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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see a lot of frames with narrow Forks. For me anything under 80mm is pretty much useless because the POI becomes so far above the fork tip that I'm aiming at some vague point inches below the target (gangsta style OTT).
Why and how do folks shoot these narrow little frames?
 

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I have the same problem with one little fork. I'm short draw. I raised my anchor point from cheek to temple and then to the top of my ear. I felt like a shooting teapot. The position became a bit tiring/uncomfortable after some time but POA and POI came much closer if not 'on'. That's my 'How'. I don't shoot it very much - once a month or so - but I'm thinking that this little fork I bought will come in handy as I use it as the tool to extend my draw out of view and beyond my ear and past the back of my head. An anchor spot that I can shoot this little fork from in long draw and, importantly, in comfort and where POA and POI are the same, is somewhere in that area - that's the 'Why'.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, anchor point is the key.
I use a knuckle-in-the-cheekbone anchor - it's the most consistent one (for me anyway) but when shooting something like a Milbro "Traditional" I have to raise my hand so that my thumb knuckle is virtually touching my eyeball.
Which brings me back to why they make these things - do people like having to stick their thumbs in their eyes?
 

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I guess everyone has slightly different angles their body makes when they are drawing. Some people line up the bands much closer to the eye, as you mentioned.
I found I need a narrower fork gap for shorter draw - about 10mm wider for full butterfly...
I've also set-up narrower forks for long distance POI compensation.

However, I've wondered about this myself, especially for PFS style shooting. The point of impact is raised so high, the only way I can shoot those frames is using "instinctive" aiming.

I remember @Island made said he was shooting 100mm forks and he is now down to 80mm. Maybe he can explain how this changed for him through the years...
 

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I understand pinpoint accuracy when hunting is a given requirement and achieved with wider forks for most.
Narrow fork shooting, for me anyway, is just a different style or level to be achieved to keep things interesting when target shooting.
When shooting PFS gangster I use a high forktip grip and sight off my knuckle which in effect gives me a similar aimpoint, about 20mm higher.
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I guess everyone has slightly different angles their body makes when they are drawing. Some people line up the bands much closer to the eye, as you mentioned.
I found I need a narrower fork gap for shorter draw - about 10mm wider for full butterfly...
I've also set-up narrower forks for long distance POI compensation.

However, I've wondered about this myself, especially for PFS style shooting. The point of impact is raised so high, the only way I can shoot those frames is using "instinctive" aiming.

I remember @Island made said he was shooting 100mm forks and he is now down to 80mm. Maybe he can explain how this changed for him through the years...
Impressive observation that I’ve lowered my fork width! For 15 years I shot 100mm wide forks, the past 2 years that dropped to 95, to 90 to 85, now my sweet spot is 80 to 85, I can still be comfortable with 90 if I go full out butterfly.

I can’t really answer why my fork width got smaller….I’ve always shot long draw..and still do. 100 mm always put my fork tip on the target, now 85 puts my fork tip dead on target, and 80 I actually prefer because I don’t have to cover my target with the fork tip. Now when I shoot the top band rests on my cheek bone right below my eye, when I shot a wider frame the bands rested down lower on my face.
 

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As I've progressed through the hobby, shooting butterfly pfs ended up being my happy place. Fork widths of 60/65 seems to be my sweet spot. My reference point when drawing is the outer corner of my right eye. When shooting OPFS, NLSPFS or Tiny Turtle frames, that puts me pretty much dead on. Strangely, when shooting different style frames with the same fork size, I usually have to aim low. That's why I've decided to stick with those frames for 95% of my shooting. Also why I've placed an OPFS order with a certain Island dweller!
 

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Excellent question really.
Sometimes our "whys" can be only marginally understood.
One of the comments above about slowly settling into a "sweet spot" kinda rings true for me as well. Pretty sure there are a couple narrow fork frames down in the bottom of my box of frames that the bands have been removed and put on another (90mm wide) frame.
I do like the sound of your adjustable width Leatherman frame.......
Thank you! Just the excuse I need to go buy a Leatherman multi tool! Had my eye on one anyway. Thank you!
 

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For me one of the benefits is smaller frames and that helps because I tend to choke high up on the forks so the less width the better the grip and I have more control and more consistancy. I have recently decided that I want to work on accuracy and consistency and after a little bit of expiration I have found out that 85mm is pretty much perfect fork width, I shoot with a pouch twist in every style I shoot so my thumb is not in my eye. The first knuckle of my pointer finger rests right on the end of my cheek bone. This one of the better examples I have
 

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I see a lot of frames with narrow Forks. For me anything under 80mm is pretty much useless because the POI becomes so far above the fork tip that I'm aiming at some vague point inches below the target (gangsta style OTT).
Why and how do folks shoot these narrow little frames?
To me when I shoot full size frames my bands don't cover the entire fork tip so I have to aim off the top of the band instead of the corner of the fork when I shoot a smaller frame I'm able to aim right off the corner of the fork and it puts me on target
 

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As I've progressed through the hobby, shooting butterfly pfs ended up being my happy place. Fork widths of 60/65 seems to be my sweet spot. My reference point when drawing is the outer corner of my right eye. When shooting OPFS, NLSPFS or Tiny Turtle frames, that puts me pretty much dead on. Strangely, when shooting different style frames with the same fork size, I usually have to aim low. That's why I've decided to stick with those frames for 95% of my shooting. Also why I've placed an OPFS order with a certain Island dweller!
If that island dweller could get a free evening to get some anodizing done he would have had them to you weeks ago!
 

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I have the same problem with narrow forks in that I have to aim so low that I can't find a consistent aiming point at 7-10metersbecause there is nothing to reference. I know about raising the anchor point but I am trying to be consistent with that right now so I don't want to change it just yet. I have 5-6 narrow fork slingshots and usually take them out of town somewhere where I can shoot 15-25 meters. They work better for me for longer-distance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So it's not just me then.
I like the "Milbro Traditional" cast metal slingshot, they're now made in China and are a copy of the original - but the forks are so narrow you can't hit a damn thing because at 10 yards the POI is about 8" above the POA.
 

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I used to shoot 98mm fork gap, but after getting an awesome custom sling with an 80mm gap I switched. My Anchor is on the top of my cheek bone and I an dead on using the corner of my fork. I make my own and shoot adjustable tip slingshots so it's easy to dial my forks. I am now down to 74mm fork gap and it works great.
All what you get used to.

Cheers!
 

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So after reading through this thread I got curious about something. All of the folks sharing their personal journey started shooting around 100mm forks and are ‘now down to’……85mm etc. Why are the examples noted so similar? What if a person starts at 80mm and discovers their sweet spot at 100mm forks? What if they discover their sweet spot is 90mm but only really because they over-sanded their project frame? Who actually has the sweetest sweet spot??!😳🙈🙊🙉🤫🧐🤣
 
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