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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, I am thinking about trying my hand carving spoons, don't know why, just sounds fun. :)

I would like to know what you all use to carve with? any suggestions as to a good wood to work with? any knives that have worked well for you?

Thanks in advance for any ideas and advice you can provide :)
 

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I've just bought a flexcut spoon carvin knife and it's fantastic, but really expensive.

Rough riders old timer is okay but the quality of the metal is rubbish and the slipjoints have no weight to them at all.

Mora and flexcut do really nice fixed blade gouges, if you're on a budget deffo go for one of those and a sak huntsman.

I've carved many forks with a sak they're fantastic especially when paired with a fallniven dc4, I'll upload a pic of the shoe box I have at home filled with weird forks and spoons lol
 

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Neophyte
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the recommendations :) anyone have any experience with something like this:


or this:


Thanks :)
 

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I've had an old timer splinter carvin thingymabob and they're not good, if you're carving on the go I'd advise to get a fixed blade gouge from Mora or flex cut, a SAK huntsman, and a fallniven dc4, because they're high quality and budget freindly.

The SAK's saw is perfect for cutlery sized pieces of wood, you can carve wedges to split the wood, Felix immler on YouTube has loads of videos about it.

If money is not an issue check out flex cut's folding carving multi knives, I managed to grab a spoon carving jack for £90 and it's great, but the gouge is too close to the handle, limiting manoeuvrability.

I haven't much experience in what would be best for a workshop setup.

Also please invest in a first aid kit, you are going to cut yourself and it most likely will be bad lol
 

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I've had an old timer splinter carvin thingymabob and they're not good, if you're carving on the go I'd advise to get a fixed blade gouge from Mora or flex cut, a SAK huntsman, and a fallniven dc4, because they're high quality and budget freindly.

The SAK's saw is perfect for cutlery sized pieces of wood, you can carve wedges to split the wood, Felix immler on YouTube has loads of videos about it.

If money is not an issue check out flex cut's folding carving multi knives, I managed to grab a spoon carving jack for £90 and it's great, but the gouge is too close to the handle, limiting manoeuvrability.

I haven't much experience in what would be best for a workshop setup.

Also please invest in a first aid kit, you are going to cut yourself and it most likely will be bad lol
I totally agree with all of what you said.


Robert, you can get that Stop Bleed stuff at Walmart in sporting goods section. Totally worth it.


Also a good Mora and cabinet scrappers are excellent starters. I never actually carved a spoon yet.

Mostly made wierd sticks and smoothed some natty handles.
 

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SLING-N-SHOT
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I carved a many a bird with these knives...Give one or two a try.

That’s KNOTT a knife……this is a knife ! LOL

( sorry Stuart couldn’t resist that line from a classic movie ) [mention]Slide-Easy [/mention]




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Darrell Allen

** SlingLyfe Band Up **
 

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Thanks for the recommendations :) anyone have any experience with something like this:


or this:


Thanks :)
I used to have the old timer set, I cannot recommend it. Something like a moraknife is far better. Currently I use a handmade japanese Kiridashi style knife for carving
 
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