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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am missing a step somewhere. I am trying to make the best "fit for me" SS I can. I cut one out the other day , sanded, then laquered. It looks good but I cannot figure out how to laquer it without drips and Grooves from where I suspended it so I could spray the whole thing. I see, And own some beautifully finished SS's but I do not know how to finish one off for myself. I have heard of buffing????? Do oyu all do that? Can anyone list some of the steps they go through building one? THanks for the help!
 

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My best advice (with great deference to the master wood workers on this forum) is to:

1: Put a screw or a small nail in the base of the handle so that you can stand the frame upright by clamping the nail in a vise or pair of vise grip pliers or just a plain c-clamp.

2: Whatever your finish (I use a polyurethane), thin it, thin it, thin it (I use so-called odorless paint thinner) ... I make my finish almost like water.

3. Apply the finish with the tip of your index finger ... no brush, no cloth, just your finger. Get a drop on your finger and rub it in ... apply another drop and rub it in ... etc. Start at the forks and work your way down to your nail/screw.

4. Let the thing stand in a dust free, well ventilated area for the amount of time specified on the container of finish product, and then apply a second, and maybe a third coat.

5. After the final coat, let the whole thing dry for a good 48 hours.

There is a good tutorial on using CA glue for a finish ... check it out here:

http://slingshotforum.com/topic/14430-ca-glue-finishes-how-we-do-it-at-flippinout-slingshots/

Cheers ....... Charles
 

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My best advice (with great deference to the master wood workers on this forum) is to:

1: Put a screw or a small nail in the base of the handle so that you can stand the frame upright by clamping the nail in a vise or pair of vise grip pliers or just a plain c-clamp.

2: Whatever your finish (I use a polyurethane), thin it, thin it, thin it (I use so-called odorless paint thinner) ... I make my finish almost like water.

3. Apply the finish with the tip of your index finger ... no brush, no cloth, just your finger. Get a drop on your finger and rub it in ... apply another drop and rub it in ... etc. Start at the forks and work your way down to your nail/screw.

4. Let the thing stand in a dust free, well ventilated area for the amount of time specified on the container of finish product, and then apply a second, and maybe a third coat.

5. After the final coat, let the whole thing dry for a good 48 hours.

There is a good tutorial on using CA glue for a finish ... check it out here:

http://slingshotforu...out-slingshots/

Cheers ....... Charles
wow, there's some good tips there Charles! have you ever tried soaking something in a thinned out varnish?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thank you charles. thatis good advice.... what about the "screw hole" that is left? Sand it out and just apply coating there?
 

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My best advice (with great deference to the master wood workers on this forum) is to:

1: Put a screw or a small nail in the base of the handle so that you can stand the frame upright by clamping the nail in a vise or pair of vise grip pliers or just a plain c-clamp.

2: Whatever your finish (I use a polyurethane), thin it, thin it, thin it (I use so-called odorless paint thinner) ... I make my finish almost like water.

3. Apply the finish with the tip of your index finger ... no brush, no cloth, just your finger. Get a drop on your finger and rub it in ... apply another drop and rub it in ... etc. Start at the forks and work your way down to your nail/screw.

4. Let the thing stand in a dust free, well ventilated area for the amount of time specified on the container of finish product, and then apply a second, and maybe a third coat.

5. After the final coat, let the whole thing dry for a good 48 hours.

There is a good tutorial on using CA glue for a finish ... check it out here:

http://slingshotforu...out-slingshots/

Cheers ....... Charles
wow, there's some good tips there Charles! have you ever tried soaking something in a thinned out varnish?
[/quote]

A LOT of years ago I worked in a small factory producing long handled bar-b-que forks, knives, and flippers. The handles were wood; we dipped them and hung them by magnets over a drip trough. That is fine for high volume production, and the occasional drip or run was not a big deal. But I would not do my slingshots that way ... just a personal preference. I do not see any need to soak in varnish ... maybe in boilded linseed oil, but not in varnish. The dip method can work, but you almost always get an unsightly blob at the lowest end.

Cheers .... Charles
 

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thank you charles. thatis good advice.... what about the "screw hole" that is left? Sand it out and just apply coating there?
I never bother about the screw hole ... just ignore it. For the most part it will not be seen anyway, since it is in the end of the handle. If you are really picky, you could mix a bit of sawdust with some of your finish and fill the hole ... but that is just another time-consuming step.

Cheers ........ Charles
 

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A LOT of years ago I worked in a small factory producing long handled bar-b-que forks, knives, and flippers. The handles were wood; we dipped them and hung them by magnets over a drip trough. That is fine for high volume production, and the occasional drip or run was not a big deal. But I would not do my slingshots that way ... just a personal preference. I do not see any need to soak in varnish ... maybe in boilded linseed oil, but not in varnish. The dip method can work, but you almost always get an unsightly blob at the lowest end.
cool, I was wondering if it had even been done. thank you
 

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I dont like putting holes in the slingshot with screws.
I lay mine flat, suspended by a couple pieces of scrap wood, and spray laquer from above. A quick coat, let dry, and do the other side, along with the edges, and throat.
The laquer I use dries fast and I can do multiple coats in about a half hour. No runs, and I can control the amount that goes on.
Rustoleum clear laquer is good stuff in my book.
Usually 3 light coats, does the trick. Sand with fine steel wool between the coats. When totally dry, I then will buff it with a cotton cloth wheel.
Everyone has their own way, and this is what I find works the best for me.
 

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See The Target
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A little trick is to make a rotating holder from an old microwave motor. ( They rotate extremely slow ) Fishing rod builders use this trick to rotate the rod so the glue on the guides dries evenly. (No runs or drips for a perfectly even surface)Custom fishing lures are also painted this way.Works on any thing you want to finish.
 

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A little trick is to make a rotating holder from an old microwave motor. ( They rotate extremely slow ) Fishing rod builders use this trick to rotate the rod so the glue on the guides dries evenly. (No runs or drips for a perfectly even surface)Custom fishing lures are also painted this way.Works on any thing you want to finish.
Could you have posted this a bit sooner, like a couple of days ago. Because my grandparents just threw out a couple of microwaves just the other day. oh well
 
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