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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
"Beginning to try ott shooting, but 'seems to me that there is no exact frame reference - I need to be a bit low and left of the frame tip....... it seems that the Chineese frames w/sights have the aim point a little high and inside the tip... Am I missing something ? Are the top ott shooters simply shooting instinctively.

Thanks for any insight.........
 

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Depends on the frame. Some I use the tip of the fork, some the band groove, etc. Easiest way to figure it out is shoot a big paper or cardboard target with a dot in the middle. Pick a point to start with and adjust until hitting center and that's your reference point. Also works for elevation. Some I have to hold at bottom of target, some I hold middle of target. That will change when shooting at different distances, but that's where shooting experience takes over.
 

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I think fork gap width is the main culprit/consideration here (at least with vertical alignment). I shoot ott, and shooting at about 170fps I can generally hold a fork with a gap a little over 4” across (like my pocket predator ott ranger or Boy Scout) touching or just below the target from 10-15 meters or so. I’m always surprised how much lower I have to hold with a fork gap that is just a little smaller.
 

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Are you shooting fixed anchor or floating? Fork width also is a factor. If you can get left/right fairly consistent try small up/down adjustments in anchor point until you're hitting the mark. A clean release is also very important, as i'm sure you know.

For me, with an ear anchor point and forks that are 75-85mm outside width, a fork tip reference point puts me right on target.
 

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Windage - It sounds like your shots are going a bit to the left when aiming with the corner of the fork. This sometimes happens with low fork frames. One remedy is to bend your neck a bit and/or lean forward a little.This puts your eye on top of the ball and your bands will point straight at the target. Experiment by shooting straight up like a compound bow shooter and then try canting your neck a bit and maybe leaning a bit like a stickbow shooter.

Elevation - I use a variable anchor point to hit at different distances. I always use my thumb knuckle as an index pointer on my ear. For 10 yards I use the knuckle at the top of the tragus. For longer distances I drop down on the ear. Once I get to the lobe I will use the middle or bottom of the fork to get very long shots such as 50-75 yards. Narrow fork widths work well with this system. With a wide 4 1/4" fork I might have to use the ear lobe at 10 yards. The attachments show an idea of how this might work for you. Experimenting is interesting and fun. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for replies...'Think I've about got it- shooting a mini-tarus. Really like the small frame, but it just. takes some steel down range to get good @ ott having only shot ttf frames so far...…….Also found an old golf glove makes ott more comfortable in cold weather...g
 

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I ahve spent montha learnimg how not to aim. See it then hit it.

But all the same factors are still in play. I just don't have to think about them as much any more.

All very great information.

Thanks ere'body. Good question, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just shot this 60 shot group @ 10m. sighting down the bands. While this group wouldn't impress expert shooters, ' pretty pleased w/right/left consistency after only a couple days shooting this style (ott)……….Thinking maybe a few million Chinese shooters might be on to something...
 

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Holding the OTT slingshot sideways and the pouch anchored on the cheekbone, I aim via the top edge of the fork tip, which runs parallel to the upper side edge of the upper placed flat band. This yields consistent accuracy (see the attached image). Knowing which eye is dominant when aiming is crucial too. Holding your breath just before releasing the pouch increases stability.

So-called "instinctive shooting", without a steady contact anchor point on the side of the ear or on the cheekbone, is in any case much harder to master: significant practice is required for this technique - which does, however, come with the benefit of higher power linked to more "acceleration" time of the bands (or tubes).

A notch, or other reference marks (e-g. colored sticky tape, a dab of paint) at this position of the fork tip of slingshots without sights ensure a steady aiming reference too, but it always needs to be as close as possible to the upper edge of the bands.

The 10 yard fiber optic dot on the sights commonly seen on Chinese slingshots lies maybe 1 mm above the upper side edge of the flat bands: this very slight gap clearly impacts shot placement on the vertical level, as that initial gap increases over a given distance and affects the POI.

It needs to be compensated for by aiming very slightly above the target, also bearing in mind that the trajectory of the ammo is in any case never perfectly linear i.e. the POI drops off depending on ammo weight, initial thrust, and the distance involved.

It is for this reason that hunting bows have sights with fiber optic sight positions for various distances.
 

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I have the Taurus OTT also and use the top of the band as my aiming reference. It's a great frame but only for ammo smaller than 15mm from my experience. Otherwise I get lots of frame hits shooting larger ammo.
 

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Windage - It sounds like your shots are going a bit to the left when aiming with the corner of the fork. This sometimes happens with low fork frames. One remedy is to bend your neck a bit and/or lean forward a little.This puts your eye on top of the ball and your bands will point straight at the target. Experiment by shooting straight up like a compound bow shooter and then try canting your neck a bit and maybe leaning a bit like a stickbow shooter.

Elevation - I use a variable anchor point to hit at different distances. I always use my thumb knuckle as an index pointer on my ear. For 10 yards I use the knuckle at the top of the tragus. For longer distances I drop down on the ear. Once I get to the lobe I will use the middle or bottom of the fork to get very long shots such as 50-75 yards. Narrow fork widths work well with this system. With a wide 4 1/4" fork I might have to use the ear lobe at 10 yards. The attachments show an idea of how this might work for you. Experimenting is interesting and fun. Hope this helps.
Northerner nailed it with the picture of the tips and aiming points. I have a sling very similar to that and it's spot on. I use the flatness of the band to look down then start with the target in the upper corner and go from there.
I have found left or right flyers are me leaning my head over too much. I try to almost keep it straight now and that's helped a lot for me.

I have a harder time with TFF lol.

Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 
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