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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading some of Bill Hays' posts about the benifits of through-the-fork band shooting so I thought I'd give a go at making a compatible sling for this design. I got it all cut and shaped, tied on some bands and took a couple dozen shots. Didn't work that well for me. Then my band broke.
So, discouraged, I went ahead and threw on a set of 1842 looped tubes I had. I figured it already had the holes and slots that I was going to use for tying on the bands to the insides of the fork. It looked like this--

I shot it a couple of times and was suprised by the accuracy right out of the box (or, as it were, the saw). I made a few more modifications to the tops for better tube guides and shot some more. After a bit of practice I ended up going 23 for 25 on a Coke can at 21ft. Nothing special for many of you I'm sure, but more consistant than I've been in the four months of shooting I've done. I also went 6 for 10 from 33 feet, but it is very cold and windy so I didn't try any more from there.
I know I need to finish it but so far I can't put it down long enough!
Credit where credit is due: The shape of this one is from mxred91's design and the fork design is inspired by Bill's Hathcock Target Sniper , which is my all time favorite slingshot.
 

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Mystery wood.
It seems pretty stout. I got it from the leftover pile at the hardware store.
Nice job. Really nice workmanship. It looks like it could be pine, be careful, make sure you are confident in the strength. If a piece breaks off it will come back at you and could cause injury. I really like the way you designed it, I just don't trust pine, it breaks without warning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Mystery wood.
It seems pretty stout. I got it from the leftover pile at the hardware store.
Nice job. Really nice workmanship. It looks like it could be pine, be careful, make sure you are confident in the strength. If a piece breaks off it will come back at you and could cause injury. I really like the way you designed it, I just don't trust pine, it breaks without warning.

[/quote]
Would a soak in polyeurethane on spar varnish help with strength? If so, how long should it stay in and then dry?
 

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I have to say, excellent effort, the best sling from you yet. I think you are getting the hang of it. I really like what you've done going with the tubes Hathcock style it looks good.

Yet, unfortunately it looks like pine to me as well, which is not a good thing. All I can say is try the ole finger nail test to see if you can make a scratch/indent on the wood...meaning it is not hardwood.....and maybe try and smell the the board, you may get some remnants of pine wood sent. That's all I can think of, that and a vice test to ensure it is sound, wooden forks flying at the face a 175fps aren't very pleasant.

But, it looks like a great shooter so you should take the time and effort to make sure your observations are correct, that is not something you want to just toss away because you think it smells like pine!
(vice test will do).......and no the varnish will not add strength.

That looks like a shooter! Though i would use plywood or micarta.
Not everyone has the access nor the money for micarta, Frodo, hence his is from the leftover pile (scrounging work well doesn't it?
), yes plywood is good......but do not just count out the efficiency of a good hardwood frame. That is what has been the basic norm for a boardcut for a long time, and it never stopped working.

Keep it up Aamj, looks like you are really off and running. and 23/25 is very good.

Cheers - John
 

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ALWAYS have been a huge fan of TTT slingshots. I use all kinds, but that type is my favorite! Flatband
 

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Mystery wood.
It seems pretty stout. I got it from the leftover pile at the hardware store.
Nice job. Really nice workmanship. It looks like it could be pine, be careful, make sure you are confident in the strength. If a piece breaks off it will come back at you and could cause injury. I really like the way you designed it, I just don't trust pine, it breaks without warning.

[/quote]
Would a soak in polyeurethane on spar varnish help with strength? If so, how long should it stay in and then dry?
[/quote]

Minwax makes a wood hardener. It is about $- $10- $12 a 16 ounce can. Then I would use polyurethane. I just saw the hardener at hardware store yesterday. I thought I would share that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
It's definately not the softest wood I've ever used. I had this other stuff with barely any grain that basically turned to powder when you cut it! I don't use those slings anymore.
That being said after a closer inspection (fine, a first inspection) this wood may not be that great either. It takes a good hard scratch with a thumbnail, but it can be done. I like this design enough that I'll go and spring for the 6 or 8 dollar 1x6 of ash or hickory or something. I'll check out the laminate but I don't think my local hardware store sells anything good.
Thanks for the compliments!
 

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It's definately not the softest wood I've ever used. I had this other stuff with barely any grain that basically turned to powder when you cut it! I don't use those slings anymore.
That being said after a closer inspection (fine, a first inspection) this wood may not be that great either. It takes a good hard scratch with a thumbnail, but it can be done. I like this design enough that I'll go and spring for the 6 or 8 dollar 1x6 of ash or hickory or something. I'll check out the laminate but I don't think my local hardware store sells anything good.
Thanks for the compliments!
The weakest point will likely be the shortest vertical grain distance at your band attachment. I would not count on any topically applied finish or wood treatment to strengthen it significantly. If you have access to Hickory that would be my first choice. Ash or red oak may also bear the strain provided it is straight grained wood with Thin earlywood rings (the darker color ring) and thicker latewood rings. I think it is really cool, hope it works out for you. sounds like it is a really good shooter.
 

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Ok, update. Same design, now with increased hardness! I realized that I had some wood in my garage that might work. It is from an old coffee table. I wasn't sure what it was made of so I took it apart and cut a small corner off of it. Sure enough, it is a VERY hard wood. I thought it was going to burn up my saw! I was out there with an honest-to-Joerg rasp shaping this thing, my Dremel wouldn't do the job at all.
Here's the early result--

Not as pretty as the other one yet, but it will be. It took me forever to get to this point! Now I know the difference and will only work with genuine hardwood in the future. The whole feel while shooting is different. I guess it's a power transfer issue where even a little bit of flex will degrade the feel, or something.
The beauty of this design is that when you line up the bands while aiming the pouch flies through the same plane as the end of the fork between the hole and the groove at the top. No guesswork. Line it up, put target more or less "behind" the upper fork, release. Thwap!!
Bill should be selling every Hathcock he can make if they shoot this well (and I'm sure they shoot better)!
 

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aamj50, you could cut a slot across the grain, down to below your attachment point on the fork and glue in a tongue, say 1/8" thick, to keep the wood safe from cracking along the grain. This could be done easily before the fork is cut out. You could also drill and dowel across the grain for similar results before the fork is cut out. Just a thought.
 

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Yeah the Universal Fork design allows quite a bit of accuracy. Like you said, with chinese looped tubes the line up is super simple when side shooting. On mine though there is a little groove used for attaching bands for over the top shooting... that simple little groove is on top and in the center of your sight picture when side shooting... The only variable becomes elevation. Once you know your distances, then all you do is put the target you're shooting at in the groove and thwack!
 

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Good job!

The pine one can be stabilized by drilling a hole sideways through the fork and glueing in a threaded rod. Pine will always break along the fibre direction so once a single rod is in place, the slingshot is safe.

The rod can also be a solid round wooden rod or an old drill bit.

Use epoxy glue.

Jörg
 

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@ aamj50

This is a great innovative design in terms of band attachement
, .....really good input to me , thanks a lot for sharing
!

But I also have concerns about the eventual weakness of that particular timber , that you've used for the first one .

@ JoergS

I guess , that the one you've pointed out might not be the only weakpoint(though more leverage does occur there) , the wood might also break at the wood portion surrounded by the band loops at the tips of the fork ,....... especially when the slingshot is not held straight and uneven tension would occur .

greetz , Holzwurm
 
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