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Hello ladies and gents, I recently picked up the hobby of plinking slingshots. I had a catty that i baught from walmart, but I decided to tempt fate and make my own. After research and some help from Jorg's channel on youtube, I came out with a halfway decent plywood hammergrip slingshot with theraband gold that shoots wonderfully. Trouble is...now I love making slingshots. So far I have made 2 more using rough outlines drawn from pictures found on google images (I was just trying to get the hang of things, and I'd rather use designs that were already working), but i do apologize if i used a template from a fellow member, so I won't post pics.

Now, the only trouble im having with the cattys im making is the fact that they're drop dead ugly. So researching the corners of the internet, i found out about dymondwood, which is, in my opinion, an absolutely beautiful wood. The manufacturer only sells in bulk. So i went searching for resellers. I have found a small knife making supplies company that sells 5" (127 mm)x10" (254mm) blanks of 3/8" (9.52 mm) dymondwood. I usually work with 3/4" (19 mm) wood. SO, my question is, is it safe to coat one side of the blank with glue, leave them in a jig overnight, then use it SAFELY for a slingshot?

Thanks,
kyle
 

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I'm not familiar with this wood yet it is wood and I doubt it has some inhibiting character to resist gluing. Wood glues often set in a very short time if the wood is clamped (read directions drying time).

Therefore, you should have no problem glueing them back to back. In fact I think I noticed the post of Fish's of a dymond wood catty, here on the site, his wood appeared have an extra thickness in the middle ply perhaps indicating he glued.
 

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my experience with this product demands high strength epoxy glue, NOT regular wood glue; consistent 'roughing' of the glued surfaces, and good glue application with clamping strength determined by the glue type and sufficient curing time. It polishes well, but is hard on saw blades, and requires a mask while cutting and sanding. It's mean on router bits also. It's also MUCH heavier than most wood, and doesn't need any kind of coating, just polishing.

Epoxy has a set time depending on temperature and mixing ratio. I doubt if any good epoxy will set overnight ready to accept the stress of slingshot use. I'd give it a few days.

That said, I wonder what and why you need to glue this stuff. I only glued it to knife blades, and used pins and rivets to hold the handle in place as the wood/metal joint is always subject to failure from a variety of reasons.

If I were gluing a thin sheet of micarta to wood, I would use a brand name epoxy, not the dollar store variety, IAW instructions, roughen the surface well, moderate clamp strength to prevent a starved joint and wait several days before stressing it.

Be Well
 

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Hey Pulse,
You just need to use a two part, high strength epoxy. You can find it almost anywhere these days. Just don't use the 5 min. epoxy, though tempting because of time it is just not the same strength. Mix it, apply epoxy, clamp overnight (however long the instructions say) cut, shape and it should be great and nearly indestructible. Don't forget to use a respirator mask when cutting, shaping and sanding since the fumes and dust is hazardous.
Love to see what you come up with!!!
All the best,
Perry
 

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my experience with this product demands high strength epoxy glue, NOT regular wood glue; consistent 'roughing' of the glued surfaces, and good glue application with clamping strength determined by the glue type and sufficient curing time. It polishes well, but is hard on saw blades, and requires a mask while cutting and sanding. It's mean on router bits also. It's also MUCH heavier than most wood, and doesn't need any kind of coating, just polishing.

Epoxy has a set time depending on temperature and mixing ratio. I doubt if any good epoxy will set overnight ready to accept the stress of slingshot use. I'd give it a few days.

That said, I wonder what and why you need to glue this stuff. I only glued it to knife blades, and used pins and rivets to hold the handle in place as the wood/metal joint is always subject to failure from a variety of reasons.

If I were gluing a thin sheet of micarta to wood, I would use a brand name epoxy, not the dollar store variety, IAW instructions, roughen the surface well, moderate clamp strength to prevent a starved joint and wait several days before stressing it.

Be Well
Glad you wrote this and he didn't just go on my thought. I should know to expressly say to check for sure with someone or the company that makes the product what to use. Thanks for the info.
 

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I have used Dymonwood on my knives. I use epoxy and pins.

The issue with slingshots is that they tend to bend just a little bit. Sometimes this is enough to cause a shear delamination. If you make it really thick it shouldn't be a problem. If you make it thin enough for each side to be bendy, then the front side will effectively try to get shorter than the back under tension. At this point it may delaminate. Whether you glue it, or just use a laminate, pins will prevent this shearing and greatly enhance the strength.
 

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Wow, you guys are on the ball with responses.

Thanks to everyone for the advice. I figured i might have to use something of higher strength. I will look at my local hardware stores for some high strength epoxy.

ZPD, it will be two pieces of epoxied 3/8" (9.52mm) dymondwood toataling 3/4" (19mm). Do you believe that will be thick enough? And do you have any guides for how to put pins in? And i would preferr a brass color if possible
 

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I would have thought you'd be fine then. Pins are optional, but if you get a crack forming, you can always retrofit pins. The basic pin is just some 1/8" or 1/4" rod epoxied into a round hole. If you need a mechanical fitting, you can use threaded ends like a Croby Bolt or Loveless Bolts. I wouldn't have thought you'd need to go so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
kk, thanks ZDP. I figured 3/4" was thick enough.
 
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