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Missing Barns and Telling Yarns
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I asked a variation of this question last Winter, but I wanted to try and get some more specific feedback. I've got an aluminum core that I'd like to put some wooden scales on. I had heard using pins plus epoxy was the way to go. Problem is, I don't have a drill press. Nor have I ever used pins for anything. So I've got a couple questions for all you seasoned builders out there to help a rookie out...

What type of epoxy should I use? I've never bought one (always used superglue or woodglue in the past for odd jobs). I'm hoping to get all my supplies at Home Depot.

How does one go about placing pins? I've seen the metal rods for sale. Do you buy a size rod (say 1/16") then drill a hole that size and drive the rod into it? Should I add any epoxy to the rod when placing it?

I've got a pretty solid drill, but no drill press. Will it be a total trainwreck if I try to do the holes by hand?

Lastly, does anyone have a wood suggestion? I know aluminum dust can get into the grain, so I'll be polishing the edge of the frame beforehand to limit the dust I'll be producing, and I'm hoping to use something with a relatively tighter grain (not oak). I appreciate any suggestions or tips you fine people may be able to offer. Should I get it done this Summer, I'll be sure to post pics (unless it looks horrendous, at which point I'll just steal something of the second page of Google Images :D)
 

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I can not get epoxy where I live at an affordable price so I use super glue, which is here also known as "Chinese glue" and I apply evenly it using a rubber glove.

Before applying the glue I use a sharp piece of hard steel - it can be anything - to scratch the surfaces, both on wood and on aluminum core (especially there) because aluminum is always tricky to glue and in this way you make the surface larger.

I drill holes with hand drill using 3 mm drill.

I buy brass rods of 3 mm and a meter of two in length and I cut them slightly longer than needed so that I can sand them to the level of the wood.

In order to fit the pins perfectly I either have to rasp through the holes with the tiny narrow rasp or to sand off the rods (they should not be not too tight because I had wood scales break). But they shouldn't be too loose either.

Before inserting them I apply some super glue both to them and into the hole.

cheers,

jazz
 

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Having built knives in the past,I would use Devcon two part epoxy.Be sure to rough up both surfaces you intend to mate with sandpaper then,clean with acetone or alcohol.I have had success with gluing the slabs together,let it cure overnight then,drill the holes the same size as the pins(brass or stainless steel just about any thing will work).I made plenty of knives before I had a drill press take care to be parallel with the surface.Be sure to leave the pins a little long and file down later.Also clamp tightly while gluing.Rough up the pins and apply epoxy before insertion.One more thing,place the glued frame on something you don't mind drilling into so when the bit passes though the other side it doesn't splinter the surface.
 

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Grandpa Pete
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The best Epoxy I have found is the type used to glue the metal heads on golf clubs. I get it from a gold supply company. It is really tough. Imagine the beating it takes at the end of a golf club. I have also had good luck with J.B. Weld two part glues. I would suggest that you rough up the aluminum before you apply any epoxy. Ace Hardware sells brass rods that work well for pinning.

GP
 

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I have for some time made knife handles...Wood to aluminum is a bit trickier. I recommend T-88 slow cure epoxy. It can be found on Amazon and gives time to work & slow cure is stronger...which is necessary for aluminum (in my experience).

I also think you can use a hand drill. Prep your core sides as far as you want them. Use acetone to clean all epoxy squeeze out asap. Sanding g aluminum next to wood is messy.

1. Drill the core 1st. Use a nail or lunch to make a simple in order to prevent the drill bit from walking. Just use a square and eye ball the straightness. You likely know it will not be straight without a press.

2. Attach one side of the wood. Leave room (1/16") on your wood. If cut on the outside of a sharpie line...you'll be good. Mix the epoxy well & clamp firmly. Immediately wipe the wet epoxy very clean.

3. Drill through the predrilled core holes into the wooden scale. To avoid tearout secure the scale and core to another board.

4. Attach the 2nd scale.

5. Drill the other side in the same way. Be sure to clean the wet epoxy squeeze out .
6. I then epoxy pin and tap them into place. Be sure they fit before you mix the epoxy.

7. Use a dowel on curved parts & a ruler of flat parts...wrap in sand paper to round off the edges if you do not have a router. I have access to a router And I do not like them.

PS- It almost pains me to say this...but Hobby Lobby has the best prices on brass tubes and has a variety pack that includes 3/16" & 1/8".

On the T-88 marine quality epoxy. About $20 on Amazon for 2-8 oz bottles. Plenty for several slingshots.
 

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Grandpa Pete
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The best Epoxy I have found is the type used to glue the metal heads on golf clubs. I get it from a gold supply company. It is really tough. Imagine the beating it takes at the end of a golf club. I have also had good luck with J.B. Weld two part glues. I would suggest that you rough up the aluminum before you apply any epoxy. Ace Hardware sells brass rods that work well for pinning.

GP
Make that GOLF SUPPLY CO.
 

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I addition to what Makopat said, I think it is very possible to achieve decent pins without a drill press. Just use the Blue Tape trick!

I would do it in parts starting with the core. Once I have the holes through the core, I would put on some painters blue tape on the core and blue tape on the next scale to be attached. I will then put a few drops of superglue (CA glue) on the blue tape and stick the two parts together. Then I will just drill though using the core as the pilot hole guide for the next part. The parts can be split apart by prying and when you take the blue tape off, everything should be perfect and you'll have parts ready to prep for assembly. Repeat for other scales or additional laminates. I think it's important to "key" the parts for assembly by scratching up the surfaces to be glued but be careful not to scratch it to the edge or it will show on the finished item. Also take care not to tear-out on the other side but if you plan which side to drill you can put the tear-out side against the scale and hide any screw-ups.

I would use a slow dry two part epoxy to give yourself a longer window to work and clamp everything tight when assembling.
 

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Here is my epoxy mixing gear.

1. wax paper on the table. (q-tips, paper towels, wash clothe, and acetone on the side).
2. the epoxy.
3. the scrap cardboard
4. toothpicks for the holes and popsicle sticks for scales & pins.

Go to slow with the base it will be less viscous.

Put out a little at a time til and wait til it reaches the circle.

Same with the hardener.

Mix well. Apply a thin layer on the aluminum or pins.
 

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I have for some time made knife handles...Wood to aluminum is a bit trickier. I recommend T-88 slow cure epoxy. It can be found on Amazon and gives time to work & slow cure is stronger...which is necessary for aluminum (in my experience).

I also think you can use a hand drill. Prep your core sides as far as you want them. Use acetone to clean all epoxy squeeze out asap. Sanding g aluminum next to wood is messy.

1. Drill the core 1st. Use a nail or lunch to make a simple in order to prevent the drill bit from walking. Just use a square and eye ball the straightness. You likely know it will not be straight without a press.

2. Attach one side of the wood. Leave room (1/16") on your wood. If cut on the outside of a sharpie line...you'll be good. Mix the epoxy well & clamp firmly. Immediately wipe the wet epoxy very clean.

3. Drill through the predrilled core holes into the wooden scale. To avoid tearout secure the scale and core to another board.

4. Attach the 2nd scale.

5. Drill the other side in the same way. Be sure to clean the wet epoxy squeeze out .
6. I then epoxy pin and tap them into place. Be sure they fit before you mix the epoxy.

7. Use a dowel on curved parts & a ruler of flat parts...wrap in sand paper to round off the edges if you do not have a router. I have access to a router And I do not like them.

PS- It almost pains me to say this...but Hobby Lobby has the best prices on brass tubes and has a variety pack that includes 3/16" & 1/8".

On the T-88 marine quality epoxy. About $20 on Amazon for 2-8 oz bottles. Plenty for several slingshots.
Why the dis on Hobby Lobby?
 

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What Makopat said. This is how I (and do) would approach it.

You can also use bronze braising rods - they are 3.2mm so you'd need to get bits the same size. Also drill slowly through the aluminium.

Generally good advice here though by various members. Super Glue should work fine - though I'd be a little weary of it - epoxy is definitely the way to go.
 

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Premium Member
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I have for some time made knife handles...Wood to aluminum is a bit trickier. I recommend T-88 slow cure epoxy. It can be found on Amazon and gives time to work & slow cure is stronger...which is necessary for aluminum (in my experience).
I also think you can use a hand drill. Prep your core sides as far as you want them. Use acetone to clean all epoxy squeeze out asap. Sanding g aluminum next to wood is messy.
1. Drill the core 1st. Use a nail or lunch to make a simple in order to prevent the drill bit from walking. Just use a square and eye ball the straightness. You likely know it will not be straight without a press.
2. Attach one side of the wood. Leave room (1/16") on your wood. If cut on the outside of a sharpie line...you'll be good. Mix the epoxy well & clamp firmly. Immediately wipe the wet epoxy very clean.
3. Drill through the predrilled core holes into the wooden scale. To avoid tearout secure the scale and core to another board.
4. Attach the 2nd scale.
5. Drill the other side in the same way. Be sure to clean the wet epoxy squeeze out .
6. I then epoxy pin and tap them into place. Be sure they fit before you mix the epoxy.
7. Use a dowel on curved parts & a ruler of flat parts...wrap in sand paper to round off the edges if you do not have a router. I have access to a router And I do not like them.
PS- It almost pains me to say this...but Hobby Lobby has the best prices on brass tubes and has a variety pack that includes 3/16" & 1/8".
On the T-88 marine quality epoxy. About $20 on Amazon for 2-8 oz bottles. Plenty for several slingshots.
Why the dis on Hobby Lobby?
Just not a Hardware and it smells bad in my mind. And mark up is steep for so many inexpensive mass produced items.

More of a surprise than dis to find a quality item priced at a very reasonable price.
 

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What Makopat said. This is how I (and do) would approach it.

You can also use bronze braising rods - they are 3.2mm so you'd need to get bits the same size. Also drill slowly through the aluminium.

Generally good advice here though by various members. Super Glue should work fine - though I'd be a little weary of it - epoxy is definitely the way to go.
I know many fine makers that successfully use CA glue...but nan. you gotta be fast. And my pocket Carrie's usually end up at some point with a failed bond. Maybe it's my perspiration and heat that breaks the bond down...but I concur the trust is not there to the same degree.

But mostly the nexessary speed of the work.
 

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I,ve used CA glue alot... its got some awesome properties. However its fumes especially working with large areas can be a lot to deal with, and caustic. Also it loves penettrating fibres, so you could apply quite a good volume to have it dissapear into the subtrate especially on porous materials and it gets pretty darn hot when it does this. Some cases you almost need to do a layer to stabilise before joining the pieces. Then it also needs a near perfect bonding area. For me generally there are just so many ways it could go wrong. And its messy in an unpleasent instant way...

Also its not inherently strong, and is actually quite brittle.

I would definitely go epoxy where possible for this application.
 

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I like CA glue. But caustic is right. I wear a respirator. In my backpack and EDC bags I carry CA glue and cotton thread which because of the ease of absorption properties can be lashed and glued into a solid bit of MacGyver-ing.

A solid handle wrap in natural fiber and CA glue can be quite fetching and practical. If no epoxy or pins are available scales can be affixed in this manner.
 

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Missing Barns and Telling Yarns
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Excellent tips guys! Thanks for the feeback. I'll begin assembling my equipment and hopefully have something finished by the time Fall rolls around (funds and time being in short supply these days). I also saw the price of aluminum cores on Pocket Predators website, and it relieved my anxiety a little to see how cheap they were. So I'll jump in with the advice you've given and see what we get. Worst case scenario I'll have to buy another core and try again.
 

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SLING-N-SHOT
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Older post but question for the pins. Do you slide the rod through the core or do you use 2 pieces of pin, ex. One on each side?
I haven't done any laminated slings
....YET....but would think the pin would need to pass all the way through from one scale, through the core, and out the other scale, for structural strength

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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