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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, ready to try the boardcut challenge, but notice there are several different cuts for boards. Mainly I see quarter sawn lumber and then regular sawn. Is there a preference as how the board is sawn? Whis is the safest cut?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Quarter sawn is always better. Much straighter grain. It will cost you more though, as manufacturers can't get as much usable wood out compared to a regular cut.
 

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The main difference I see is in appearence. Quartersawn lumber almost always gives a more pleasing grain presentation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. I appreciate your help.
 

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quarter sawn does not mean straighter grain. Attached are some drawings i did for a writing project. Each of these cuts gives a different effect from the wood, especially in Oak since oak has rays that show up differently depending on how you cut it. Appearance aside, the only thing that matters structurally for slingshot is that the grain is vertical.
 

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I guess my dad had them confused when he told me that. Sorry for the misinformation!
 

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google<real life experience
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Gopher, been practicing on soft pine and am ready to try some of the oak you were talking about. I tried a peice of burl wood found at work from an old skid, cut it our and applied a little pressure on on of the prongs and it snapped. Nice wood but not for a slingshot.
Pop Shot, nice catch. What kind of fish is that?
 

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It's an 'Ono. They're also called wahoo
 

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burl wood can be beautiful but is best left as scales on handles or accents...it is unpredictable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Burl seems to have grain going everywhere. No strength at all. Thought the hardness of the wood would be suffice. Thank goodness it snapped when it did. I notice a lot of members use different thicknesses for their slingshots. Is 3/4 inch the standard for boardcut. I notice 3/4" thru 1 1/4" thickness in the oak quarter sawn. What is the preference among shooters?

Thanks in advance. g
 

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I think the preferance is because all lumber sold at places like home depot, lowes, menards, etc is 1" thick nominal which is 3/4" actual thickness. when you go to an actual lumber yard you start finding your wood in "quarter" thicknesses. 6/4 is 1.5" thick. but 3/4" actual thickness is the most common among everyday users.
 

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Burl seems to have grain going everywhere. No strength at all. Thought the hardness of the wood would be suffice. Thank goodness it snapped when it did. I notice a lot of members use different thicknesses for their slingshots. Is 3/4 inch the standard for boardcut. I notice 3/4" thru 1 1/4" thickness in the oak quarter sawn. What is the preference among shooters?

Thanks in advance. g
Gopher is absolutely right, thickness is determined by availability. but i am a safety sally, so i always laminate 2 3/4' pieces together, i know in the harder woods depending on application, fork height, grain type....................... different thickness can be used, but i have seen to many failures on built structures where they should have been overly strong, after many injuries i have just decided to be safe rather than sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So depending on grain and fork height, 4/4 or 1" would be a good starting point and 1.5" would basically be very safe for a board cut. The idea of gluing the two 3/4" boards together means you can cross the grains for a better build? You guys are great. Thanks to all for your help.

IHS
g
 

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In a 3/4 vs 1 inch thick deal, it's mostly about preference. However, to be safe, on any non-laminate or non-plywood board cut, I would stick to 1 inch thick. 3/4 just seems a little thin. I've tried 5/4, but I feel it's a little thick. 3/4 inch plywood is great though. If you really care about the safety aspect, I would stick to a laminate or plywood because it's much stronger than a single wood board cut. The only time you'll see major breakages is usually in the even of a serious fork hit.
 

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i love the thicker board cuts, just because it gives you room to be creative, finger grooves, palm swells, cant the forks, when i do have even a small questin about board/fork strength i just pinn the weak area, how much more can you get? wood reinforced with metal.
 
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