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Precise Yellow - Cold Test

This sort of testing may not be useful to those stretching rubber in Nevada or Texas but it might interest those living in the northern States or Canada or the colder European countries. Ideally, I would have done the cold testing outdoors during the winter months but unfortunately these months have few days with bright enough sunlight. It always seems to be dim and cloudy during the winter and my old chronograph doesn't function well under those conditions.

The warm testing was done indoors at room temperature and with controlled lighting. There was no direct sunlight or clouds to influence the readings. The cool testing was done by placing the slingshot in the fridge for an hour and then testing within 30 seconds of removing. The cold testing was done using a chest freezer to bring down the band temperature. Test shots were taken approx 30 seconds after removing from the freezer. The frame and bands were dripping in condensation after the cold stage of testing. I may try the cold test again when outdoor temps drop down to -25C to -30C but I'll be rushing inside with the frozen bands to test the speed. It's all about curiosity.

Bands = Precise Yellow

Band Cut = 13/16" x 5/8" x 7 1/8" working length

Draw Length = 32"

Ammo = 5/16" steel

Room temperature at 68F (20C)

Test 1 - 232, 233, 235, 235, 234 fps

Test 2 - 234, 233, 232, 235, 233 fps

Test 3 - 236, 233, 234, 234, 232 fps

Fridge temperature at 37F (3C)

Test 1 - 235, 232, 233, 234, 236 fps

Test 2 - 233, 232, 234, 231, 234 fps

Test 3 - 233, 234, 235, 234, 236 fps

Freezer temperature at -1F (-18C)

Test 1 - 229, 236, 232, 234, 234 fps

Test 2 - 231, 231, 231, 234, 232 fps

Test 3 - 230, 232, 234, 232, 235 fps

Conclusions

The .55 mm Precise Yellow bands performed very well with moderate drops in temperature. Latex warms up after shooting a few shots so the best comparison would be to focus on the first shots in each test series. The average speed (first shots) at room temperature was 234 fps and almost identical to the average (first shots) fridge temperature speed. The average freezer temperature speed was only 4 fps slower. A more extreme temperature range would make the testing a bit more interesting but it was not within my ability, for now.

All shooting was done freehand so I cannot guaranty the exact same draw length to 1/8" or ¼" for every shot. I did my best to duplicate my draw each time. Even if there were small deviations, the results still show a very small drop in speed on the first shot after the bands were in a freezer for an hour or more. If the bands were temperature sensitive then the first shots with cool and cold bands would be a lot lower than they were.

My method for reducing temperature is far from ideal. I'm sure that there is some warming of the bands during the 30 seconds before the first shot but the test still has some meaning. In the past I tried other bands with the freezer treatment and some felt like they were shearing apart for the first few shots. The Precise felt the same with all three tested temperatures.

I'm quite curious about the "anti-cold" version of the Precise bands. Here is what DanKung has to say about them.

"Anti-cold ONLY works well when temperature is below 50 Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius). In higher temperature than 50 Fahrenheit, the performance of Anti-cold is Not as good as normal Precise band. PRECISE released professional Anti-cold band on November 11, 2017. Please note ALL PRECISE bands shoot nice in cold weather, which means you can use any PRECISE bands in winter. The difference between PRECISE professional Anti-cold band and other PRECISE band is PRECISE professional Anti-cold band is born for shooting in cold weather, the cold weather has almost zero effect on its performance. To sum up, PRECISE Anti-cold slingshot band has obvious better performance than other PRECISE slingshot band in cold weather."
 

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Wow young blood, just wow. That was extremely thorough well written and thought out! Very clear and concise, used tables to show your findings, talked spread and variables - just pro methodology.

Very very well done man this is awesome!

*Bookmarked* :)

Sent using two thumbs and Tapatalk.
 

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Thanks for the information Northerner. This is helpful stuff. I ordered my first Precise latex a few days ago. I have been very curious about how it would be in the cooler temps that are rapidly approaching. Was hoping to be able to extend my outdoor shooting as long as possible. Glad I bought it now.
 

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Ray Rowden
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Wow!

I'm looking at high and low measurement of 236 and 229 over 45 readings.

If I could manage that with one temperature I'd be pretty pleased with my consistency!

You gave that latex a pretty good workout, and I'd say you both passed with flying colors!

I may have to alter my normal cold weather routine of shooting tubes and keeping them in my pocket until I'm ready to take a shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow!

I'm looking at high and low measurement of 236 and 229 over 45 readings.

If I could manage that with one temperature I'd be pretty pleased with my consistency!

You gave that latex a pretty good workout, and I'd say you both passed with flying colors!

I may have to alter my normal cold weather routine of shooting tubes and keeping them in my pocket until I'm ready to take a shot.
It doesn't happen often but I'm always shocked when I get 3 shots in a row with the same speed. If I do enough testing I get quite a few of pairs that are the same. I'm always amazed at the shot-to-shot velocity consistency with good rubber. Too bad that didn't equate to top accuracy. Lots of variables.

With the set-up above I can get 240 fps (or maybe slightly more) with the 5/16 steel if I do a pull-through shot or try for a heavy chest expansion for slightly more draw length. A bit of a short draw will drop it down to 225-227 fps. If I'm not tired out, focusing on a solid anchor point and the same expansion usually gets me into a 5 fps shot span for 5 shots.

I'm guessing that a butterfly shooting style would be much more challenging for consistency. I tried it again a few days ago and zinged my cheek several times before giving up, again. I barely let the bands kiss my cheek at full draw but always seem to get that little sting after the shot.
 

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Registered
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Wow young blood, just wow. That was extremely thorough well written and thought out! Very clear and concise, used tables to show your findings, talked spread and variables - just pro methodology.

Very very well done man this is awesome!

*Bookmarked* :)

Sent using two thumbs and Tapatalk.
Wow, I got to stop posting when I'm so tired. I said young blood thinking I was talking to the Norseman LOL. Silly me!

Sent using two thumbs and Tapatalk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Precise Yellow - Cold Test - Part 2

The numbers for my original Cold Test were correct but the testing method has weakness. It seems that latex warms up a lot faster than I assumed. The time it took to walk across a small room and start shooting was enough for the bands to warm and give readings that do not correspond to outdoor shooting in a true cool or cold ambient temperature.

This afternoon the outdoor temp dropped to 42F (5C) with no rain or snow coming down so I brought out my Chrony for more testing. My outdoor test area was shaded and the sensors had no problem getting readings that seemed to be quite consistent. We can call this the cool test and it's about as cool as I am willing to try. My bare hands were feeling the discomfort after a while so I went inside many times to warm up.

After the above testing I brought everything indoors and tested again after a couple of hours. The warm numbers were very close to what I had in prior testing.

Bands = Precise Yellow

Band Cut = 13/16" x 5/8" x 7 1/4" working length

Draw Length = 32"

Draw Weight = 9 lb, 6 oz

Ammo = 5/16" steel

Room temperature at 70F (21C)

Test 1 - 230, 228, 231, 230, 232 fps

Test 2 - 232, 231, 232, 230, 229 fps

Test 3 - 232, 233, 233, 232, 230 fps

Overall average = 231 fps

Outdoor temperature at 42F (approx 5C)

Test 1 - 221, 217, 219, 221, 219 fps

Test 2 - 221, 217, 218, 219, 222 fps

Test 3 - 219, 221, 218, 218, 219 fps

Overall average = 219 fps

Out of curiosity I brought out another frame that had .030" latex that I had bought from TexShooter a while back. These bands are old but still shoot fine. I have one more sheet of this stuff left so I might do further testing at some other time.

Bands = .030" latex

Band Cut = 7/8" straight cut x 7 ½" working length

Draw Length = 32"

Draw Weight = 10 lb, 7 oz

Ammo = 5/16" steel

Room temperature at 70F (21C)

Test 1 - 203, 202, 203, 201, 201 fps

Test 2 - 201, 203, 201, 200, 202 fps

Test 3 - 200, 202, 199, 200, 204 fps

Overall average = 201 fps

Outdoor temperature at 42F (5C)

Test 1 - 191, 191, 192, 195, 193 fps

Test 2 - 191, 191, 192, 190, 192 fps

Test 3 - 194, 192, 193, 192, 192 fps

Overall average = 192 fps

Conclusions

The .55 mm Precise Yellow bands performed great at room temperature and still fine at only 42F (approx 5C). A 12 fps drop is just over a 5% loss in speed. This is about what I was expecting to see for this band and would justify testing the Anti-Cold version for cool temperature shooting.

The .030" latex was an older band set that I had and it has likely lost some power over time. Even so, the amber latex did well with the cool temp testing. Velocity drop was only 9 fps which computes to approx 4 ½%.

The Precise Yellow is a more efficient band than this .030" latex, as shown by the speed compared to draw weight. In fairness it would be best to compare a fresh set of tapered .030" latex rather than the heavy 7/8" straight cut.
 
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