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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I´m an industrial designer, and I love new thech, and love CNC machines. I started making slingshots cut into plywood with a CNC router, the last one I made (The Nexus Stealth) was an aluminum one with a 3D printed palm swell.

Well, now I present to you my latest design, the Nexus 3, a fully 3D printed slingshot, made in red PLA, in a Creality CR-10 FDM 3D printer.

Is a pinch grip style frame, with a pinky hole for best grip. The forktips can be banded OTT / TTF and they have a center hole if you want to screw a gypsy tab. Also they have a little groove to make an aiming reference when shooting TTF.

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One concern that I had was if the slingshot could bear with the tension of the bandsets and of course, a direct impact on one of the forks, well, I did my tests, and here is the video ( I will add english subtitles later, but the auto translate seems to work quite fine)

 

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Nice frame and presentation! Looks like a great all rounder.

The pinch area looks like a good fit. Well rounded and a clean structure. The variable thickness also helps to keep it compact but give an ergonomic boost where it is required.

Looks simple, but details tell a story!

Thanks for sharing!

M
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nice frame and presentation! Looks like a great all rounder.

The pinch area looks like a good fit. Well rounded and a clean structure. The variable thickness also helps to keep it compact but give an ergonomic boost where it is required.

Looks simple, but details tell a story!

Thanks for sharing!

M
You have a sharp eye to unfold the story behind this slingshot!

Thanks for your comments Mark!
 

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Looks nice, however I would be concerned about using a 3d printed slingshot. I have done a lot of 3d printing over the years, and while the tech is really cool I would be concerned about the strength in this application. Layer separation could be a problem with the limbs. What are your thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Looks nice, however I would be concerned about using a 3d printed slingshot. I have done a lot of 3d printing over the years, and while the tech is really cool I would be concerned about the strength in this application. Layer separation could be a problem with the limbs. What are your thoughts?
I was concerned too, so I printed a few, changing the orientation of the layers, and made some tests, first I measured the pull of several band types, to see how much weight or force they actualy generate on the fork tips, the strongest ones generate 10 kilos (22 punds). Later I applyed pull to the forktips, using a digital scale I coul reach aprox 30 kilos (66 pounds) an did not break any forktip. Another test was shooting directly to the frames. All this tests are on the video. I have been shooting with one of this 3d printed slingshot for months without any issue, I´m using 0.75 Precise 1 cm straight cut, 17.5 cm active lenght, with 8 mm steels. As long as you dont hit the forks, (Because one hit would weaken the fork tip) You can use a 3D printed slingshot with no problem. I added a different set to another one, 0.75 Precise, 18 to 12 mm tappered cut, 20 cm active lenght, also shooting with no problem.

Cheers!
 

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I am curious why you printed the one in the video upright, when it looks like it may have been designed to print target side down, And that's what I would have thought to be strongest?
Is it stronger printed that way? I was just curious
 

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I use printed frames a lot. Mostly SLS or MJF prints. Some are over 5 years old. A frame hit is usually not a problem, direct tip hits are not so lucky, but even G10 feels a hit.
 
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I am curious why you printed the one in the video upright, when it looks like it may have been designed to print target side down, And that's what I would have thought to be strongest?
Is it stronger printed that way? I was just curious
I started printing as you mention, target side down, but because the design is curvy, it needed a little supports, and I didn´t like the finish of that side after removing supports. I tried with the vertical position, an it printed a lot better with little supports. I was triyng to achieve the best print aesthetically speaking.

As for tension, both prints hold enough load. If the strongest bandset delivers 22 punds of load, both prints reached 66 pounds without breaking, more than enough. The one printed target side down withstood more direct hits so yes, is the stronguest in that department.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I use printed frames a lot. Mostly SLS or MJF prints. Some are over 5 years old. A frame hit is usually not a problem, direct tip hits are not so lucky, but even G10 feels a hit.
SLS and MJF prints are a lot stronger than FDM, that is the one I have, I was a little skeptical about making a fully functional 3D printed slingshot, but after the results I got from my tests, I have been shooting my 3D printed desing with no problems.

As long as you print with 3 walls, and 70% infill, and don´t hit the forks, there should be no problem with a FDM print.
 

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Thanks for the great video! I have been printing small frames using PETG as the material and printing with the layers horizontal. along the length of the sling. So far they have been working out great. I have been thinking about trying some Glass reinforced nylon at some point if I decide to do larger slings on the printer. I see a lot of people using acrylic for slings, and honestly acrylic has a very brittle impact strength compared to PETG or Polycarbonate. So I personally feel its pretty viable, and as BAT shows, as long as you have layers going the correct direction, you are going to be pretty safe.
 
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