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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey gang.

I would like to make some palm swells for 2 slingshots I have in mind for some arthritic acquaintances. I've seen the finished result, but never really how they're added. I assume from pictures that you glue it/screw it on before you do much finishing? I was thinking of using some cedar plywood on the handle of these birch plywood shooters.

I would just try it out and guess, but these are two of the cleanest board cuts I've made, and I'd hate to ruin them...

-Bob
 

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Cut your basic frame out. Glue on a big block of whatever you want the palm swell made of. Start shaping.

Most people I assume would use a PVA wood glue or epoxy to glue it on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Keen. So it is how I thought... though I don't imagine mine will look as nice as some of yours =)

-Bob
 

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Patience grasshopper. Don't try and remove too much material too quick. You can cut off, but you cant cut on!

Just remember, clamp it up nice and tight, but not too tight you squeeze all the glue out.
 

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Christ this is hard to sand... I don't have any power tools that help with shaping, and the only files I have are kind of fine. Using 60 grit sand paper to try to round these after chiseling the "slope" toward the forks.... ><

-Bob
 

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Dremel-type tool makes process go soooo much quicker. 'Course such a tool can make things go toooo quick too.
 

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if you have a harbor Freight store around you go check out there belt sanders, they have them for pretty cheap, i picked one up for sanding and shaping my SS's works very well for the price $25-30 or so.
 

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Christ this is hard to sand... I don't have any power tools that help with shaping, and the only files I have are kind of fine. Using 60 grit sand paper to try to round these after chiseling the "slope" toward the forks.... ><

-Bob
i know the feeling i am on my second one now, all by hand its fun but time consuming lus its hard on the hands. in the end you get the satisfaction of saying you did it all yourself. thats cool, but after a few of these i think i will buy a dremmel tool myself lol!
 

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I think I too may have to try some palm swells soon. I find a good rasp(or set of rasps) makes all the difference. I did my first slingshot with just a 4 in 1 rasp. After that I went and bought a 3 piece rasp set with chisel tips. The set was $10 at harbor frieght, but after trying my buddies set he got for $20 at lowes, I was wishing that I wasn't such a cheap A##. The different sizes are nice at times but the 4 in 1 is still the most useful, the chisels tips rarely get used and they lack the less course sections of the 4 in1. I figure its best to get all the shaping done with the rasps since I don't have any type of power sander. So the sanding for me is just smoothing everything out, and getting any rasp marks out.
 

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Dremel-type tool makes process go soooo much quicker. 'Course such a tool can make things go toooo quick too.
I saw this and immediately remembered that my wife had purchased one when we were making favours for our wedding. I had no idea where it was (we've moved since then) but decided to take a head first dive into the junk in the garage.

I. Found. The. Dremel.

Haven't worked on my palm swells with it yet, just tryin to get the hang of it. I had a very poor boardcut of a Patriot. It was all slanted due to the jigsaw blade bending and whatnot. I have since eliminated that problem, but I was left with a junk ugly boardcut. I decided to try to use the Dremel to fix it and boy did it do a lot of work. Made it the most ergonomic of all my slingshots too!

The back
Finger Wood Creative arts Tool Art

Front with neat looking ergo grooves.
Glasses Hand Vision care Sunglasses Cloud

MAN-GRIP!
Finger Wood Computer keyboard Gesture Tableware

This took like 20 minutes. Another 20 with some finer sand paper and I think it'll be ready for a linseed bath. I can't believe I didn't look for the Dremel sooner. Of course, that much fine saw dust was a problem, but I put on my mask and a fan. It's really something. Now if only I knew how to make good band grooves ><

-Bob
 

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A chainsaw file works great for making band grooves as they are straight, not tapered.

Clamp a straight piece of wood below where you want the fork grooves to be and use this as a guide for the file.

Hard to beat a router though. You can get a router attachment for your Dremel, just remember to use a guide, freehand routing it pretty tricky when you are trying to keep a straight line.
 

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OK Bob. If your laminating timber to timber I'd go for a two part epoxy. The slow curing type not the 5min stuff. Rough shape out your handle slabs leaving plenty of overhang. Make sure the parts to be mated are dead flat but not necessarily to smooth. A few sanding marks will help glue to 'key'. You can even drill a bunch of small holes into but not through the pieces your laminating. these will fill with glue (make sure there are no air bubles in the holes. I sometimes use a pin to poke them out) to create internal 'rivets' if you need extra strength. Prepare everything and the area your going to work at then mix the epoxy, glue and clamp. leave for a day or two and get to shaping. A word on the use of dremmel. The best dremmel tool for shaping is the carbide sculpting bit and the little drum sanders in two sizes and with two grades of paper. Rough shape with the carbide bit, final shape with the rough grade drum bit then go over with the smoother drum. A very light touch is whats called for when using a dremmel, especially at 30+ thou rpm. Let the tool do it's work rather than forcing it. you can burn the lil buggers out or damage your job otherwise. Like Hrawk said you can always take more off but putting it back aint easy! Practice on ply befor you try a nice piece of timber because you will learn how the tool behaves when carving or sanding at different angles etc.
Best of luck mate. Hope this helps and looking forward to seeing the results.
 
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