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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Some answers regarding peak performance during practice, in a recent thread got me thinking.
I am always shooting my best right when I start a practice session. First shot is usually a hit. Heck, if I wanted to make a video of me cutting a card, I would make it in the beginning of my shooting.
I've noticed that as the shot count goes up, after a certain point, I start to miss more often, then I start to overthink how I hold the pouch, the frame, how I aim etc, but accuracy still deteriorates.
I am trying very hard for some time now, to get rid of this stage of my shooting sessions, but Tremoside's post got me thinking. Is this a normal phenomenon?
I find it hard to accept, my aim is to shoot the same % of accuracy under all conditions, and this is the basis of all my practice. But now I am somewhat confused. Have I gotten it all wrong? I am definitely improving, I even have a 16mm target hang up in my catch box, something I wouldn't even consider before, but these inconsistencies or deterioration of accuracy after prolonged shooting, really gets on my nerves. I know that the way I approach slingshot shooting is not helping, as I am probably asking too much of myself, but if what I experience for so long is normal, I will get some ease of mind.
Now, IF it is normal, how do we alleviate this issue once and for all?
 

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Yes, it's normal and I see it in other skill based activities like pool and video games.

There's the overthinking and there's fatigue - mental and physical. Muscles tense up and pump up from continued gripping of the frame, holding firm and pulling the bands which leads to a slight loss of fine motor control and sensory feedback. Your eyes get tired and ability to focus is diminished. It only takes a tiny degradation in each of those aspects to go from a just hit to a just miss.

A bit like the trajectory of our ammo is a curved path with a high point, not a straight line, the trajectory of our performance through a shooting session is also a curve with a high point. It's useful to be conscious of that and to identify where and when changes occur. Something an engineering professor once told me "if you can't measure it, you can't control it". Measure and log your performance curve through each shooting session and note what you think is contributing to the decay - focus, vision, muscle control etc. Answers will emerge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, it's normal and I see it in other skill based activities like pool and video games.

There's the overthinking and there's fatigue - mental and physical. Muscles tense up and pump up from continued gripping of the frame, holding firm and pulling the bands which leads to a slight loss of fine motor control and sensory feedback. Your eyes get tired and ability to focus is diminished. It only takes a tiny degradation in each of those aspects to go from a just hit to a just miss.

A bit like the trajectory of our ammo is a curved path with a high point, not a straight line, the trajectory of our performance through a shooting session is also a curve with a high point. It's useful to be conscious of that and to identify where and when changes occur. Something an engineering professor once told me "if you can't measure it, you can't control it". Measure and log your performance curve through each shooting session and note what you think is contributing to the decay - focus, vision, muscle control etc. Answers will emerge.
If what you said is correct, and it most definitely is, because I notice it in my shooting, then I think that we should never shoot when the decline comes along because then we are practicing wrong form... Would that be a good approach?
Are the top shooters suffering from the same decline in accuracy, I wonder.
 

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There's truth to that idea of not practicing in the decline. Another saying I've seen here - "perfect practice makes perfect".

There's no point in reinforcing the things that don't work. There is however a point in monitoring the decline so that you can measure it, learn from it and eventually control it. The trick is to know when you've reached that point where it's time to change what you're trying to achieve or observe and again when it's time to stop.
 

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Some answers regarding peak performance during practice, in a recent thread got me thinking.
I am always shooting my best right when I start a practice session. First shot is usually a hit. Heck, if I wanted to make a video of me cutting a card, I would make it in the beginning of my shooting.
I've noticed that as the shot count goes up, after a certain point, I start to miss more often, then I start to overthink how I hold the pouch, the frame, how I aim etc, but accuracy still deteriorates.
I am trying very hard for some time now, to get rid of this stage of my shooting sessions, but Tremoside's post got me thinking. Is this a normal phenomenon?
I find it hard to accept, my aim is to shoot the same % of accuracy under all conditions, and this is the basis of all my practice. But now I am somewhat confused. Have I gotten it all wrong? I am definitely improving, I even have a 16mm target hang up in my catch box, something I wouldn't even consider before, but these inconsistencies or deterioration of accuracy after prolonged shooting, really gets on my nerves. I know that the way I approach slingshot shooting is not helping, as I am probably asking too much of myself, but if what I experience for so long is normal, I will get some ease of mind.
Now, IF it is normal, how do we alleviate this issue once and for all?
Definitely normal, I just call it shooter fatigue. Happens with every kind of shooting, especially any with repetetive, agressive or instictive movements. Now you see why I use the handle cold shot slingshots, that first shot being a good clean one without warming up. The only thing Ive found helps is to preestablish everything about the shot. Once you start no matter what happens stick to your form. As you said youre probably being too hard on yourself, have fun and dont sweat it. :)

Sent using two thumbs and Tapatalk.
 

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I actually did a bit of visualization practice before the last MWST in 2016. Every night before I drifted off to sleep I would think about the Spanish target event and play it out in my head. The order I would shoot, the sight picture, everything.
When the event actually happened I felt much more relaxed and better prepared, even though my actual physical practice had been pretty lacking due to shoulder surgery that January. I won the event and placed second overall in the tournament.
Maybe I should have spent some time visualizing the 20m round, too...
 

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Good thoughts, JR. Ash laid down the perfect-perfect cliche two posts above yours. The free throw studies have been duplicated many times - one group does nothing, one group shoots, one group imagines ... for 30 days. The do nothing group shows no gain, the imagining group comes in close behind the the actual shooting group in improvement. I recommended mind shooting to Skropi about 10 days ago.

We usually get into this bc guys like shooting things - it's part of our projecting male nature. (Referencing the forces behind the forms - the female energy is generally accepting, enveloping, and nurturing). Some of us are naturally uber competitive and start obsessing about 'peak performance' and 'maximum accuracy' but that's where I depart, prolly bc I'm old. Win some, lose some applies here for me, but stressing over misses is what's not fun.

Skropi states - my aim is to shoot the same % of accuracy under all conditions, and this is the basis of all my practice. If that 'absolute' is what motivates you, more power to you, but good grief, you're not a robot. Many factors like biorhythms, mood swings, astrology, dynamic life itself, can weigh in and count for a lot. We can be so obsessive that it's no longer fun and shooting becomes a grim competition with ourselves. What's the payoff - if you can shoot the nuts off a fly 95% of the time, will you then be content? If so, have at it. Different strokes - I'm only in it for fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good thoughts, JR. Ash laid down the perfect-perfect cliche two posts above yours. The free throw studies have been duplicated many times - one group does nothing, one group shoots, one group imagines ... for 30 days. The do nothing group shows no gain, the imagining group comes in close behind the the actual shooting group in improvement. I recommended mind shooting to Skropi about 10 days ago.

We usually get into this bc guys like shooting things - it's part of our projecting male nature. (Referencing the forces behind the forms - the female energy is generally accepting, enveloping, and nurturing). Some of us are naturally uber competitive and start obsessing about 'peak performance' and 'maximum accuracy' but that's where I depart, prolly bc I'm old. Win some, lose some applies here for me, but stressing over misses is what's not fun.

Skropi states - my aim is to shoot the same % of accuracy under all conditions, and this is the basis of all my practice. If that 'absolute' is what motivates you, more power to you, but good grief, you're not a robot. Many factors like biorhythms, mood swings, astrology, dynamic life itself, can weigh in and count for a lot. We can be so obsessive that it's no longer fun and shooting becomes a grim competition with ourselves. What's the payoff - if you can shoot the nuts off a fly 95% of the time, will you then be content? If so, have at it. Different strokes - I'm only in it for fun.
To tell you the truth, 9/10 on a 3cm target would be enough for me, but I dont see that happening anytime soon. I do have fun though, all this procedure, searching, and trainning against myself is very fun for me! Reminds me of my track games trainning years :)
 

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Prince of Paraprosdokians and Epistemophilia
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Some answers regarding peak performance during practice, in a recent thread got me thinking.
I am always shooting my best right when I start a practice session. First shot is usually a hit. Heck, if I wanted to make a video of me cutting a card, I would make it in the beginning of my shooting.
I've noticed that as the shot count goes up, after a certain point, I start to miss more often, then I start to overthink how I hold the pouch, the frame, how I aim etc, but accuracy still deteriorates.
I am trying very hard for some time now, to get rid of this stage of my shooting sessions, but Tremoside's post got me thinking. Is this a normal phenomenon?
I find it hard to accept, my aim is to shoot the same % of accuracy under all conditions, and this is the basis of all my practice. But now I am somewhat confused. Have I gotten it all wrong? I am definitely improving, I even have a 16mm target hang up in my catch box, something I wouldn't even consider before, but these inconsistencies or deterioration of accuracy after prolonged shooting, really gets on my nerves. I know that the way I approach slingshot shooting is not helping, as I am probably asking too much of myself, but if what I experience for so long is normal, I will get some ease of mind.
Now, IF it is normal, how do we alleviate this issue once and for all?
Sounds like you're overstressing yourself, causing quick fatigue, with the inevitable results.

Relax and enjoy - Greece wasn't built in a day.

Or was that Rome?
 
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Prince of Paraprosdokians and Epistemophilia
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Good thoughts, JR. Ash laid down the perfect-perfect cliche two posts above yours. The free throw studies have been duplicated many times - one group does nothing, one group shoots, one group imagines ... for 30 days. The do nothing group shows no gain, the imagining group comes in close behind the the actual shooting group in improvement. I recommended mind shooting to Skropi about 10 days ago.

We usually get into this bc guys like shooting things - it's part of our projecting male nature. (Referencing the forces behind the forms - the female energy is generally accepting, enveloping, and nurturing). Some of us are naturally uber competitive and start obsessing about 'peak performance' and 'maximum accuracy' but that's where I depart, prolly bc I'm old. Win some, lose some applies here for me, but stressing over misses is what's not fun.

Skropi states - my aim is to shoot the same % of accuracy under all conditions, and this is the basis of all my practice. If that 'absolute' is what motivates you, more power to you, but good grief, you're not a robot. Many factors like biorhythms, mood swings, astrology, dynamic life itself, can weigh in and count for a lot. We can be so obsessive that it's no longer fun and shooting becomes a grim competition with ourselves. What's the payoff - if you can shoot the nuts off a fly 95% of the time, will you then be content? If so, have at it. Different strokes - I'm only in it for fun.
"Mind shooting?" Well, I know we're not supposed to shoot a mime (although he/she wouldn't squeal), but "mind shooting?" Holy grey matter Batman!
 

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Prince of Paraprosdokians and Epistemophilia
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Good thoughts, JR. Ash laid down the perfect-perfect cliche two posts above yours. The free throw studies have been duplicated many times - one group does nothing, one group shoots, one group imagines ... for 30 days. The do nothing group shows no gain, the imagining group comes in close behind the the actual shooting group in improvement. I recommended mind shooting to Skropi about 10 days ago.

We usually get into this bc guys like shooting things - it's part of our projecting male nature. (Referencing the forces behind the forms - the female energy is generally accepting, enveloping, and nurturing). Some of us are naturally uber competitive and start obsessing about 'peak performance' and 'maximum accuracy' but that's where I depart, prolly bc I'm old. Win some, lose some applies here for me, but stressing over misses is what's not fun.

Skropi states - my aim is to shoot the same % of accuracy under all conditions, and this is the basis of all my practice. If that 'absolute' is what motivates you, more power to you, but good grief, you're not a robot. Many factors like biorhythms, mood swings, astrology, dynamic life itself, can weigh in and count for a lot. We can be so obsessive that it's no longer fun and shooting becomes a grim competition with ourselves. What's the payoff - if you can shoot the nuts off a fly 95% of the time, will you then be content? If so, have at it. Different strokes - I'm only in it for fun.
But what if it's a female fly????????
 

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Also I spend a serious anount of time goig through the process of shooting mentally. When I hunted wih my .22 gas pistol I dry fired a couple hundred shots a day as well. Too bad dry firing bands murders them lol. I still sometimes draw them and imagine the release, the gently relax my draw.

Sent using two thumbs and Tapatalk.
 

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If I notice my shooting starts to go south from extended shooting, I land a good shot and take a break. This doesn't happen much with my limited time and light setups, but getting annoyed and ending with poor accuracy and a bad headspace is no good. Slingshots are a way of relieving stress for me and if my hobby stresses me out then it's time to give it a rest and come back later.
 
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