arrows. It took a hundred years but look where archery has gone from the day Ishi walked down into civilization. I think slinging has an excellent start and just needs a little nudge to become a favorite sport.

I too own firearms. I can shoot on private property when ever I want, but it is expensive to do so. I shoot a slingshot every day, recycle my ammo. Initial cost of getting a slingshot and shooting at home is cheaper than a single box of centerfire ammo. I think everyone on this forum knows that slinging is a challenge and can be very rewarding when mastered.

'drif
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
I really appreciate Flatband for showing support to the Chinese slingshot community, and yes we were awestrucked by the performance.

I did particiapted in the SH Tournament, though I did only end up at rank 400 something I find the experience really inspiring. Not only I met numerous great shooters across the world, but also witnessing some of the finest domestic shooters in China in action was eye opening.

I could still remember the thick air of tension and silence during the duel between the top two shooters in the finals, and yes, everyone in the stadium was awestrucked by their performances. One thing I could really point out is the poise from the top shooters, especially the champion and the 1st runner up, their abilities to stay calm and be consistent with their shooting form is impressive-and I reckon such skill is crucial for competitive shooters.

When it comes to competitions, they are ALL ABOUT CONSISTENCY. Most competitive Chinese shooters, including myself, stick to lighter set-ups with light ammos (6.4-8mm), I reckon the idea behind is to maximize stability by having more control over your pull and release. I personally shoot 7mm with 0.4 18-10 150mm cut. People should adjust according to the actual performance. Generally, with 6.4-9mm steels balls, the popular tapers are 17-9, 18-10, 1911, 2012 for anything below 0.6. Though I have seen elite medium/long-pull shooters in competitions, but due to the lack of anchor point references it usually takes a longer time to develope consistent shooting with medium/long pulls. Instead, short-pulls is relatively more effective for compeitions. It is the most popular style for competitive shooting for a major reason - solid anchor points (usually on faces). Certainly it differs from personal preferences, short-pull with light set-up further maximizes the consistency per shot with miminal time put into practice. Nonetheless, practices are critical to anyone who wants to develope consistency.

Where medium/long pulls excel at are range, power, and for some, the more badass looking shooting stances, but these factors become less critical in the current format of indoor competitions where only 10 and 15 metres are put to the task. Under the current format, the separation between good and regular competitive shooters is the notorious PAPER TARGET. Paper shooting requires the highest focus and consistency then knock-down targets which provide and immediate results of your shots and trajectory can be traced with ease. In the SH Tournament, shooters could bring along their telescopic equipments for the paper shooting sections. It is rather dull for both the shooters and spectators who could not see how the shots land. Though I personally think paper shooting will remian a critical component of the modern slingshot competition, the entertainment factor has to be raised as competitive slingshot grows.

As the World Slingshot Association (WSA) is officialy founded, they have set out a schedule for international competitions hosted by various countries. We, as a slingshot community, will have more opportunities to interact and learn from each. Hope to see you guys in the soon future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
To fill the gaps above:
- Most competitive Chinese these days shoot with titanium alloy frames with optic fabrics and band clips. I find them to be the most ideal material for competiive slingshot frames atm, it's light yet solid, optic fabrics and quick banding system can be included in most models. The slingshot manufacturing industry is extremely vibrant and advanced with numerous models releasing every year from multiple manufacturers. The quality is getting better as the market thrives and demands for better frames.
- The circular forktips ("feihu" or peg heads) are popular for its easier attachment and for some clearer aim. For most who shoot competitively, including myself, prefers 20mm sloped quick-band forktips.

- For OTT, subject to the design intent, the general fork-widths for competition frames are 75, 80, 85, 90mm (+/-1).

- Since last year, there are more models designed to include adjustable forktips for outter fork width adjustments, some could extend to 120mm. Extremely useful for shooters to respond by adjust to their aiming and actual trajectory. This opens up a new area of model designs and shooting.
- Flatbands pretty much beat tubes in all aspects except durability; you rarely see Chinese competitve shooters using tubes these days. Still, you can spot great shooters from other countries favouring tubes. In SH, for example, the Italians were shooting extremely well with tubes and landed the top ranks among international shooters.

- With lighter set-up, comes smaller pouches. Still it is subject to personal preference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
When it comes to compeitions, they are ALL ABOUT CONSISTENCY. Most competitive Chinese shooters, including myself, stick to lighter set-ups with light ammos (6.4-8mm), I reckon the idea behind is to maximize stability by having more control over your pull and release. I personally shoot 7mm with 0.4 18-10 150mm cut. People should adjust according to the actual performance. Generally, with 6.4-9mm steels balls, the popular tapers are 17-9, 18-10, 1911, 2012 for anything below 0.6. Though I have seen elite medium/long-pull shooters in competitions, but due to the lack of anchor point references it usually takes a longer time to develope consistent shooting with medium/long pulls. Instead, short-pulls is relatively more effective for compeitions. It is the most popular style for competitive shooting for a major reason - solid anchor points (usually on faces). Certainly it differs from personal preferences, short-pull with light set-up further maximizes the consistency per shot with miminal time put into practice.
That's good stuff! Thanks!

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top