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So I just bought some Padauk and Zebrawood, and am planning to make a laminate of the two with either a poplar or paduak palm swell. Previously, I had made a few padauk/curly maple laminates, which did not turn out how I expected them to - the padauk had bled its color onto the curly maple, creating a red tinge on the maple. It's not attractive, and I'd rather it not happen again. I'd like to know what you guys do to prevent this, or if you just need to use certain woods in conjunction rather than others. I believe it's an oily vs. dry wood deal, but I'm not sure. Thanks!

Edit: 5,000th General Discussion Post :DDDDDD
Edit #2: Clarification - this is NOT from gluing the woods together, but from sanding them. Sawdust from one wood bleeds onto the other. Sorry I didn't post that earlier, might have caused some confusion.
 

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Use an epoxy based glue? Maybe resourcinol glue?
 

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i haven't had that happen (yet), but do find after about a week the padauk swells and creates a lip on what was a glass like surface.

have been shown a treatment that stops the pores from doing this, maybe it will work for your issues too. as soon as i have/tested some will let you know
 

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Wipe it with rubbing alcohol , then a light coat of super glue , I have friends who build custom guitars and this is what they do . MM
sounds easier said than done to get it neat but good tip!
 

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OOOOOH, ok, I've had that problem with my kiawe/walnut/koa ss. you gotta sand with the grain and slap your paper clean every few minutes. it also helps to sand from the lighter wood down onto the darker wood if possible. it just takes longer.
 

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i had this problem to, i use both a vacuum and micro fiber towel, every few minutes. and this might sound weird but a also have occasion to rinse under water. i find that if i make the wood just damp there is less dust, it raises the grain making it easier to sand, and the water when done (not often) rinses away stray particles.
 

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Thanks for the advice newconvert and pop shot did just that minus the watering down part and my new laminate came out great! Even the curly maple palm swell ended up free from coloring. The vacuum was definitely the most important-it cleaned off the sawdust from the sandpaper and the wood well.
 

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Thanks for the advice newconvert and pop shot did just that minus the watering down part and my new laminate came out great! Even the curly maple palm swell ended up free from coloring. The vacuum was definitely the most important-it cleaned off the sawdust from the sandpaper and the wood well.
you are welcome, the reason i do the water, in the earlier grits is because it help the woog grain to swell, so when you sand it kinda tree tops the grain and the wood dist is wet and kinda falls off, or better said rinses off, in the finer grits the vacuum and micro fiber towels get the nasty pieces that like to stick between the grain, or? canned air. compressor?
 
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