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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently shooting an Axiom Ocularis frame with 1/2" TBG bands and 1/4" steel ammo.
I shoot sidearm ("Gangster") OTT style, and draw to an anchor point at the corner of my mouth.
This frame requires a thumb braced hold. I've learned that more or less thumb pressure will cause my shots to go high or low, respectively.
What I have NOT yet discovered is what makes me miss to the right or left.
I'm shooting at a 1-7/8" round spinner from 10 meters (33 feet).
I've looked carefully at centering the ammo in the pouch, pinching ON the ammo, and not twisting the pouch.
I've also looked at my stance: feet parallel to the target.
Maybe I'm expecting too much progress too soon. I'm hitting the spinner about 3 shots out of every 25-30.
I usually get one or two hits fairly soon after starting, then 1 good hit and a couple of nicks later, then I start missing either to the right or left and begin to get frustrated.
Any ideas on what else I should be looking at to Improve my accuracy?
Bob
 

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Ray Rowden
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Small reactive targets like your spinner are challenging and rewarding when hit.

Keep smacking that thing!

But you may want to add some other targets to your session. A variety of spinners sizes often helps keep the shooters attention.

I like to start an occasional session with a paper, blank except for single vertical and horizontal lines that meet in the center. That center is my aiming point. I take about 10 shots at that point, with no adjustments to correct misses.

The shot pattern is then available for study. There is a record of hits and misses that the spinner won't provide.

Good luck and keep shooting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, Kawkan!
I was shooting those "Shoot 'n See" targets that change color at the point of impact.
Of course, those get to be a bit pricey, so after I was consistently hitting in the center 6-8" of the target, I switched to the spinner for economy's sake.
At your suggestion I will return to paper and hope someone can offer a suggestion as to WHY I am shooting to the right and left.
Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OK, G.G.!
I hadn't thought of that yet.
I THINK I am first looking over my reference point at the target, the tilting my head to the right to see down the band to the reference point, and finally moving my frame holding hand to get that picture lined up with the target.
Maybe if I drew first and got my sight line down the band to the reference point and moved that whole "assembly" in line with the target I would see more consistent results. Just a change of sequence.
Does that even make any sense to anyone else?
Thanks!
Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi, Matt and Apricot!
If my frame holding arm is truly horizontal, then varying thumb pressure should be the factor for controlling the elevation part of aiming, given the use of the same anchor point each time.
I've tried that and it seems to be true. I haven't yet developed muscle memory to automatically employ the right amount of pressure on a consistent basis, but I'm at least aware of the issue and am working on it. Practice, practice, practice!
Thinking back on watching that video where the little Phillipino (?) kid shot clay balls into the open end of a Coke bottle using a natural fork frame; he would draw vertically and anchor against his cheek, then he would rotate his arm down until he aligned with the target, and released.
I guess you're sort of building a "rifle" with the reference point on the frame as your front sight, and the bands drawn back to the anchor point as the "barrel" and sight ramp. If you are looking down the band to your reference point before you bring the target into view, then place the reference point directly on top of your target, absent a sloppy release it seems like you should hit the target.
At the very least, it's an interesting theory.
I'm going to pursue this and Kaw's suggestion and see what that yields.
Stay tuned!
Bob
 

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When I started I kept my anchor in one spot and unknowingly canted the frame to compensate for varying fork widths. It worked as long as the forks were on the wide side and I didn't switch things up too much. Of course I would have sworn I wasn't canting the frame until I caught a glimpse of my reflection in the microwave door while shooting in the house :D Now I'm pretty sure I don't cant, and I still shoot in front of the microwave from time to time to make sure. I use a combination of set up and anchor point to adjust for high and low at 10 yards. Then I use a form of Kentucky windage (fire arms) or gaping (archery) to adjust for distance. I either point the fork towards the target or flip the fork towards the target to move the shot left, and twist & tweak to move the shot right. I used to always twist the pouch for that reason, but lately I've been holding the ammo instead of the pouch (requires big ammo in a small pouch) So I can get a tweak without a twist, and because of the reduced pouch weight I get to decide if I want to shoot a little faster or draw a little lighter.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hi, Bob E.!
I had a shorter shooting session today. I fired at the spinner 30 times, hitting it solidly twice, and nicking it enough to move it probably 6 or 7 times more.
Then I took the suggestion to put up a paper with crosshairs on it and a dot in the middle. This showed that the majority of my misses are going to the left of the target.
I'm not sure what's causing that, but sometimes I feel like as I release the pouch, I am pushing the frame to the left which would explain that.
That involuntary movement of my frame holding hand might be a bit tough to eliminate as it is a natural reaction to the release of the tension on the bands.
Does anyone have an idea what to do about this, or am I getting to the point of overthinking this? (Not that it would change my approach if I was!) :)
Bob
 

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Hi, Bob E.!
I had a shorter shooting session today. I fired at the spinner 30 times, hitting it solidly twice, and nicking it enough to move it probably 6 or 7 times more.
Then I took the suggestion to put up a paper with crosshairs on it and a dot in the middle. This showed that the majority of my misses are going to the left of the target.
I'm not sure what's causing that, but sometimes I feel like as I release the pouch, I am pushing the frame to the left which would explain that.
That involuntary movement of my frame holding hand might be a bit tough to eliminate as it is a natural reaction to the release of the tension on the bands.
Does anyone have an idea what to do about this, or am I getting to the point of overthinking this? (Not that it would change my approach if I was!) :)
Bob
If you are torquing the frame on release, then conciously push your whole arm the opposite side. After a while it should resolve itself.
Keep in mind that even a tiny bit of tension, in whichever muscle, is completely unwanted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks, guys!
Yes, it seems counterintuitive to use LESS of a grip on the frame, but hey, if it works, fine!
I was thinking that I would try hyperextending my frame holding arm to eliminate the remaining distance that I could push the frame when the band tension was released. But then I realized that I'm not actually pushing the frame further away, but rather "flipping" it with wrist motion.
Shooting will come later today, but I'll try to put some of these suggestions into play and report back.
Bob
 

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You can try a lanyard (I use a loop of paracord) around your wrist. Tighten it just enough so that when you draw the bands the slingshot will stay in position in your hand without gripping tightly with you fingers. When you grip too tightly you have a tendency to push forward. When you release you flip the slingshot. Also heavy bands make you flip when you release.
 

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Bob...Had that same problem, drove me crazy! Make sure to check band alignment before firing. I was guilty of pulling the top fork (ttf) slightly to the left before release. Get those fork tips absolutely vertical and perpendicular to the target. After that it is mostly a smooth release. Keep shooting, you WILL get better!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks, guys!
Grandpa, my Axiom Ocularis came with a para cord lanyard, but I have never socked it down on my wrist. I'll try that! When I go to bigger ammo and heavier bands, like you said, I think that some frame flip will be unavoidable.
S Jazz, I DO shoot better when I carefully align the frame.
I appreciate all of the tips!
Bob
 

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If you're bending your arm that holds the slingshot your going to be all over the place with your shot . And if you're slouching at all that will throw your shots off . If shooting gangster style make sure your not rotating a little counter clockwise with your slingshot.

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The following videos show my perspective when shooting a slingshot..... very, very similar to how you aim a shotgun... cheek to bead to target, compensate for lead if it's moving.



This video shows how to aim a slingshot, the more common way


This one shows how to do it with a longer draw

 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hi, P.Pilot, CMA and Bill!
Taking things one at a time, in the short time I had to practice today I tried the lanyard bit.
Putting my hand through the loop, I twisted it until it just closed on my wrist, but not too tight.
Then I concentrated on keeping my grip on the frame light, but keeping the forks vertical.
This made another incremental, but definitely noticeable improvement in my accuracy. I actually hit the spinner solidly twice in a row, and nicked it the third shot!
AND, not trying to smash the frame with my grip made a SIGNIFICANT improvement in my comfort!
I'm not quite sure what was meant by the "follow through" with the frame hand. I didn't pay much attention to what my frame hand was doing after the release today. I'll try to incorporate that tomorrow. What should I look for?
Bill, I shoot OTT at this time. Should I switch to TTF?
To repeat, I'm shooting 1/4" ammo on straight cut 1/2 TBG bands which are holding up very well.
I probably need to fine tune my stance a bit to get more steady. One thing at a time!
Thanks to all for the great suggestions! It encourages me to see the improvements as I incorporate them into my routine!
Bob
 
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