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Hi all,

This one started as a not so good looking fork:

Wood Trunk Natural material Bedrock Soil


However, soon it started to look better:

Wood Human body Trunk Artifact Art


I decided to leave the handle a bit too long, simply liked it (and I can always cut it short if I wanted). As you can see, its front handle side is done Quercusuber stile, with a ridge along it:

Wood Plant Natural material Musical instrument Vegetable


The other side I did not want to carve much, I left it pritty much as it was:

Wood Terrestrial plant Natural material Thumb Plant


I cut the target-side of the forks Metropolicity stile, with a long diagonal cut along the fork which ends in a flat surface very well suited to accept the bands; the other side of the forks is also done under an angle, but less, just enough so that the bands do not touch much of the forks because of resistance; i hope it is visible here::

Gesture Finger Wood Thumb Nail


Some parts of the fork had a deep places with remnants of the bark which if I sanded of would leave a huge dent; I decided to leave it so and to pretend that it is an intentional beauty spot on the fork:

Plant Organism Mushroom Terrestrial plant Twig


Finaly, it is banded with 18 to 12 mm Precise Green and I tried it - it shoots 8 mm lead like mad:

Hand tool Tool Pruning shears Wood Natural material


Hand tool Musical instrument Wood Tool Plant


It is soaked under the tap water, hair-dried and sanded with ever more fine sanding cloth three times and was finally coated with my mixture of Turpentine-BLO-Bees Wax.

I hope you enjoyed,

cheers,

jazz
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
very nice @jazz, like that one a LOT..........what kind of wood is it, do you know ?

( The grain reminds me of Maple )
Thank you, SLING-N-SHOT! I found it on the ground and I think it is hornbeam.

Very nice indeed!!
Thank you Island made!

Definitely a nice one
Thank you Tag, very much!

Long story short....I like it!! In leaving the handle long IMHO is good as we all know it's easier to take wood off than the try and put it back on :)
I think you are definitely right, Old Iowan, thanks!

I loved that little journey! What a great shooter too!
Thank you treeman, I am glad you enjoyed!

cheers,

jazz
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nice one Jazz !
Thanks, Port boy!!

Leave it long! Lots of character.
I will, String Slap, thanks!

Very nice!!
Thank you, devils son in law!!

Awesome! and a build-along, too.

Thanks, man.
Thanks, MakoPat, I am glad you like it!

Gorgeous work. I love seeing the transformation from raw wood to finished project.
Thanks, MikeyLikesit, I was surprised with the transformation myself.

cheers,

jazz
 

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Unfortunately, missed this one...

What a BEAUTIFUL fork!! Simple, natural and with a clever design!! :naughty: :bowdown:

Should be sweet indeed shooting with it!!!!

What's your input on soaking the wood in water?? Never did it, but I've heard it will open the wood surface, making it more suitable to sanding.

Also I'm not a big fan of epoxying cavities and cracks on my builds. Usually some of these "deformities" give lots of character to the frame (as long as they're not structural flaws that can compromise the slingshot integrity)

Best regards!!!!

Q
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Unfortunately, missed this one...

What a BEAUTIFUL fork!! Simple, natural and with a clever design!! :naughty: :bowdown:

Should be sweet indeed shooting with it!!!!

What's your input on soaking the wood in water?? Never did it, but I've heard it will open the wood surface, making it more suitable to sanding.

Also I'm not a big fan of epoxying cavities and cracks on my builds. Usually some of these "deformities" give lots of character to the frame (as long as they're not structural flaws that can compromise the slingshot integrity)

Best regards!!!!

Q
Thank you, Quercususuber, very much, for your comments, they really mean a lot to me!!

The reason why I soak forks in water, hair-dry them and then sand them - at least three times repeating the process with ever more fine sanding paper in between - is because the wood filaments when they get soaked in water tend to grow, or, bubble up, or so - sorry English is not my first language... - so when you dry them (I use hair dryer) you then can sand that growth off.

I think that somebody here in the forum reported that his friend who makes butts for rifles does that 8 or 9 times. In this way, I guess, you not only make the surface smooth but you enable it to stay smooth in case it receives, later, some humidity, or so.

To be honest, I do not have to do it, I can do regular sanding, but it gives me kind of a procedure that is "sacred" to me and I follow it for the sake of it..

I hope this explains,

best regards, my friend, I learned a lot from you!
 

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Unfortunately, missed this one...
What a BEAUTIFUL fork!! Simple, natural and with a clever design!! :naughty: :bowdown:
Should be sweet indeed shooting with it!!!!
What's your input on soaking the wood in water?? Never did it, but I've heard it will open the wood surface, making it more suitable to sanding.
Also I'm not a big fan of epoxying cavities and cracks on my builds. Usually some of these "deformities" give lots of character to the frame (as long as they're not structural flaws that can compromise the slingshot integrity)
Best regards!!!!
Q
Thank you, Quercususuber, very much, for your comments, they really mean a lot to me!!

The reason why I soak forks in water, hair-dry them and then sand them - at least three times repeating the process with ever more fine sanding paper in between - is because the wood filaments when they get soaked in water tend to grow, or, bubble up, or so - sorry English is not my first language... - so when you dry them (I use hair dryer) you then can sand that growth off.

I think that somebody here in the forum reported that his friend who makes butts for rifles does that 8 or 9 times. In this way, I guess, you not only make the surface smooth but you enable it to stay smooth in case it receives, later, some humidity, or so.

To be honest, I do not have to do it, I can do regular sanding, but it gives me kind of a procedure that is "sacred" to me and I follow it for the sake of it..

I hope this explains,

best regards, my friend, I learned a lot from you!
I do that as well. Just not that many times. Once or twice us usually good enough for me.
 

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Very nice.

Oh in the US, it is called whiskering. You soak it quickly and then hit it with the heat. This makes all the small fibers on the outside want to curl up. You know all this, but I thought someone else might not. Sorry to sound like a smartoff, but I am an incurable helper. :help:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Very nice.

Oh in the US, it is called whiskering. You soak it quickly and then hit it with the heat. This makes all the small fibers on the outside want to curl up. You know all this, but I thought someone else might not. Sorry to sound like a smartoff, but I am an incurable helper. :help:
No, SJAaz, you do not sound like a smartoff, you taught me, and probably some other people, the right term for this technique, thanks!
 
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