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This is one of my latest knives. It is a Tuff Lite by Cold Steel. There may be more with a blade like this but the marketing did it's job with the features and I decided to go with it. They can be found at a reasonable price if your google. I found walmart had the best price. I could avoid shipping if I wanted to pick it up "in store". It was not stocked in store.

I was intrigued by the straight blade. Namely, wondering if my thoughts on a straight blade as it is configured and combined with the handle design would provide more power through the whole stroke and full length of the blade. Like when shaving bark off a branch or any slicing or shaving. With my small tests it appears to provide a powerful cutting stroke and the secure control is dynamite.

You may enjoy the vid they have on Cold Steel web site in the Tuff lite Series section, about the tuff lite.

One thing to keep in mind with this knife is the side profile size, in the closed position. If you are real picky about how it sits in your pocket, or with the clip it comes fitted with. I like clips.

I like it. There is also a Mini with a 2 inch blade. This is the 2 1/2 Tuff Lite, making for 2inches of cutting edge.

Please comment, as I am new to knives and any knives features, pros or cons.

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Rule #14
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I have the serrated Tuff Lite, cold steel definitely knows how to advertise their knives ...

I wish they didn't have the jimping/traction/whatever grooves on the blade spine. I really hate those features on knives, it's useless IMO.
 

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Cogito Ergo Armatum Sum
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Those are interesting little knives, and probably really work well for tip work and anything involving draw cuts. The way that the blade is in front of the centerline of the handle and is angled to it as well probably provides a very strong cutting angle for soft materials or anything where the plane of the blade is perpendicular to the plane of the target. IE cutting a cardboard box open on the side.

In my experience that design is not well suited for jobs where the cut is at a shallow angle and the forces against the blade are unequal, as in whittling wood or stripping bark. while the handle may provide a secure grip, and the angle may develop lots of cutting force by keeping the cutting edge closer to perpendicular to the direction of the cut (ie not angling back and allowing it to "slip" past the material. the unequal lateral forces acting forward of the pivot point tend to make the blade want to twist to either side of the intended path of the cut. That's the trade off inherent in the design. If you want power and aggressive cutting you have to expend a lot of hand and wrist strength holding it straight, and any deviation is magnified. If you want control and a "forgiving" cut that allows for fine detail, look for a blade where the cutting edge is behind the balance line of the handle (like a flexcut carving knife)

Of course, YMMV
 

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WHO???
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i like almost all the cold steel products
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I wish they didn't have the jimping/traction/whatever grooves on the blade spine. I really hate those features on knives, it's useless IMO.
Not if done properly. It can provide much better grip and control.
Hrawk, check out the Follow Up; Byrd vs Cold Steel blade comparison I posted.
 
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