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Premium Member
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I always thought the main purpose of a lanyard was, you know, to keep you from dropping your slingshot. Turns out there's alot more to it than that.
I watched Bill Hays' video about his Ranger slingshot and there's a bit at the beginning where he talks about the lanyard and does a demonstration of how, with a properly set up lanyard, you can hold with index finger and thumb while you pull back the bands and all the force is directed into the wrist. The other fingers can be opened up from the handle without a loss of control. It's like a wrist-braced slingshot without the bulk, in theory.
How does it work ?
Very well, thank you!
I added a lanyard to three of my slingshots and tried them out.
Shoe Plant Azure Wood Textile


I got an improvement in stability right away. I put my hand through the lanyard and twisted the slingshot until I achieved the desired tension. I think it will especially help the Tex replica on the right. This one is very accurate for me, but my form tends to suffer after a good number of shots. The extra bracing should fix that. The ugly black one had some extra girth because of the palmswell and has a shorter handle so I made one hole through the front and one up from the bottom so the lanyard comes out below. Bill, I promise I'll have an original idea someday!
Give this a try on your next slingshot, I think you'll like it!
Oh yeah, the lanyards are made of paracord, incase anyone was wondering.
 

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Philly
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yes, Bill's video caught my attention as well. My grandson has been having trouble with wrist shake with anything but the lightest bands and has been asking me to make a Hammer grip with a thumb hole for him. I don't like the idea of his thumb being in line with the shot. I think the lanyard will be a big help for him. Funny, he can pull a 65# compound no problem but the slingshot causes him a problem. I know with the compound the force is equal top and bottom so the lanyard should provide similar support.
Philly
 

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Philly
Joined
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2,576 Posts
yes, Bill's video caught my attention as well. My grandson has been having trouble with wrist shake with anything but the lightest bands and has been asking me to make a Hammer grip with a thumb hole for him. I don't like the idea of his thumb being in line with the shot. I think the lanyard will be a big help for him. Funny, he can pull a 65# compound no problem but the slingshot causes him a problem. I know with the compound the force is equal top and bottom so the lanyard should provide similar support.
Philly
Well, had to give it a try, ran down stairs to the shop and added a lanyard to my Yew Natural, wow what a difference. This sling is small and would almost jump out of my hand when I shot it. Much more stable grip and no chance of it flying away after a shot. I like a soft grip, when I tighten up to much on the fork it effects my accuracy. Thanks for the tip guys.
Philly
 

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Premium Member
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Yeah, when you start using the smaller slingshots a lanyard is a really good idea... If using heavier bands, you'll want to use a lanyard for sure. Not only does it make the shooting much more stable, but you don't have to worry about the slingshot slipping out of your hand and cutting the **** out of your face.
Being winter now and gloves being worn a lot, it can make the grip on a slingshot even a large one harder... use your lanyard!
 
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